US Falls Behind According to Akamai State of the Internet Report

Broadband Data July 27th, 2010

, Deputy Editor, BroadbandBreakfast.com

WASHINGTON July 27, 2010 – Akamai has just released data from its annual State of the Internet Report and the US is falling behind. South Korea has the fastest average maximum speed of 33Mbps, followed by Japan with 26Mbps, Romania with 25Mbos, the US ranks 8th with a speed of 16mbps.

Only 25% of the US has access to a connection above 5Mbps.

The fastest city in the world is Masan, South Korea which has an average Maximum Connection speed of 40.56Mbps; the first showing of the United States is at number 57 with Monterey Park, CA with a speed of 25.2Mbps.

When looking at the average connection speeds the United States again lags behind the rest of the world. Monterey Park, CA having the fastest connection again possesses the fastest average connection of just 7Mbps.

Within the United States, Delaware boasts the fastest average measured connection speed of 7.6Mbps, with the District of Columbia being the next fastest with a speed of 5.9Mbps. The slowest states in the nation are Alaska and New Jersey.

Globally Mayotte, a small island nation of the coast of Africa has the slowest connection with 99% of the connection below 256kbps.


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2 Responses to “US Falls Behind According to Akamai State of the Internet Report”

  1. Tweets that mention BroadbandBreakfast.com: US Falls Behind According to Akamai State of the Internet Report -- Topsy.com Says:

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  2. Brett Glass Says:

    Akamai can’t tell that. Remember, Akamai provides such things as downloads of software updates, which go on in the background on machinesthat do other things. Those downloads are (and should be) deprioritized and use less bandwidth because they share the user’s connection with foreground tasks.

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