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Half of Offline Americans Live in Rural | Daily Yonder | Keep It Rural

Broadband Breakfast Staff

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Americans who don’t use the Internet have more than just their lack of digital communication in common. They are also more likely to be rural, elderly and poor.

About 48% of the 50 million Americans who haven’t gone online in the last year live in nonmetro areas, according to a new report from McKinsey & Company, a management consulting firm. In contrast, only about 15% of the overall U.S. population lives in nonmetro areas.

That means the average rural resident is three times more likely to be offline than the average urban resident.

Eighty percent of people who don’t use the Internet are lower income, and more than half of the offline population is aged 55 and up.

The figures are based on a variety of federal data sources, as analyzed by McKinsey in the report “Offline and Falling Behind: Barriers to Internet Adoption.”

Opinions vary about just how much of a world leader the United States is in online use. A Pew Research Internet Project survey from September 2013 shows about 70% of Americans aged 18 and older had broadband at home, up from 66% the year before.

Source: www.dailyyonder.com

An important article from the Daily Yonder diagnoses the key problems keeping rural areas from getting or taking broadband services.

See on Scoop.itBroadbandPolicy

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Public Safety

FCC’s Jessica Rosenworcel Tells Public Safety She Wants to Halt the T-Band Auction and Fund 911 Upgrades

Liana Sowa

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Photo of FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel

Americans who don’t use the Internet have more than just their lack of digital communication in common. They are also more likely to be rural, elderly and poor.

About 48% of the 50 million Americans who haven’t gone online in the last year live in nonmetro areas, according to a new report from McKinsey & Company, a management consulting firm. In contrast, only about 15% of the overall U.S. population lives in nonmetro areas.

That means the average rural resident is three times more likely to be offline than the average urban resident.

Eighty percent of people who don’t use the Internet are lower income, and more than half of the offline population is aged 55 and up.

The figures are based on a variety of federal data sources, as analyzed by McKinsey in the report “Offline and Falling Behind: Barriers to Internet Adoption.”

Opinions vary about just how much of a world leader the United States is in online use. A Pew Research Internet Project survey from September 2013 shows about 70% of Americans aged 18 and older had broadband at home, up from 66% the year before.

Source: www.dailyyonder.com

An important article from the Daily Yonder diagnoses the key problems keeping rural areas from getting or taking broadband services.

See on Scoop.itBroadbandPolicy

Continue Reading

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Pre-Pandemic Survey of Internet Use by Commerce Department’s NTIA Finds Almost All College Students Online

Liana Sowa

Published

on

Photo of Rafi Goldberg from Serve Public

Americans who don’t use the Internet have more than just their lack of digital communication in common. They are also more likely to be rural, elderly and poor.

About 48% of the 50 million Americans who haven’t gone online in the last year live in nonmetro areas, according to a new report from McKinsey & Company, a management consulting firm. In contrast, only about 15% of the overall U.S. population lives in nonmetro areas.

That means the average rural resident is three times more likely to be offline than the average urban resident.

Eighty percent of people who don’t use the Internet are lower income, and more than half of the offline population is aged 55 and up.

The figures are based on a variety of federal data sources, as analyzed by McKinsey in the report “Offline and Falling Behind: Barriers to Internet Adoption.”

Opinions vary about just how much of a world leader the United States is in online use. A Pew Research Internet Project survey from September 2013 shows about 70% of Americans aged 18 and older had broadband at home, up from 66% the year before.

Source: www.dailyyonder.com

An important article from the Daily Yonder diagnoses the key problems keeping rural areas from getting or taking broadband services.

See on Scoop.itBroadbandPolicy

Continue Reading

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Looming Income Inequality Demands a National Broadband Plan for the Next Decade, Says Benton Expert

Jericho Casper

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on

Photo of Sunne Wright McPeak from the webinar

Americans who don’t use the Internet have more than just their lack of digital communication in common. They are also more likely to be rural, elderly and poor.

About 48% of the 50 million Americans who haven’t gone online in the last year live in nonmetro areas, according to a new report from McKinsey & Company, a management consulting firm. In contrast, only about 15% of the overall U.S. population lives in nonmetro areas.

That means the average rural resident is three times more likely to be offline than the average urban resident.

Eighty percent of people who don’t use the Internet are lower income, and more than half of the offline population is aged 55 and up.

The figures are based on a variety of federal data sources, as analyzed by McKinsey in the report “Offline and Falling Behind: Barriers to Internet Adoption.”

Opinions vary about just how much of a world leader the United States is in online use. A Pew Research Internet Project survey from September 2013 shows about 70% of Americans aged 18 and older had broadband at home, up from 66% the year before.

Source: www.dailyyonder.com

An important article from the Daily Yonder diagnoses the key problems keeping rural areas from getting or taking broadband services.

See on Scoop.itBroadbandPolicy

Continue Reading

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