Connect with us

Broadband Updates

Ronald Coase's 'The Federal Communications Commission', 50 Years On

Half a century ago, economist Ronald Coase criticized the political allocation of radio frequencies by the federal government in a seminal article, entitled “The Federal Communications Commission,” in the Journal of Law and Economics. He argued that the government could achieve efficient allocation by allowing property rights in the electromagnetic spectrum. He later won the Nobel Prize in Economics for the ideas first articulated in that paper.

Broadband Breakfast Staff

Published

on

Half a century ago, economist Ronald Coase criticized the political allocation of radio frequencies by the federal government in a seminal article, entitled “The Federal Communications Commission,” in the Journal of Law and Economics. He argued that the government could achieve efficient allocation by allowing property rights in the electromagnetic spectrum. He later won the Nobel Prize in Economics for the ideas first articulated in that paper.

While Coase’s ideas have been vindicated, and a market in radio property has developed, what impact has it had on the FCC? What is Coase’s legacy, and how salient are his ideas for the future of spectrum allocation?

His ideas will be put to the test again this month in an event on October 29 co-hosted by the Progress & Freedom Foundation and the Mercatus Center in an event at the George Mason University School of Law.

Broadband Data

U.S. Broadband Deployment and Speeds are Beating Europe’s, Says Scholar Touting ‘Facilities-based Competition’

Avatar

Published

on

Half a century ago, economist Ronald Coase criticized the political allocation of radio frequencies by the federal government in a seminal article, entitled “The Federal Communications Commission,” in the Journal of Law and Economics. He argued that the government could achieve efficient allocation by allowing property rights in the electromagnetic spectrum. He later won the Nobel Prize in Economics for the ideas first articulated in that paper.

While Coase’s ideas have been vindicated, and a market in radio property has developed, what impact has it had on the FCC? What is Coase’s legacy, and how salient are his ideas for the future of spectrum allocation?

His ideas will be put to the test again this month in an event on October 29 co-hosted by the Progress & Freedom Foundation and the Mercatus Center in an event at the George Mason University School of Law.

Continue Reading

Broadband Updates

Discussion of Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event on High-Capacity Applications and Gigabit Connectivity

WASHINGTON, September 24, 2013 – The Broadband Breakfast Club released the first video of its Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event, on “How High-Capacity Applications Are Driving Gigabit Connectivity.”

The dialogue featured Dr. Glenn Ricart, Chief Technology Officer, US IGNITESheldon Grizzle of GigTank in Chattanooga, Tennessee; Todd MarriottExecutive Director of UTOPIA, the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency, and Drew ClarkChairman and Publisher, BroadbandBreakfast.com.

Drew Clark

Published

on

Half a century ago, economist Ronald Coase criticized the political allocation of radio frequencies by the federal government in a seminal article, entitled “The Federal Communications Commission,” in the Journal of Law and Economics. He argued that the government could achieve efficient allocation by allowing property rights in the electromagnetic spectrum. He later won the Nobel Prize in Economics for the ideas first articulated in that paper.

While Coase’s ideas have been vindicated, and a market in radio property has developed, what impact has it had on the FCC? What is Coase’s legacy, and how salient are his ideas for the future of spectrum allocation?

His ideas will be put to the test again this month in an event on October 29 co-hosted by the Progress & Freedom Foundation and the Mercatus Center in an event at the George Mason University School of Law.

Continue Reading

#broadbandlive

Breakfast Club Video: ‘Gigabit and Ultra-High-Speed Networks: Where They Stand Now and How They Are Building the Future’

Avatar

Published

on

Half a century ago, economist Ronald Coase criticized the political allocation of radio frequencies by the federal government in a seminal article, entitled “The Federal Communications Commission,” in the Journal of Law and Economics. He argued that the government could achieve efficient allocation by allowing property rights in the electromagnetic spectrum. He later won the Nobel Prize in Economics for the ideas first articulated in that paper.

While Coase’s ideas have been vindicated, and a market in radio property has developed, what impact has it had on the FCC? What is Coase’s legacy, and how salient are his ideas for the future of spectrum allocation?

His ideas will be put to the test again this month in an event on October 29 co-hosted by the Progress & Freedom Foundation and the Mercatus Center in an event at the George Mason University School of Law.

Continue Reading

Recent

Signup for Broadband Breakfast

Get twice-weekly Breakfast Media news alerts.
* = required field

Trending