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More Than 600 Groups Responded to Google’s Broadband Stimulus

WASHINGTON, March 26, 2010 – On Friday, Google announced the latest responses to their request for information on town seeking ultra high speed broadband connectivity to. A number of small towns assembled projects, and otherwise sought to publicize their efforts to become among the few selected Google sites. More than 600 community groups have responded, and with more than 190,000 responses from specific individuals.

Broadband Breakfast Staff

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WASHINGTON, March 26, 2010 – On Friday, Google announced the latest responses to their request for information on town seeking ultra high speed broadband connectivity to. A number of small towns assembled projects, and otherwise sought to publicize their efforts to become among the few selected Google sites. More than 600 community groups have responded, and with more than 190,000 responses from specific individuals.

The goal of the Google project, says the company, is to bring high-speed connectivity to between 100,000 and 500,000 people. In a blog post, Google also highlighted some of the stunts in an effort to attract Google’s attention: jumping into a frozen lake, renaming a town, and a number of rallies that have been held.

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U.S. Broadband Deployment and Speeds are Beating Europe’s, Says Scholar Touting ‘Facilities-based Competition’

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WASHINGTON, March 26, 2010 – On Friday, Google announced the latest responses to their request for information on town seeking ultra high speed broadband connectivity to. A number of small towns assembled projects, and otherwise sought to publicize their efforts to become among the few selected Google sites. More than 600 community groups have responded, and with more than 190,000 responses from specific individuals.

The goal of the Google project, says the company, is to bring high-speed connectivity to between 100,000 and 500,000 people. In a blog post, Google also highlighted some of the stunts in an effort to attract Google’s attention: jumping into a frozen lake, renaming a town, and a number of rallies that have been held.

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Broadband Updates

Discussion of Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event on High-Capacity Applications and Gigabit Connectivity

WASHINGTON, September 24, 2013 – The Broadband Breakfast Club released the first video of its Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event, on “How High-Capacity Applications Are Driving Gigabit Connectivity.”

The dialogue featured Dr. Glenn Ricart, Chief Technology Officer, US IGNITESheldon Grizzle of GigTank in Chattanooga, Tennessee; Todd MarriottExecutive Director of UTOPIA, the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency, and Drew ClarkChairman and Publisher, BroadbandBreakfast.com.

Drew Clark

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WASHINGTON, March 26, 2010 – On Friday, Google announced the latest responses to their request for information on town seeking ultra high speed broadband connectivity to. A number of small towns assembled projects, and otherwise sought to publicize their efforts to become among the few selected Google sites. More than 600 community groups have responded, and with more than 190,000 responses from specific individuals.

The goal of the Google project, says the company, is to bring high-speed connectivity to between 100,000 and 500,000 people. In a blog post, Google also highlighted some of the stunts in an effort to attract Google’s attention: jumping into a frozen lake, renaming a town, and a number of rallies that have been held.

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Breakfast Club Video: ‘Gigabit and Ultra-High-Speed Networks: Where They Stand Now and How They Are Building the Future’

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WASHINGTON, March 26, 2010 – On Friday, Google announced the latest responses to their request for information on town seeking ultra high speed broadband connectivity to. A number of small towns assembled projects, and otherwise sought to publicize their efforts to become among the few selected Google sites. More than 600 community groups have responded, and with more than 190,000 responses from specific individuals.

The goal of the Google project, says the company, is to bring high-speed connectivity to between 100,000 and 500,000 people. In a blog post, Google also highlighted some of the stunts in an effort to attract Google’s attention: jumping into a frozen lake, renaming a town, and a number of rallies that have been held.

Continue Reading

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