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Economists Say Network Neutrality Regulation Would Harm Consumers

WASHINGTON, April 12, 2010 – A group of well-known economists has determined that the Federal Communications Commission’s proposed network neutrality regulations would harm consumer welfare.

Broadband Breakfast Staff

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WASHINGTON, April 12, 2010 – A group of well-known economists has determined that the Federal Communications Commission’s proposed network neutrality regulations would harm consumer welfare.

The group of 21 economists includes Jerry Brito of George Mason University’s Mercatus Center, Robert Crandall of the Brookings Institution, David Farber with Carnegie Mellon University, and Jeffrey Eisenach and Hal Singer of Navigant Economics.

They say the government should not attempt to regulate the networks of high-speed Internet service providers to ensure that those companies give all consumers equal service.

“The economic evidence provides no support for the existence of market failure sufficient to warrant” the type of regulation proposed by the FCC, according to a statement from the group promoting the report “Network Neutrality: The Economic Evidence.”

The economists believe that “to the extent the types of conduct addressed in the [notice of proposed rulemaking] may, in isolated circumstances, have the potential to harm competition or consumers, the commission has and other regulatory bodies have the ability to deter or prohibit such conduct on a case-by-case basis, through the application of existing doctrines and procedures.”

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U.S. Broadband Deployment and Speeds are Beating Europe’s, Says Scholar Touting ‘Facilities-based Competition’

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WASHINGTON, April 12, 2010 – A group of well-known economists has determined that the Federal Communications Commission’s proposed network neutrality regulations would harm consumer welfare.

The group of 21 economists includes Jerry Brito of George Mason University’s Mercatus Center, Robert Crandall of the Brookings Institution, David Farber with Carnegie Mellon University, and Jeffrey Eisenach and Hal Singer of Navigant Economics.

They say the government should not attempt to regulate the networks of high-speed Internet service providers to ensure that those companies give all consumers equal service.

“The economic evidence provides no support for the existence of market failure sufficient to warrant” the type of regulation proposed by the FCC, according to a statement from the group promoting the report “Network Neutrality: The Economic Evidence.”

The economists believe that “to the extent the types of conduct addressed in the [notice of proposed rulemaking] may, in isolated circumstances, have the potential to harm competition or consumers, the commission has and other regulatory bodies have the ability to deter or prohibit such conduct on a case-by-case basis, through the application of existing doctrines and procedures.”

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Broadband Updates

Discussion of Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event on High-Capacity Applications and Gigabit Connectivity

WASHINGTON, September 24, 2013 – The Broadband Breakfast Club released the first video of its Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event, on “How High-Capacity Applications Are Driving Gigabit Connectivity.”

The dialogue featured Dr. Glenn Ricart, Chief Technology Officer, US IGNITESheldon Grizzle of GigTank in Chattanooga, Tennessee; Todd MarriottExecutive Director of UTOPIA, the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency, and Drew ClarkChairman and Publisher, BroadbandBreakfast.com.

Drew Clark

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WASHINGTON, April 12, 2010 – A group of well-known economists has determined that the Federal Communications Commission’s proposed network neutrality regulations would harm consumer welfare.

The group of 21 economists includes Jerry Brito of George Mason University’s Mercatus Center, Robert Crandall of the Brookings Institution, David Farber with Carnegie Mellon University, and Jeffrey Eisenach and Hal Singer of Navigant Economics.

They say the government should not attempt to regulate the networks of high-speed Internet service providers to ensure that those companies give all consumers equal service.

“The economic evidence provides no support for the existence of market failure sufficient to warrant” the type of regulation proposed by the FCC, according to a statement from the group promoting the report “Network Neutrality: The Economic Evidence.”

The economists believe that “to the extent the types of conduct addressed in the [notice of proposed rulemaking] may, in isolated circumstances, have the potential to harm competition or consumers, the commission has and other regulatory bodies have the ability to deter or prohibit such conduct on a case-by-case basis, through the application of existing doctrines and procedures.”

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Breakfast Club Video: ‘Gigabit and Ultra-High-Speed Networks: Where They Stand Now and How They Are Building the Future’

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WASHINGTON, April 12, 2010 – A group of well-known economists has determined that the Federal Communications Commission’s proposed network neutrality regulations would harm consumer welfare.

The group of 21 economists includes Jerry Brito of George Mason University’s Mercatus Center, Robert Crandall of the Brookings Institution, David Farber with Carnegie Mellon University, and Jeffrey Eisenach and Hal Singer of Navigant Economics.

They say the government should not attempt to regulate the networks of high-speed Internet service providers to ensure that those companies give all consumers equal service.

“The economic evidence provides no support for the existence of market failure sufficient to warrant” the type of regulation proposed by the FCC, according to a statement from the group promoting the report “Network Neutrality: The Economic Evidence.”

The economists believe that “to the extent the types of conduct addressed in the [notice of proposed rulemaking] may, in isolated circumstances, have the potential to harm competition or consumers, the commission has and other regulatory bodies have the ability to deter or prohibit such conduct on a case-by-case basis, through the application of existing doctrines and procedures.”

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