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New Feature: This Week in Mobile Broadband

WASHINGTON, June 14, 2009 – Today, BroadbandCensus.com unveils a new feature, “This Week in Mobile Broadband,” written by Alex Tcherkassky, a Washington-based reporter for BroadbandCensus.com with a strong background in the wireless industry.

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By Alex Tcherkassky, Reporter, BroadbandCensus.com

Editor’s Note: Today, BroadbandCensus.com unveils a new feature, “This Week in Mobile Broadband,” written by Alex Tcherkassky, a Washington-based reporter for BroadbandCensus.com with a strong background in the wireless industry.

WASHINGTON, June 14, 2009 – Currently, all four carriers offer five Gigabytes (GB) of aircard-based broadband for $59.99 per month. Sprint, however, also has a plan that includes unlimited Wi-Max coverage (where available) for $79.99 per month. The commonality of price and bandwidth offerings provides little to no reason to change carriers to get mobile broadband, but makes it more appealing to simply add an aircard to your current account. Still, it’s surprising that neither T-Mobile nor Sprint have either lowered the price on their 5 GB plans or offered more or unlimited bandwidth at the $59.99 price point to try and take customers away from AT&T and Verizon Communications.

Monday June 8, 2009

Sprint announced a new mobile broadband plan for corporate-liable accounts. The plan provides 500 MB of access for $39.99 per month. This could be very appealing for companies with employees who have a wired connection in the office but need additional coverage for off-site work.

AT&T announced that the new iPhone 3GS would offer tethering at no additional charge. Until now, the only tethering option for the iPhone was via jailbreaking the device. Also, there will be no change to the thirty dollar price point of the iPhone data plan, making tethering the iPhone 3GS more appealing than tethering an AT&T BlackBerry, which would both be capped at 5 GB and cost $65 per month.

Wednesday June 10, 2009

Virgin Mobile USA announced a range of prepaid broadband options. Dubbed “Broadband2Go,” the service will go live in late June and will be accessed via the Ovation MC760 USB modem from Novatel. The MC760 will be available exclusively at Best Buy. The aircard also contains a Micro-SD card reader, turning the modem into a flash drive, similarly to the USB modem used with T-Mobile’s 3G aircard service. Most innovative about Virgin’s offering are the price plans: 30-day plans are set at $20, $40 and $60 dollars for 250 Megabytes (MB), 600 MB or one GB, respectively. The interesting price plan is the $10, ten day, 100 MB plan. The availability of such an ultra-low commitment plan could provide a low-risk option for people without broadband access who worry that the internet isn’t worth the forty or more dollars a month that traditional broadband access can cost. The added fact that it’s mobile may do even more to get these non-adopters online.

Friday June 12, 2009

America’s broadcasters have officially made the switch to digital. This means that the coveted 700 megahertz spectrum that was auctioned off last year can finally start being utilized for next generation mobile broadband. AT&T and Verizon, who won the lion’s share of the spectrum, can move forward with their fourth-generation (4G) networks. With the new spectrum available it will be exciting to see the slough of devices and services that come to market.

FCC

FCC’s Open Internet Workshop at MIT Brought Robust Exchange Among Academics

BOSTON, Mass., January 15, 2010 – Academics, economics, technology specialists, application creators, internet service operators and investors descended on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on Wednesday to discuss the possible effects of the proposed net neutrality rules on innovation, investment and internet users.

Sharon Gillette, chief of the Wireline Competition Bureau at the Federal Communications Commission and Paul de Sa, chief of the FCC’s Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis, moderated the late afternoon and evening workshop. This article summarizes the entire comments made at the substantive MIT workshop.

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By Alex Tcherkassky, Reporter, BroadbandCensus.com

Editor’s Note: Today, BroadbandCensus.com unveils a new feature, “This Week in Mobile Broadband,” written by Alex Tcherkassky, a Washington-based reporter for BroadbandCensus.com with a strong background in the wireless industry.

WASHINGTON, June 14, 2009 – Currently, all four carriers offer five Gigabytes (GB) of aircard-based broadband for $59.99 per month. Sprint, however, also has a plan that includes unlimited Wi-Max coverage (where available) for $79.99 per month. The commonality of price and bandwidth offerings provides little to no reason to change carriers to get mobile broadband, but makes it more appealing to simply add an aircard to your current account. Still, it’s surprising that neither T-Mobile nor Sprint have either lowered the price on their 5 GB plans or offered more or unlimited bandwidth at the $59.99 price point to try and take customers away from AT&T and Verizon Communications.

Monday June 8, 2009

Sprint announced a new mobile broadband plan for corporate-liable accounts. The plan provides 500 MB of access for $39.99 per month. This could be very appealing for companies with employees who have a wired connection in the office but need additional coverage for off-site work.

AT&T announced that the new iPhone 3GS would offer tethering at no additional charge. Until now, the only tethering option for the iPhone was via jailbreaking the device. Also, there will be no change to the thirty dollar price point of the iPhone data plan, making tethering the iPhone 3GS more appealing than tethering an AT&T BlackBerry, which would both be capped at 5 GB and cost $65 per month.

Wednesday June 10, 2009

Virgin Mobile USA announced a range of prepaid broadband options. Dubbed “Broadband2Go,” the service will go live in late June and will be accessed via the Ovation MC760 USB modem from Novatel. The MC760 will be available exclusively at Best Buy. The aircard also contains a Micro-SD card reader, turning the modem into a flash drive, similarly to the USB modem used with T-Mobile’s 3G aircard service. Most innovative about Virgin’s offering are the price plans: 30-day plans are set at $20, $40 and $60 dollars for 250 Megabytes (MB), 600 MB or one GB, respectively. The interesting price plan is the $10, ten day, 100 MB plan. The availability of such an ultra-low commitment plan could provide a low-risk option for people without broadband access who worry that the internet isn’t worth the forty or more dollars a month that traditional broadband access can cost. The added fact that it’s mobile may do even more to get these non-adopters online.

Friday June 12, 2009

America’s broadcasters have officially made the switch to digital. This means that the coveted 700 megahertz spectrum that was auctioned off last year can finally start being utilized for next generation mobile broadband. AT&T and Verizon, who won the lion’s share of the spectrum, can move forward with their fourth-generation (4G) networks. With the new spectrum available it will be exciting to see the slough of devices and services that come to market.

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Broadband's Impact

Broadband People: Winter Casey Joins Google’s Washington Office

WASHINGTON, January 8, 2010 – After nearly a decade as a journalist in Washington, Winter Casey has accepted a position at Google where she will be doing strategic policy work. Casey, a self-described nerd, is looking forward to working for Google at the intersection of technology, policy and business issues.

Broadband Breakfast Staff

Published

on

By Alex Tcherkassky, Reporter, BroadbandCensus.com

Editor’s Note: Today, BroadbandCensus.com unveils a new feature, “This Week in Mobile Broadband,” written by Alex Tcherkassky, a Washington-based reporter for BroadbandCensus.com with a strong background in the wireless industry.

WASHINGTON, June 14, 2009 – Currently, all four carriers offer five Gigabytes (GB) of aircard-based broadband for $59.99 per month. Sprint, however, also has a plan that includes unlimited Wi-Max coverage (where available) for $79.99 per month. The commonality of price and bandwidth offerings provides little to no reason to change carriers to get mobile broadband, but makes it more appealing to simply add an aircard to your current account. Still, it’s surprising that neither T-Mobile nor Sprint have either lowered the price on their 5 GB plans or offered more or unlimited bandwidth at the $59.99 price point to try and take customers away from AT&T and Verizon Communications.

Monday June 8, 2009

Sprint announced a new mobile broadband plan for corporate-liable accounts. The plan provides 500 MB of access for $39.99 per month. This could be very appealing for companies with employees who have a wired connection in the office but need additional coverage for off-site work.

AT&T announced that the new iPhone 3GS would offer tethering at no additional charge. Until now, the only tethering option for the iPhone was via jailbreaking the device. Also, there will be no change to the thirty dollar price point of the iPhone data plan, making tethering the iPhone 3GS more appealing than tethering an AT&T BlackBerry, which would both be capped at 5 GB and cost $65 per month.

Wednesday June 10, 2009

Virgin Mobile USA announced a range of prepaid broadband options. Dubbed “Broadband2Go,” the service will go live in late June and will be accessed via the Ovation MC760 USB modem from Novatel. The MC760 will be available exclusively at Best Buy. The aircard also contains a Micro-SD card reader, turning the modem into a flash drive, similarly to the USB modem used with T-Mobile’s 3G aircard service. Most innovative about Virgin’s offering are the price plans: 30-day plans are set at $20, $40 and $60 dollars for 250 Megabytes (MB), 600 MB or one GB, respectively. The interesting price plan is the $10, ten day, 100 MB plan. The availability of such an ultra-low commitment plan could provide a low-risk option for people without broadband access who worry that the internet isn’t worth the forty or more dollars a month that traditional broadband access can cost. The added fact that it’s mobile may do even more to get these non-adopters online.

Friday June 12, 2009

America’s broadcasters have officially made the switch to digital. This means that the coveted 700 megahertz spectrum that was auctioned off last year can finally start being utilized for next generation mobile broadband. AT&T and Verizon, who won the lion’s share of the spectrum, can move forward with their fourth-generation (4G) networks. With the new spectrum available it will be exciting to see the slough of devices and services that come to market.

Continue Reading

Broadband's Impact

Broadband People Column: FCC’s Clyburn, Baker Get New Assignments

WASHINGTON, December 18, 2009 – The Federal Communications Commission has appointed Commissioners Mignon Clyburn and Meredith Attwell Baker to serve on the federal-state boards for universal service and jurisdictional separations. Clyburn will serve as federal chair of both panels. FCC Commissioner Michael Copps will continue to serve on both boards.

The Federal-State Joint Board on Universal Service was established by the Telecommunications Act of 1996 to implement universal service provisions and to make recommendations on universal service matters. The Federal-State Joint Board on Jurisdictional Separations advises the FCC on the apportionment of regulated costs between interstate and intrastate jurisdictions.

Avatar

Published

on

By Alex Tcherkassky, Reporter, BroadbandCensus.com

Editor’s Note: Today, BroadbandCensus.com unveils a new feature, “This Week in Mobile Broadband,” written by Alex Tcherkassky, a Washington-based reporter for BroadbandCensus.com with a strong background in the wireless industry.

WASHINGTON, June 14, 2009 – Currently, all four carriers offer five Gigabytes (GB) of aircard-based broadband for $59.99 per month. Sprint, however, also has a plan that includes unlimited Wi-Max coverage (where available) for $79.99 per month. The commonality of price and bandwidth offerings provides little to no reason to change carriers to get mobile broadband, but makes it more appealing to simply add an aircard to your current account. Still, it’s surprising that neither T-Mobile nor Sprint have either lowered the price on their 5 GB plans or offered more or unlimited bandwidth at the $59.99 price point to try and take customers away from AT&T and Verizon Communications.

Monday June 8, 2009

Sprint announced a new mobile broadband plan for corporate-liable accounts. The plan provides 500 MB of access for $39.99 per month. This could be very appealing for companies with employees who have a wired connection in the office but need additional coverage for off-site work.

AT&T announced that the new iPhone 3GS would offer tethering at no additional charge. Until now, the only tethering option for the iPhone was via jailbreaking the device. Also, there will be no change to the thirty dollar price point of the iPhone data plan, making tethering the iPhone 3GS more appealing than tethering an AT&T BlackBerry, which would both be capped at 5 GB and cost $65 per month.

Wednesday June 10, 2009

Virgin Mobile USA announced a range of prepaid broadband options. Dubbed “Broadband2Go,” the service will go live in late June and will be accessed via the Ovation MC760 USB modem from Novatel. The MC760 will be available exclusively at Best Buy. The aircard also contains a Micro-SD card reader, turning the modem into a flash drive, similarly to the USB modem used with T-Mobile’s 3G aircard service. Most innovative about Virgin’s offering are the price plans: 30-day plans are set at $20, $40 and $60 dollars for 250 Megabytes (MB), 600 MB or one GB, respectively. The interesting price plan is the $10, ten day, 100 MB plan. The availability of such an ultra-low commitment plan could provide a low-risk option for people without broadband access who worry that the internet isn’t worth the forty or more dollars a month that traditional broadband access can cost. The added fact that it’s mobile may do even more to get these non-adopters online.

Friday June 12, 2009

America’s broadcasters have officially made the switch to digital. This means that the coveted 700 megahertz spectrum that was auctioned off last year can finally start being utilized for next generation mobile broadband. AT&T and Verizon, who won the lion’s share of the spectrum, can move forward with their fourth-generation (4G) networks. With the new spectrum available it will be exciting to see the slough of devices and services that come to market.

Continue Reading

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