Connect with us

Broadband's Impact

Court Orders Google to Turn Over Wireless Data in Portland Case

WASHINGTON, May 31, 2010 – A U.S. District Court in Portland, Ore., has ordered Google to turn over wireless data from its Street View cars which was taken while photographing neighborhoods.

Broadband Breakfast Staff

Published

on

WASHINGTON, May 31, 2010 – A U.S. District Court in Portland, Ore., has ordered Google to turn over wireless data from its Street View cars which was taken while photographing neighborhoods.

Google revealed that its Street View cars were collecting wireless data in April to enhance location-based services for  smartphones, but claimed that no personal information was being taken from the Wi-Fi networks.  Several lawsuits have been filed against Google, including the one in Portland, alleging that Google was collecting private information such as e-mails and video belonging to the owners of home Wi-Fi networks.

Last week Google chose to retain the data, and it is declining to comment on the lawsuits. Three federal lawmakers have requested that Google explain what its intentions were in regards to the information, and the Federal Trade Commission currently has an informal probe underway to investigate the allegations.

Health

Digital Health Companies Adapted With Agility to Meet Outstanding Demands During the Pandemic

Derek Shumway

Published

on

Screenshot of Kinsa CEO Inder Singh

WASHINGTON, May 31, 2010 – A U.S. District Court in Portland, Ore., has ordered Google to turn over wireless data from its Street View cars which was taken while photographing neighborhoods.

Google revealed that its Street View cars were collecting wireless data in April to enhance location-based services for  smartphones, but claimed that no personal information was being taken from the Wi-Fi networks.  Several lawsuits have been filed against Google, including the one in Portland, alleging that Google was collecting private information such as e-mails and video belonging to the owners of home Wi-Fi networks.

Last week Google chose to retain the data, and it is declining to comment on the lawsuits. Three federal lawmakers have requested that Google explain what its intentions were in regards to the information, and the Federal Trade Commission currently has an informal probe underway to investigate the allegations.

Continue Reading

Education

How Virtual Learning Is Being Reinvigorated Through Tech, From CES 2021

Samuel Triginelli

Published

on

WASHINGTON, May 31, 2010 – A U.S. District Court in Portland, Ore., has ordered Google to turn over wireless data from its Street View cars which was taken while photographing neighborhoods.

Google revealed that its Street View cars were collecting wireless data in April to enhance location-based services for  smartphones, but claimed that no personal information was being taken from the Wi-Fi networks.  Several lawsuits have been filed against Google, including the one in Portland, alleging that Google was collecting private information such as e-mails and video belonging to the owners of home Wi-Fi networks.

Last week Google chose to retain the data, and it is declining to comment on the lawsuits. Three federal lawmakers have requested that Google explain what its intentions were in regards to the information, and the Federal Trade Commission currently has an informal probe underway to investigate the allegations.

Continue Reading

Broadband's Impact

AMD Keynote at CES 2021 Touts Computing Power’s Role in Connectivity During Pandemic

Derek Shumway

Published

on

Photo of AMD's Lisa Su during CES 2021 keynote speech from Tech Power Up

WASHINGTON, May 31, 2010 – A U.S. District Court in Portland, Ore., has ordered Google to turn over wireless data from its Street View cars which was taken while photographing neighborhoods.

Google revealed that its Street View cars were collecting wireless data in April to enhance location-based services for  smartphones, but claimed that no personal information was being taken from the Wi-Fi networks.  Several lawsuits have been filed against Google, including the one in Portland, alleging that Google was collecting private information such as e-mails and video belonging to the owners of home Wi-Fi networks.

Last week Google chose to retain the data, and it is declining to comment on the lawsuits. Three federal lawmakers have requested that Google explain what its intentions were in regards to the information, and the Federal Trade Commission currently has an informal probe underway to investigate the allegations.

Continue Reading

Recent

Signup for Broadband Breakfast

Get twice-weekly Breakfast Media news alerts.
* = required field

Trending