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United Kingdom Defines Carbon Neutrality for the First Time

WASHINGTON, November 15, 2009 – The government of the United Kingdom defined the term “carbon neutral” this month after holding a public consultation on the subject.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change, which was established in 2008, said that “carbon neutral means that – through a transparent process of calculating emissions, reducing those emissions and offsetting residual emissions – net carbon emissions equal zero.”

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WASHINGTON, November 15, 2009 – The government of the United Kingdom defined the term “carbon neutral” this month after holding a public consultation on the subject.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change, which was established in 2008, said that “carbon neutral means that – through a transparent process of calculating emissions, reducing those emissions and offsetting residual emissions – net carbon emissions equal zero.”

The term “carbon neutral” has been used by a number of prominent UnitedStates companies – including tech firms such as Yahoo, Google, and Dell — but what exactly the phrase means has not been clear.

The David Suzuki Foundation, for example, holds that “Going carbon neutral is an easy way to take responsibility for the greenhouse gas emissions we create every time we drive our cars, take a plane, or turn on our computers. It’s based on the principle that, since climate change is a global problem, an emission reduction made elsewhere has the same positive effect as one made locally. Here’s how it works: if you add polluting emissions to the atmosphere, you can effectively subtract them by purchasing ‘carbon offsets’.”

Yahoo has defined its goal of going carbon neutral as not wanting “our energy use to add greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. So we’re measuring our impacts, reducing within Yahoo! where we can, and, for what remains, investing in projects elsewhere that reduce greenhouse gases in amounts equal to what we are emitting. For every ton of greenhouse gas emissions that we can’t avoid putting into the atmosphere, we’ll take out the same amount somewhere else.”

However, Yahoo originally proposed doing this partially through carbon offset credits, which the company announced this year that it would stop doing.

A representative from Hewlett-Packard said last month that the use of carbon offsets in order to claim carbon neutrality has been put into question by a number of studies.

Advanced Energy

White House Launches ‘Smart City’ Initiative That Links Broadband Connectivity to Urban Solutions

WASHINGTON, September 16, 2015 – A movement to make cities “smart” by using the power of broadband and information technology processing power is reaching critical mass, with the White House on Monday announcing a comprehensive initiative to support municipal efforts.

Coinciding with the Smart Cities Week conference here this week, the White House released a 4,000-word summary of more than $160 million in federal research investments, leveraging more than 25 technology collaborations with local communities.

The goal of these efforts? Tackling such key challenges, in the words of the White House, as “reducing traffic congestion, fighting crime, fostering economic growth, managing the effects of a changing climate, and improving the delivery of city services.”

“Advances in science and technology have the potential to accelerate these efforts,” read the White House statement. “An emerging community of civic leaders, data scientists, technologists, and companies are joining forces to build ‘Smart Cities’ – communities that are building an infrastructure to continuously improve the collection, aggregation, and use of data to improve the life of their residents – by harnessing the growing data revolution, low-cost sensors, and research collaborations, and doing so securely to protect safety and privacy.”

The launch of White House Smart Cities Initiative

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Drew Clark

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WASHINGTON, November 15, 2009 – The government of the United Kingdom defined the term “carbon neutral” this month after holding a public consultation on the subject.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change, which was established in 2008, said that “carbon neutral means that – through a transparent process of calculating emissions, reducing those emissions and offsetting residual emissions – net carbon emissions equal zero.”

The term “carbon neutral” has been used by a number of prominent UnitedStates companies – including tech firms such as Yahoo, Google, and Dell — but what exactly the phrase means has not been clear.

The David Suzuki Foundation, for example, holds that “Going carbon neutral is an easy way to take responsibility for the greenhouse gas emissions we create every time we drive our cars, take a plane, or turn on our computers. It’s based on the principle that, since climate change is a global problem, an emission reduction made elsewhere has the same positive effect as one made locally. Here’s how it works: if you add polluting emissions to the atmosphere, you can effectively subtract them by purchasing ‘carbon offsets’.”

Yahoo has defined its goal of going carbon neutral as not wanting “our energy use to add greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. So we’re measuring our impacts, reducing within Yahoo! where we can, and, for what remains, investing in projects elsewhere that reduce greenhouse gases in amounts equal to what we are emitting. For every ton of greenhouse gas emissions that we can’t avoid putting into the atmosphere, we’ll take out the same amount somewhere else.”

However, Yahoo originally proposed doing this partially through carbon offset credits, which the company announced this year that it would stop doing.

A representative from Hewlett-Packard said last month that the use of carbon offsets in order to claim carbon neutrality has been put into question by a number of studies.

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Broadband's Impact

Global Cities Teams Challenges Next Round: Nov. 12-13, 2015

Editor’s Note: We’ve received this note from the Global Cities Teams Challenges of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and US Ignite. Read more about the these important challenges.

Save the Date – An Important Event Related to the Next Round of the Global Cities Teams Challenge: November 12-13, 2015

Municipal leaders and innovators will gather at the NIST Campus in Gaithersburg, Maryland on November 12-13 for an important event related to the next round of Global City Team Challenge (GCTC). An agenda for the November event and a summary of exciting changes that NIST and US Ignite have planned for the next round of the GCTC will be circulated soon.

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Broadband Breakfast Staff

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WASHINGTON, November 15, 2009 – The government of the United Kingdom defined the term “carbon neutral” this month after holding a public consultation on the subject.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change, which was established in 2008, said that “carbon neutral means that – through a transparent process of calculating emissions, reducing those emissions and offsetting residual emissions – net carbon emissions equal zero.”

The term “carbon neutral” has been used by a number of prominent UnitedStates companies – including tech firms such as Yahoo, Google, and Dell — but what exactly the phrase means has not been clear.

The David Suzuki Foundation, for example, holds that “Going carbon neutral is an easy way to take responsibility for the greenhouse gas emissions we create every time we drive our cars, take a plane, or turn on our computers. It’s based on the principle that, since climate change is a global problem, an emission reduction made elsewhere has the same positive effect as one made locally. Here’s how it works: if you add polluting emissions to the atmosphere, you can effectively subtract them by purchasing ‘carbon offsets’.”

Yahoo has defined its goal of going carbon neutral as not wanting “our energy use to add greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. So we’re measuring our impacts, reducing within Yahoo! where we can, and, for what remains, investing in projects elsewhere that reduce greenhouse gases in amounts equal to what we are emitting. For every ton of greenhouse gas emissions that we can’t avoid putting into the atmosphere, we’ll take out the same amount somewhere else.”

However, Yahoo originally proposed doing this partially through carbon offset credits, which the company announced this year that it would stop doing.

A representative from Hewlett-Packard said last month that the use of carbon offsets in order to claim carbon neutrality has been put into question by a number of studies.

Continue Reading

Infrastructure

Update on the Global City Teams Challenge and Recently Announced NSF Funding Opportunities

Broadband Breakfast Staff

Published

on

WASHINGTON, November 15, 2009 – The government of the United Kingdom defined the term “carbon neutral” this month after holding a public consultation on the subject.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change, which was established in 2008, said that “carbon neutral means that – through a transparent process of calculating emissions, reducing those emissions and offsetting residual emissions – net carbon emissions equal zero.”

The term “carbon neutral” has been used by a number of prominent UnitedStates companies – including tech firms such as Yahoo, Google, and Dell — but what exactly the phrase means has not been clear.

The David Suzuki Foundation, for example, holds that “Going carbon neutral is an easy way to take responsibility for the greenhouse gas emissions we create every time we drive our cars, take a plane, or turn on our computers. It’s based on the principle that, since climate change is a global problem, an emission reduction made elsewhere has the same positive effect as one made locally. Here’s how it works: if you add polluting emissions to the atmosphere, you can effectively subtract them by purchasing ‘carbon offsets’.”

Yahoo has defined its goal of going carbon neutral as not wanting “our energy use to add greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. So we’re measuring our impacts, reducing within Yahoo! where we can, and, for what remains, investing in projects elsewhere that reduce greenhouse gases in amounts equal to what we are emitting. For every ton of greenhouse gas emissions that we can’t avoid putting into the atmosphere, we’ll take out the same amount somewhere else.”

However, Yahoo originally proposed doing this partially through carbon offset credits, which the company announced this year that it would stop doing.

A representative from Hewlett-Packard said last month that the use of carbon offsets in order to claim carbon neutrality has been put into question by a number of studies.

Continue Reading

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