Connect with us

Broadband Updates

FCC Lays Out Plans to Overhaul Universal Service Fund

WASHINGTON, September 7, 2010 – The Federal Communications Commission late last week laid out part of its plan to reform the universal service fund, including pushing Sprint and Nextel to live up to their commitments to surrender their high-cost universal support over five years.

Broadband Breakfast Staff

Published

on

WASHINGTON, September 7, 2010 – The Federal Communications Commission late last week laid out part of its plan to reform the universal service fund, including pushing Sprint and Nextel to live up to their commitments to surrender their high-cost universal support over five years.

In the order issued Sept. 3, the agency says that the surrendered support shouldn’t have to be redistributed to other telecommunications carriers.

It also directs that the surrendered support be reserved for a potential down payment on broadband USF reforms as it laid out in the National Broadband Plan. The reforms recommended that the e-rate fund be indexed to inflation, support should be given to the mobility fund to provide wireless broadband services in areas that lack coverage and to improve use of the rural health care program offering advanced telemedicine to rural areas and tribal lands.

In its notice of proposed rulemaking accompanying the order, the FCC is seeking comments on its recommendations to best use reclaimed excess high-cost support.

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said that the agency’s decision “ensures that USF support for mobile voice that Verizon Wireless and Sprint had previously agreed to relinquish will be used as a down payment on broadband universal service reform.”

He added that USF transformation won’t be easy, “but it’s underway.”

Broadband Data

U.S. Broadband Deployment and Speeds are Beating Europe’s, Says Scholar Touting ‘Facilities-based Competition’

Avatar

Published

on

WASHINGTON, September 7, 2010 – The Federal Communications Commission late last week laid out part of its plan to reform the universal service fund, including pushing Sprint and Nextel to live up to their commitments to surrender their high-cost universal support over five years.

In the order issued Sept. 3, the agency says that the surrendered support shouldn’t have to be redistributed to other telecommunications carriers.

It also directs that the surrendered support be reserved for a potential down payment on broadband USF reforms as it laid out in the National Broadband Plan. The reforms recommended that the e-rate fund be indexed to inflation, support should be given to the mobility fund to provide wireless broadband services in areas that lack coverage and to improve use of the rural health care program offering advanced telemedicine to rural areas and tribal lands.

In its notice of proposed rulemaking accompanying the order, the FCC is seeking comments on its recommendations to best use reclaimed excess high-cost support.

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said that the agency’s decision “ensures that USF support for mobile voice that Verizon Wireless and Sprint had previously agreed to relinquish will be used as a down payment on broadband universal service reform.”

He added that USF transformation won’t be easy, “but it’s underway.”

Continue Reading

Broadband Updates

Discussion of Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event on High-Capacity Applications and Gigabit Connectivity

WASHINGTON, September 24, 2013 – The Broadband Breakfast Club released the first video of its Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event, on “How High-Capacity Applications Are Driving Gigabit Connectivity.”

The dialogue featured Dr. Glenn Ricart, Chief Technology Officer, US IGNITESheldon Grizzle of GigTank in Chattanooga, Tennessee; Todd MarriottExecutive Director of UTOPIA, the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency, and Drew ClarkChairman and Publisher, BroadbandBreakfast.com.

Drew Clark

Published

on

WASHINGTON, September 7, 2010 – The Federal Communications Commission late last week laid out part of its plan to reform the universal service fund, including pushing Sprint and Nextel to live up to their commitments to surrender their high-cost universal support over five years.

In the order issued Sept. 3, the agency says that the surrendered support shouldn’t have to be redistributed to other telecommunications carriers.

It also directs that the surrendered support be reserved for a potential down payment on broadband USF reforms as it laid out in the National Broadband Plan. The reforms recommended that the e-rate fund be indexed to inflation, support should be given to the mobility fund to provide wireless broadband services in areas that lack coverage and to improve use of the rural health care program offering advanced telemedicine to rural areas and tribal lands.

In its notice of proposed rulemaking accompanying the order, the FCC is seeking comments on its recommendations to best use reclaimed excess high-cost support.

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said that the agency’s decision “ensures that USF support for mobile voice that Verizon Wireless and Sprint had previously agreed to relinquish will be used as a down payment on broadband universal service reform.”

He added that USF transformation won’t be easy, “but it’s underway.”

Continue Reading

#broadbandlive

Breakfast Club Video: ‘Gigabit and Ultra-High-Speed Networks: Where They Stand Now and How They Are Building the Future’

Avatar

Published

on

WASHINGTON, September 7, 2010 – The Federal Communications Commission late last week laid out part of its plan to reform the universal service fund, including pushing Sprint and Nextel to live up to their commitments to surrender their high-cost universal support over five years.

In the order issued Sept. 3, the agency says that the surrendered support shouldn’t have to be redistributed to other telecommunications carriers.

It also directs that the surrendered support be reserved for a potential down payment on broadband USF reforms as it laid out in the National Broadband Plan. The reforms recommended that the e-rate fund be indexed to inflation, support should be given to the mobility fund to provide wireless broadband services in areas that lack coverage and to improve use of the rural health care program offering advanced telemedicine to rural areas and tribal lands.

In its notice of proposed rulemaking accompanying the order, the FCC is seeking comments on its recommendations to best use reclaimed excess high-cost support.

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said that the agency’s decision “ensures that USF support for mobile voice that Verizon Wireless and Sprint had previously agreed to relinquish will be used as a down payment on broadband universal service reform.”

He added that USF transformation won’t be easy, “but it’s underway.”

Continue Reading

Recent

Signup for Broadband Breakfast

Get twice-weekly Breakfast Media news alerts.
* = required field

Trending