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Adults with Chronic Disease Less Likely to Have Internet Access

WASHINGTON, March 25, 2010 – Adults living with chronic disease are significantly less likely than healthy adults to have access to the internet, according to a new report.

Broadband Breakfast Staff

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WASHINGTON, March 25, 2010 – Adults living with chronic disease are significantly less likely than healthy adults to have access to the internet, according to a new report.

Data from the Pew Internet Project and the California HealthCare Foundation found that 81 percent of adults reporting no chronic disease go online and 62 percent of adults living with one or more chronic diseases go online.

Additionally, people managing multiple diseases are less likely to have internet access. Statistically speaking, according to the report, chronic disease is associated with being older, African American, less educated and living in a lower-income household.

Fifty-one percent of American adults living with chronic disease have looked online for health information, such as information about a specific disease, drugs or a medical procedure.
By comparison, 66 percent of adults who report no chronic conditions use the internet to gather health information.

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U.S. Broadband Deployment and Speeds are Beating Europe’s, Says Scholar Touting ‘Facilities-based Competition’

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WASHINGTON, March 25, 2010 – Adults living with chronic disease are significantly less likely than healthy adults to have access to the internet, according to a new report.

Data from the Pew Internet Project and the California HealthCare Foundation found that 81 percent of adults reporting no chronic disease go online and 62 percent of adults living with one or more chronic diseases go online.

Additionally, people managing multiple diseases are less likely to have internet access. Statistically speaking, according to the report, chronic disease is associated with being older, African American, less educated and living in a lower-income household.

Fifty-one percent of American adults living with chronic disease have looked online for health information, such as information about a specific disease, drugs or a medical procedure.
By comparison, 66 percent of adults who report no chronic conditions use the internet to gather health information.

Continue Reading

Broadband Updates

Discussion of Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event on High-Capacity Applications and Gigabit Connectivity

WASHINGTON, September 24, 2013 – The Broadband Breakfast Club released the first video of its Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event, on “How High-Capacity Applications Are Driving Gigabit Connectivity.”

The dialogue featured Dr. Glenn Ricart, Chief Technology Officer, US IGNITESheldon Grizzle of GigTank in Chattanooga, Tennessee; Todd MarriottExecutive Director of UTOPIA, the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency, and Drew ClarkChairman and Publisher, BroadbandBreakfast.com.

Drew Clark

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WASHINGTON, March 25, 2010 – Adults living with chronic disease are significantly less likely than healthy adults to have access to the internet, according to a new report.

Data from the Pew Internet Project and the California HealthCare Foundation found that 81 percent of adults reporting no chronic disease go online and 62 percent of adults living with one or more chronic diseases go online.

Additionally, people managing multiple diseases are less likely to have internet access. Statistically speaking, according to the report, chronic disease is associated with being older, African American, less educated and living in a lower-income household.

Fifty-one percent of American adults living with chronic disease have looked online for health information, such as information about a specific disease, drugs or a medical procedure.
By comparison, 66 percent of adults who report no chronic conditions use the internet to gather health information.

Continue Reading

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Breakfast Club Video: ‘Gigabit and Ultra-High-Speed Networks: Where They Stand Now and How They Are Building the Future’

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Published

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WASHINGTON, March 25, 2010 – Adults living with chronic disease are significantly less likely than healthy adults to have access to the internet, according to a new report.

Data from the Pew Internet Project and the California HealthCare Foundation found that 81 percent of adults reporting no chronic disease go online and 62 percent of adults living with one or more chronic diseases go online.

Additionally, people managing multiple diseases are less likely to have internet access. Statistically speaking, according to the report, chronic disease is associated with being older, African American, less educated and living in a lower-income household.

Fifty-one percent of American adults living with chronic disease have looked online for health information, such as information about a specific disease, drugs or a medical procedure.
By comparison, 66 percent of adults who report no chronic conditions use the internet to gather health information.

Continue Reading

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