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International

Sen. John Kerry Issues Statement on International Telecommunications Union Negotiations

Broadband Breakfast Staff

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WASHINGTON, December 14, 2012 – Senator John Kerry, D-Mass., today issued the following statement on the outcome of negotiations that took place during the recent meeting of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

“The result of this week’s ITU negotiations sends the wrong message about government’s role in Internet governance. Rather than a discussion of government controls, we should be finding ways to expand access to this powerful and democratic tool.  A more active government role in international Internet governance would be a mistake, as the delegations of many governments—led by the United States—made clear.

“The Internet is an open and inclusive network by design, and should remain an endless resource of information and free expression. To suggest altering the current stakeholder-led, voluntary structure risks opening the door to restrictions that could limit the freedom of expression and change the underlying principles that have given us the Internet as we know it. The discussion this week should have focused on proven strategies to expand access to communications and free expression across the globe – not on a centralized power grab of this international network of networks. The United States Congress has been clear on this issue: keep the government out of the global management of the Internet and preserve the successful multi-stakeholder model.”

China

President-Elect Joe Biden Needs to Reassure Global Allies That ‘America First’ Policy is Over

Liana Sowa

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Photo of Former CIA Director John Brennan from February 2019 by Gage Skidmore used with permission

WASHINGTON, December 14, 2012 – Senator John Kerry, D-Mass., today issued the following statement on the outcome of negotiations that took place during the recent meeting of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

“The result of this week’s ITU negotiations sends the wrong message about government’s role in Internet governance. Rather than a discussion of government controls, we should be finding ways to expand access to this powerful and democratic tool.  A more active government role in international Internet governance would be a mistake, as the delegations of many governments—led by the United States—made clear.

“The Internet is an open and inclusive network by design, and should remain an endless resource of information and free expression. To suggest altering the current stakeholder-led, voluntary structure risks opening the door to restrictions that could limit the freedom of expression and change the underlying principles that have given us the Internet as we know it. The discussion this week should have focused on proven strategies to expand access to communications and free expression across the globe – not on a centralized power grab of this international network of networks. The United States Congress has been clear on this issue: keep the government out of the global management of the Internet and preserve the successful multi-stakeholder model.”

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China

America Thought Economic Liberalization Would Mean Political Liberalization, But Not China

Liana Sowa

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on

Screenshot from the Hudson Institute event

WASHINGTON, December 14, 2012 – Senator John Kerry, D-Mass., today issued the following statement on the outcome of negotiations that took place during the recent meeting of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

“The result of this week’s ITU negotiations sends the wrong message about government’s role in Internet governance. Rather than a discussion of government controls, we should be finding ways to expand access to this powerful and democratic tool.  A more active government role in international Internet governance would be a mistake, as the delegations of many governments—led by the United States—made clear.

“The Internet is an open and inclusive network by design, and should remain an endless resource of information and free expression. To suggest altering the current stakeholder-led, voluntary structure risks opening the door to restrictions that could limit the freedom of expression and change the underlying principles that have given us the Internet as we know it. The discussion this week should have focused on proven strategies to expand access to communications and free expression across the globe – not on a centralized power grab of this international network of networks. The United States Congress has been clear on this issue: keep the government out of the global management of the Internet and preserve the successful multi-stakeholder model.”

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Africa

Lorraine Kipling: Broadband Affordability Around the World Reflects a Global Digital Divide

Broadband Breakfast Staff

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The author of this Expert Opinion is Lorraine Kipling

WASHINGTON, December 14, 2012 – Senator John Kerry, D-Mass., today issued the following statement on the outcome of negotiations that took place during the recent meeting of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

“The result of this week’s ITU negotiations sends the wrong message about government’s role in Internet governance. Rather than a discussion of government controls, we should be finding ways to expand access to this powerful and democratic tool.  A more active government role in international Internet governance would be a mistake, as the delegations of many governments—led by the United States—made clear.

“The Internet is an open and inclusive network by design, and should remain an endless resource of information and free expression. To suggest altering the current stakeholder-led, voluntary structure risks opening the door to restrictions that could limit the freedom of expression and change the underlying principles that have given us the Internet as we know it. The discussion this week should have focused on proven strategies to expand access to communications and free expression across the globe – not on a centralized power grab of this international network of networks. The United States Congress has been clear on this issue: keep the government out of the global management of the Internet and preserve the successful multi-stakeholder model.”

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