Broadband Roundup: A Spectrum Efficiency Challenge, Comcast Comments, Verizon Vexes Industry

FCC, Fiber, Mobile Broadband, Net Neutrality, Wireless October 7th, 2014

, Reporter, Broadband Breakfast

WASHINGTON, October 7, 2014 – Federal Communications Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel and wireless industry pioneer Marty Cooper took to the opinion page of the San Jose Mercury News to offer their thoughts on the future of wireless spectrum.

As they emphasized the importance and centrality of mobile devices and Internet access, the two highlighted the limited amount of spectrum for wireless broadband. The answer to this problem: a federal challenge to find ways to use the finite amount of spectrum 50 to 100 times more efficiently, which they dubbed “Race to the Top, Spectrum Edition.” The potential prize of this challenge: 10 Megahertz, suitable for mobile broadband.

The duo acknowledged the fact that the reward may seem small. However, if the minimum efficiency benchmark is reached, “10 megahertz of spectrum could do the work of 500 megahertz using today’s technology.” Furthermore, the winner could sell or lease the spectrum prize.

The FCC Commissioner and Cooper, regarded as the “father of the cellphone,” both see the challenge as a much-needed catalyst to further wireless innovation. “We could take what we learn from it to help develop new measures of spectrum efficiency…. Revolutionary opportunities lie ahead — if we find new ways to seize them.”

Comments for Comcast Merger Extended

The Federal Communications Commission has extended the comment period for the Comcast-Time Warner Cable merger to allow opponents more time to respond, National Journal reported. The Commission approved Dish Network’s request to extend the deadline until Oct. 29 in light of Comcast and Time Warner Cable’s 850-page defense of their deal, which, as the FCC pointed out in its extension, was both late and “incomplete or…otherwise nonresponsive.”

The FCC has “paused” the 180-day timeline it set for itself to issue a decision on the merger. While Comcast had opposed the extension, its spokeswoman said that the extension is routine for major transactions like its prior Comcast-NBCUniversal deal, which was ultimately approved.

Fiber Providers Add Video as Cable Companies Nix TV

As more small cable companies move to offering internet-only access, Little Rock-based Windstream announced its move in the opposite direction: a fiber-carried TV option called Kinetic, for 50,000 homes in the Lincoln, Nebraska area starting in the first half of 2015.

Kinetic calls itself, “a total entertainment option that leverages the company’s existing 100 percent fiber-backed network to provide customers with a wide array of features that will enable the highest quality video entertainment,” reported.

Windstream will offer Kinetic with its high-speed internet and phone service. Where the company cannot deploy this IP-TV product, it will partner with satellite providers for their triple-play offerings, CEO Jeff Gardner said at the Comptel PLUS Convention.

Broadband Industry Mutters Under Its Breath At Verizon

The government’s net neutrality rules were thrown out when Verizon Communications won its case against the Federal Communications Commission, and the broadband industry is not pleased, the National Journal reported.

Not only could the current outcome of the net neutrality debate lead to tighter regulation of wired broadband under Title II, but it could also lead to net neutrality rules being applied to wireless broadband, which was left largely untouched in the 2010 Open Internet Order. While Verizon’s broadband peers won’t publicly chastise the telecom giant, broadband-industry officials have spoke of the extensive frustration for Verizon’s strategic error. Some had urged Verizon to drop its lawsuit.  

“They were like a dog chasing a bus,” one broadband source said. “What are you going to do when you catch the bus?”


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