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Senate Moves to Final Vote on Patent Reform

WASHINGTON, March 8, 2011 – The Senate voted Monday to end debate and may move to a final vote as early as Tuesday on a bill that would overhaul the nation’s patent system for the first time in nearly 60 years.

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WASHINGTON, March 8, 2011 – The Senate voted Monday to end debate and may move to a final vote as early as Tuesday on a bill that would overhaul the nation’s patent system for the first time in nearly 60 years.

The Senate voted Monday by an 87-3 margin to approve an invocation of cloture, bringing debate to a close on the America Invents Act – formerly the Patent Reform Act of 2011.  The Senate is scheduled to consider the bill Tuesday afternoon, but has not yet locked in a time for a final vote.

One of the largest changes the bill would institute if it becomes law is switching the U.S. from a First-to-Invent system to a First-to-File system.  In the former, only the original inventor of a device or process may rightfully file for patent protection.  The First-to-File system, however, grants protection to the first inventor that brings a prosecutable claim to the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).  The change would bring the U.S. into harmony with the great majority of global patent systems, which rely on First-to-File.

“Now is the time to act.  Now is the time to vote,” said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee and the bill’s original sponsor, during his statement before the cloture vote Monday.  “Now is the time to move forward with this job-creating bill that will help boost our economy and restore America’s competitive edge in the global marketplace.”

Congress

With Mike Pence Presiding, Joint Session of Congress Confirms Electoral Votes for President-elect Joe Biden

Jericho Casper

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Photo of Vice President Mike Pence presiding over the joint session of Congress from WHYY

WASHINGTON, March 8, 2011 – The Senate voted Monday to end debate and may move to a final vote as early as Tuesday on a bill that would overhaul the nation’s patent system for the first time in nearly 60 years.

The Senate voted Monday by an 87-3 margin to approve an invocation of cloture, bringing debate to a close on the America Invents Act – formerly the Patent Reform Act of 2011.  The Senate is scheduled to consider the bill Tuesday afternoon, but has not yet locked in a time for a final vote.

One of the largest changes the bill would institute if it becomes law is switching the U.S. from a First-to-Invent system to a First-to-File system.  In the former, only the original inventor of a device or process may rightfully file for patent protection.  The First-to-File system, however, grants protection to the first inventor that brings a prosecutable claim to the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).  The change would bring the U.S. into harmony with the great majority of global patent systems, which rely on First-to-File.

“Now is the time to act.  Now is the time to vote,” said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee and the bill’s original sponsor, during his statement before the cloture vote Monday.  “Now is the time to move forward with this job-creating bill that will help boost our economy and restore America’s competitive edge in the global marketplace.”

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Congress

Trump Pushes for Section 230 Revisions, While House Overrides Veto of Defense Bill, Sending It to GOP-led Senate

Jericho Casper

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Photo of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi from February 2018 by Gage Skidmore used with permission

WASHINGTON, March 8, 2011 – The Senate voted Monday to end debate and may move to a final vote as early as Tuesday on a bill that would overhaul the nation’s patent system for the first time in nearly 60 years.

The Senate voted Monday by an 87-3 margin to approve an invocation of cloture, bringing debate to a close on the America Invents Act – formerly the Patent Reform Act of 2011.  The Senate is scheduled to consider the bill Tuesday afternoon, but has not yet locked in a time for a final vote.

One of the largest changes the bill would institute if it becomes law is switching the U.S. from a First-to-Invent system to a First-to-File system.  In the former, only the original inventor of a device or process may rightfully file for patent protection.  The First-to-File system, however, grants protection to the first inventor that brings a prosecutable claim to the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).  The change would bring the U.S. into harmony with the great majority of global patent systems, which rely on First-to-File.

“Now is the time to act.  Now is the time to vote,” said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee and the bill’s original sponsor, during his statement before the cloture vote Monday.  “Now is the time to move forward with this job-creating bill that will help boost our economy and restore America’s competitive edge in the global marketplace.”

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Section 230

President Trump’s FCC Nominee Grilled on Section 230 During Senate Confirmation Hearing

Jericho Casper

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Photo of Nathan Simington during his Senate confirmation hearing

WASHINGTON, March 8, 2011 – The Senate voted Monday to end debate and may move to a final vote as early as Tuesday on a bill that would overhaul the nation’s patent system for the first time in nearly 60 years.

The Senate voted Monday by an 87-3 margin to approve an invocation of cloture, bringing debate to a close on the America Invents Act – formerly the Patent Reform Act of 2011.  The Senate is scheduled to consider the bill Tuesday afternoon, but has not yet locked in a time for a final vote.

One of the largest changes the bill would institute if it becomes law is switching the U.S. from a First-to-Invent system to a First-to-File system.  In the former, only the original inventor of a device or process may rightfully file for patent protection.  The First-to-File system, however, grants protection to the first inventor that brings a prosecutable claim to the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).  The change would bring the U.S. into harmony with the great majority of global patent systems, which rely on First-to-File.

“Now is the time to act.  Now is the time to vote,” said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee and the bill’s original sponsor, during his statement before the cloture vote Monday.  “Now is the time to move forward with this job-creating bill that will help boost our economy and restore America’s competitive edge in the global marketplace.”

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