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Top This, Topeka: All First-Born Children to Be Named ‘Google’

When the city of Duluth, Minnesota, did not receive funding from their broadband stimulus application to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s Broadband Technologies Opportunity Program application, they turned to Google.

A few weeks ago, Google announced their own efforts to expand broadband through a trial of high-speed fiber-optic network which would deliver speeds of one Gigabit per second (1Gbps). As part of their application, the city has even created an amusing Youtube video, saying that all first-born children will be named Google.

Broadband Breakfast Staff

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When the city of Duluth, Minnesota, did not receive funding from their broadband stimulus application to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s Broadband Technologies Opportunity Program application, they turned to Google.

A few weeks ago, Google announced their own efforts to expand broadband through a trial of high-speed fiber-optic network which would deliver speeds of one Gigabit per second (1Gbps). As part of their application, the city has even created an amusing Youtube video, saying that all first-born children will be named Google.

YouTube clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03pCyixPuws

The video was in response to the town of Topeka, Kansas, which renamed itself Google – but just for the for the month of March – in order to receive favorable treatment in their bid.

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U.S. Broadband Deployment and Speeds are Beating Europe’s, Says Scholar Touting ‘Facilities-based Competition’

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When the city of Duluth, Minnesota, did not receive funding from their broadband stimulus application to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s Broadband Technologies Opportunity Program application, they turned to Google.

A few weeks ago, Google announced their own efforts to expand broadband through a trial of high-speed fiber-optic network which would deliver speeds of one Gigabit per second (1Gbps). As part of their application, the city has even created an amusing Youtube video, saying that all first-born children will be named Google.

YouTube clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03pCyixPuws

The video was in response to the town of Topeka, Kansas, which renamed itself Google – but just for the for the month of March – in order to receive favorable treatment in their bid.

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Broadband Updates

Discussion of Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event on High-Capacity Applications and Gigabit Connectivity

WASHINGTON, September 24, 2013 – The Broadband Breakfast Club released the first video of its Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event, on “How High-Capacity Applications Are Driving Gigabit Connectivity.”

The dialogue featured Dr. Glenn Ricart, Chief Technology Officer, US IGNITESheldon Grizzle of GigTank in Chattanooga, Tennessee; Todd MarriottExecutive Director of UTOPIA, the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency, and Drew ClarkChairman and Publisher, BroadbandBreakfast.com.

Drew Clark

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When the city of Duluth, Minnesota, did not receive funding from their broadband stimulus application to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s Broadband Technologies Opportunity Program application, they turned to Google.

A few weeks ago, Google announced their own efforts to expand broadband through a trial of high-speed fiber-optic network which would deliver speeds of one Gigabit per second (1Gbps). As part of their application, the city has even created an amusing Youtube video, saying that all first-born children will be named Google.

YouTube clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03pCyixPuws

The video was in response to the town of Topeka, Kansas, which renamed itself Google – but just for the for the month of March – in order to receive favorable treatment in their bid.

Continue Reading

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Breakfast Club Video: ‘Gigabit and Ultra-High-Speed Networks: Where They Stand Now and How They Are Building the Future’

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When the city of Duluth, Minnesota, did not receive funding from their broadband stimulus application to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s Broadband Technologies Opportunity Program application, they turned to Google.

A few weeks ago, Google announced their own efforts to expand broadband through a trial of high-speed fiber-optic network which would deliver speeds of one Gigabit per second (1Gbps). As part of their application, the city has even created an amusing Youtube video, saying that all first-born children will be named Google.

YouTube clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03pCyixPuws

The video was in response to the town of Topeka, Kansas, which renamed itself Google – but just for the for the month of March – in order to receive favorable treatment in their bid.

Continue Reading

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