Connect with us

Broadband Updates

FCC Seeks Input on How to Treat Specialized Services, Mobile Broadband

WASHINGTON, September 1, 2010 – Sometimes, no matter what you do, things are complicated and you can’t please every one all the time. Welcome to the world of Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski who said Wednesday that his agency is seeking more public input on issues related to specialized services and mobile broadband. While he didn’t specifically refer to the recent controversial policy pact made by Google and Verizon regarding managed services and wireless issues, he was presumably reacting to it.

Avatar

Published

on

WASHINGTON, September 1, 2010 – Sometimes, no matter what you do, things are complicated and you can’t please every one all the time. Welcome to the world of Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski who said Wednesday that his agency is seeking more public input on issues related to specialized services and mobile broadband.

He issued a statement Wednesday defending his agency’s diligent efforts to “preserve the freedom and openness of the internet” in the face of a longstanding and acrimonious debate on how to do just that.

Genachowski expressed concern over recent events highlighting questions on how open internet rules should apply to specialized services and mobile broadband. While he didn’t specifically refer to the recent controversial policy pact made by Google and Verizon regarding managed services and wireless issues, he was presumably reacting to it.

“We have moved from a world of four disputed and unenforceable open Internet principles — about blocking by broadband providers of lawful online content, applications, and services — toward the acceptance of six enforceable rules: the original four principles plus the concepts of nondiscrimination and transparency,” he said, adding that “these would prevent broadband providers from wrongly playing favorites with lawful Internet speech or businesses, and would empower consumers and entrepreneurs with information about broadband choices and networks.”

He said the issues are complex and the “details matter. Even a proposal that accepts enforceable rules can be flawed in its specifics and risk undermining the fundamental goal of preserving the open Internet.”

He announced that the FCC’s Wireline and Wireless bureaus are seeking further public comment on issues related to specialized services and mobile broadband. Genachowski said the information gleaned from this latest inquiry will “help complete our efforts to construct an enforceable framework to preserve Internet freedom and openness.”

Broadband Data

U.S. Broadband Deployment and Speeds are Beating Europe’s, Says Scholar Touting ‘Facilities-based Competition’

Avatar

Published

on

WASHINGTON, September 1, 2010 – Sometimes, no matter what you do, things are complicated and you can’t please every one all the time. Welcome to the world of Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski who said Wednesday that his agency is seeking more public input on issues related to specialized services and mobile broadband.

He issued a statement Wednesday defending his agency’s diligent efforts to “preserve the freedom and openness of the internet” in the face of a longstanding and acrimonious debate on how to do just that.

Genachowski expressed concern over recent events highlighting questions on how open internet rules should apply to specialized services and mobile broadband. While he didn’t specifically refer to the recent controversial policy pact made by Google and Verizon regarding managed services and wireless issues, he was presumably reacting to it.

“We have moved from a world of four disputed and unenforceable open Internet principles — about blocking by broadband providers of lawful online content, applications, and services — toward the acceptance of six enforceable rules: the original four principles plus the concepts of nondiscrimination and transparency,” he said, adding that “these would prevent broadband providers from wrongly playing favorites with lawful Internet speech or businesses, and would empower consumers and entrepreneurs with information about broadband choices and networks.”

He said the issues are complex and the “details matter. Even a proposal that accepts enforceable rules can be flawed in its specifics and risk undermining the fundamental goal of preserving the open Internet.”

He announced that the FCC’s Wireline and Wireless bureaus are seeking further public comment on issues related to specialized services and mobile broadband. Genachowski said the information gleaned from this latest inquiry will “help complete our efforts to construct an enforceable framework to preserve Internet freedom and openness.”

Continue Reading

Broadband Updates

Discussion of Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event on High-Capacity Applications and Gigabit Connectivity

WASHINGTON, September 24, 2013 – The Broadband Breakfast Club released the first video of its Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event, on “How High-Capacity Applications Are Driving Gigabit Connectivity.”

The dialogue featured Dr. Glenn Ricart, Chief Technology Officer, US IGNITESheldon Grizzle of GigTank in Chattanooga, Tennessee; Todd MarriottExecutive Director of UTOPIA, the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency, and Drew ClarkChairman and Publisher, BroadbandBreakfast.com.

Drew Clark

Published

on

WASHINGTON, September 1, 2010 – Sometimes, no matter what you do, things are complicated and you can’t please every one all the time. Welcome to the world of Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski who said Wednesday that his agency is seeking more public input on issues related to specialized services and mobile broadband.

He issued a statement Wednesday defending his agency’s diligent efforts to “preserve the freedom and openness of the internet” in the face of a longstanding and acrimonious debate on how to do just that.

Genachowski expressed concern over recent events highlighting questions on how open internet rules should apply to specialized services and mobile broadband. While he didn’t specifically refer to the recent controversial policy pact made by Google and Verizon regarding managed services and wireless issues, he was presumably reacting to it.

“We have moved from a world of four disputed and unenforceable open Internet principles — about blocking by broadband providers of lawful online content, applications, and services — toward the acceptance of six enforceable rules: the original four principles plus the concepts of nondiscrimination and transparency,” he said, adding that “these would prevent broadband providers from wrongly playing favorites with lawful Internet speech or businesses, and would empower consumers and entrepreneurs with information about broadband choices and networks.”

He said the issues are complex and the “details matter. Even a proposal that accepts enforceable rules can be flawed in its specifics and risk undermining the fundamental goal of preserving the open Internet.”

He announced that the FCC’s Wireline and Wireless bureaus are seeking further public comment on issues related to specialized services and mobile broadband. Genachowski said the information gleaned from this latest inquiry will “help complete our efforts to construct an enforceable framework to preserve Internet freedom and openness.”

Continue Reading

#broadbandlive

Breakfast Club Video: ‘Gigabit and Ultra-High-Speed Networks: Where They Stand Now and How They Are Building the Future’

Avatar

Published

on

WASHINGTON, September 1, 2010 – Sometimes, no matter what you do, things are complicated and you can’t please every one all the time. Welcome to the world of Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski who said Wednesday that his agency is seeking more public input on issues related to specialized services and mobile broadband.

He issued a statement Wednesday defending his agency’s diligent efforts to “preserve the freedom and openness of the internet” in the face of a longstanding and acrimonious debate on how to do just that.

Genachowski expressed concern over recent events highlighting questions on how open internet rules should apply to specialized services and mobile broadband. While he didn’t specifically refer to the recent controversial policy pact made by Google and Verizon regarding managed services and wireless issues, he was presumably reacting to it.

“We have moved from a world of four disputed and unenforceable open Internet principles — about blocking by broadband providers of lawful online content, applications, and services — toward the acceptance of six enforceable rules: the original four principles plus the concepts of nondiscrimination and transparency,” he said, adding that “these would prevent broadband providers from wrongly playing favorites with lawful Internet speech or businesses, and would empower consumers and entrepreneurs with information about broadband choices and networks.”

He said the issues are complex and the “details matter. Even a proposal that accepts enforceable rules can be flawed in its specifics and risk undermining the fundamental goal of preserving the open Internet.”

He announced that the FCC’s Wireline and Wireless bureaus are seeking further public comment on issues related to specialized services and mobile broadband. Genachowski said the information gleaned from this latest inquiry will “help complete our efforts to construct an enforceable framework to preserve Internet freedom and openness.”

Continue Reading

Recent

Signup for Broadband Breakfast

Get twice-weekly Breakfast Media news alerts.
* = required field

Trending