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New Anti-Robocall Tools, House Passes 3 Tech Bills, Senate Commerce Clears Others, Is Open RAN Facilitating Protectionism?

Liana Sowa

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Photo of Bronwyn Howell courtesy Victorian University of Wellington

New Secure Telephone Identity Governance Authority Policies mitigate robocalls, Pallone and Doyle praise the passage of bills that will strengthen the communications network, O-RAN facilitating protectionism in the name of competition, Senate corrects MCAST system

The Secure Telephone Identity Governance Authority announced new policies to advance the STIR/SHAKEN protocol in the fight against illegal robocalls.

Through STIR/SHAKEN cryptographic system, service providers can mark calls with digital certificates and verify the accuracy of caller ID. The STI-GA gives service providers a way to collaborate as they ensure that only approved service providers are enrolled in the SHAKEN ecosystem.

The STI-GA recently updated their service provider code token access policy so that all service providers are required to certify with the Federal Communications Commission that they have either implemented STIR/SHAKEN or have a robocall mitigation program certification on file with the FCC.

This also includes an Operating Company Number and the FCC’s 499A report, the form used by the FCC and its Universal Service Administrative Company to track revenues of telecommunications service providers.

Until the FCC makes the portal available for service providers to file certifications, this new policy will not go into effect. The portal is projected to be open around March 31, 2021, and until then the current SPC token access policy will remain.

Pallone and Doyle praise the passage of bills that will strengthen the communications network

Energy and Commerce Chairman Frank Pallone, Jr., D-N.J., and Communications Subcommittee Chairman Mike Doyle, D-Penn., issued the following statement yesterday about three bills passed in the House of Representatives: “From keeping Americans better informed during emergencies to promoting 5G coordination, competitiveness and security, these three bills will create a better, safer communications network for us all. ”

The first bill, H.R. 6096, the “Reliable Emergency Alert Distribution Improvement (READI) Act of 2020,” amends the Warning, Alert, and Response Network Act, classifying emergency alerts from the Federal Emergency Management Agency as a type of alert that commercial mobile service providers cannot allow subscribers to block from their devices. The bill has several requirements for the FCC; the agency must not only coordinate with the State Emergency Communications Committees to develop and modernize the State Emergency Alert System plans, but also expand alert distribution to internet and streaming services by examining the feasibility to the Emergency Alert System.

The second bill, H.R. 6624, the “Utilizing Strategic Allied (USA) Telecommunications Act of 2020,” creates a new grant program through the Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications Information Administration which will promote technology that “enhances supply chain security and market competitiveness in wireless communications networks.”

H.R. 7310, the “Spectrum IT Modernization Act of 2020,” requires NTIA to consult with the Policy and Plans Steering Group in the submission of a congressional report on its plans to modernize agency information technology systems relating to managing the use of federal spectrum.

Senate Commerce Committee clears several technology measures

The Senate Commerce Committee on Wednesday cleared about 13 bills, including several pertaining to technology and telecommunications, included S. 3969, Aircraft Safety and Certification Reform Act of 2020, which is designed to help the Federal Aviation Administration address safety assessments and oversight, including of the MCAST system.

Other bills passed included S. 1166, Internet Exchange Act of 2019, sponsored by Sens. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., and Roy Blunt, R-Mo.; S. 4803, Beat China by Harnessing Important, National Airwaves (CHINA) for 5G Act of 2020, sponsored by Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Roger Wicker, R-Miss. and John Thune, R-S.D.; and S. 4472, Ensuring Network Security Act, sponsored by Sens. Gary Peters, D-Mich., Ron Johnson, R-Wis., and Blunt.

Open RAN may facilitate protectionism in the name of competition

While support for the framework of open Radio Access Networks has grown in popularity since the U.S. banned Huawei and ZTE equipment, this industry concept may not create the open and diverse market operators are looking for, according to a blog post written by AEI Adjunct Scholar Bronwyn Howell on Wednesday.

In the past, key network equipment, both core network and in the RAN, were sold together. This allowed providers like Nokia, Ericsson, Samsung and Huawei to build sophisticated, efficient, high-performing systems with end-to-end accountability combining both hardware and software to manage mobile data transmissions, explained Howell.

She projected that the removal of Huawei and ZTE from the market in many Western democracies might cause the remaining operators to either increase prices or slow the rate of innovation components.

That’s why many are favoring the open RAN model right now, she said. It disaggregates hardware and software components operators are able to combine components from different vendors, resulting in competition in element supply, potential price reductions, greater innovation, and faster delivery of new features to consumers.

It is in places where governments have banned Huawei and ZTE that are favoring open RAN even more.

Indeed, some have suggested to the FCC that taxpayer dollars to be put toward the start of an open RAN network. Commissioner Michael O’Rielly said that the FCC does not have authority to impose network design requirements on the private sector.

Broadband Roundup

Veterans’ Affairs Pilots 5G, Bill de Blasio and Verizon, Chattanooga Free Internet, New WISPA Board

Jericho Casper

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Photo of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio from NY1

New Secure Telephone Identity Governance Authority Policies mitigate robocalls, Pallone and Doyle praise the passage of bills that will strengthen the communications network, O-RAN facilitating protectionism in the name of competition, Senate corrects MCAST system

The Secure Telephone Identity Governance Authority announced new policies to advance the STIR/SHAKEN protocol in the fight against illegal robocalls.

Through STIR/SHAKEN cryptographic system, service providers can mark calls with digital certificates and verify the accuracy of caller ID. The STI-GA gives service providers a way to collaborate as they ensure that only approved service providers are enrolled in the SHAKEN ecosystem.

The STI-GA recently updated their service provider code token access policy so that all service providers are required to certify with the Federal Communications Commission that they have either implemented STIR/SHAKEN or have a robocall mitigation program certification on file with the FCC.

This also includes an Operating Company Number and the FCC’s 499A report, the form used by the FCC and its Universal Service Administrative Company to track revenues of telecommunications service providers.

Until the FCC makes the portal available for service providers to file certifications, this new policy will not go into effect. The portal is projected to be open around March 31, 2021, and until then the current SPC token access policy will remain.

Pallone and Doyle praise the passage of bills that will strengthen the communications network

Energy and Commerce Chairman Frank Pallone, Jr., D-N.J., and Communications Subcommittee Chairman Mike Doyle, D-Penn., issued the following statement yesterday about three bills passed in the House of Representatives: “From keeping Americans better informed during emergencies to promoting 5G coordination, competitiveness and security, these three bills will create a better, safer communications network for us all. ”

The first bill, H.R. 6096, the “Reliable Emergency Alert Distribution Improvement (READI) Act of 2020,” amends the Warning, Alert, and Response Network Act, classifying emergency alerts from the Federal Emergency Management Agency as a type of alert that commercial mobile service providers cannot allow subscribers to block from their devices. The bill has several requirements for the FCC; the agency must not only coordinate with the State Emergency Communications Committees to develop and modernize the State Emergency Alert System plans, but also expand alert distribution to internet and streaming services by examining the feasibility to the Emergency Alert System.

The second bill, H.R. 6624, the “Utilizing Strategic Allied (USA) Telecommunications Act of 2020,” creates a new grant program through the Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications Information Administration which will promote technology that “enhances supply chain security and market competitiveness in wireless communications networks.”

H.R. 7310, the “Spectrum IT Modernization Act of 2020,” requires NTIA to consult with the Policy and Plans Steering Group in the submission of a congressional report on its plans to modernize agency information technology systems relating to managing the use of federal spectrum.

Senate Commerce Committee clears several technology measures

The Senate Commerce Committee on Wednesday cleared about 13 bills, including several pertaining to technology and telecommunications, included S. 3969, Aircraft Safety and Certification Reform Act of 2020, which is designed to help the Federal Aviation Administration address safety assessments and oversight, including of the MCAST system.

Other bills passed included S. 1166, Internet Exchange Act of 2019, sponsored by Sens. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., and Roy Blunt, R-Mo.; S. 4803, Beat China by Harnessing Important, National Airwaves (CHINA) for 5G Act of 2020, sponsored by Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Roger Wicker, R-Miss. and John Thune, R-S.D.; and S. 4472, Ensuring Network Security Act, sponsored by Sens. Gary Peters, D-Mich., Ron Johnson, R-Wis., and Blunt.

Open RAN may facilitate protectionism in the name of competition

While support for the framework of open Radio Access Networks has grown in popularity since the U.S. banned Huawei and ZTE equipment, this industry concept may not create the open and diverse market operators are looking for, according to a blog post written by AEI Adjunct Scholar Bronwyn Howell on Wednesday.

In the past, key network equipment, both core network and in the RAN, were sold together. This allowed providers like Nokia, Ericsson, Samsung and Huawei to build sophisticated, efficient, high-performing systems with end-to-end accountability combining both hardware and software to manage mobile data transmissions, explained Howell.

She projected that the removal of Huawei and ZTE from the market in many Western democracies might cause the remaining operators to either increase prices or slow the rate of innovation components.

That’s why many are favoring the open RAN model right now, she said. It disaggregates hardware and software components operators are able to combine components from different vendors, resulting in competition in element supply, potential price reductions, greater innovation, and faster delivery of new features to consumers.

It is in places where governments have banned Huawei and ZTE that are favoring open RAN even more.

Indeed, some have suggested to the FCC that taxpayer dollars to be put toward the start of an open RAN network. Commissioner Michael O’Rielly said that the FCC does not have authority to impose network design requirements on the private sector.

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Broadband Roundup

FTC’s Zoom Deal and Democrats, Vertical Bridge Buys Eco-site, Bill Would Extend CARES Act to 2021

Liana Sowa

Published

on

Photo of Zoom offices from My Tech Decisions

New Secure Telephone Identity Governance Authority Policies mitigate robocalls, Pallone and Doyle praise the passage of bills that will strengthen the communications network, O-RAN facilitating protectionism in the name of competition, Senate corrects MCAST system

The Secure Telephone Identity Governance Authority announced new policies to advance the STIR/SHAKEN protocol in the fight against illegal robocalls.

Through STIR/SHAKEN cryptographic system, service providers can mark calls with digital certificates and verify the accuracy of caller ID. The STI-GA gives service providers a way to collaborate as they ensure that only approved service providers are enrolled in the SHAKEN ecosystem.

The STI-GA recently updated their service provider code token access policy so that all service providers are required to certify with the Federal Communications Commission that they have either implemented STIR/SHAKEN or have a robocall mitigation program certification on file with the FCC.

This also includes an Operating Company Number and the FCC’s 499A report, the form used by the FCC and its Universal Service Administrative Company to track revenues of telecommunications service providers.

Until the FCC makes the portal available for service providers to file certifications, this new policy will not go into effect. The portal is projected to be open around March 31, 2021, and until then the current SPC token access policy will remain.

Pallone and Doyle praise the passage of bills that will strengthen the communications network

Energy and Commerce Chairman Frank Pallone, Jr., D-N.J., and Communications Subcommittee Chairman Mike Doyle, D-Penn., issued the following statement yesterday about three bills passed in the House of Representatives: “From keeping Americans better informed during emergencies to promoting 5G coordination, competitiveness and security, these three bills will create a better, safer communications network for us all. ”

The first bill, H.R. 6096, the “Reliable Emergency Alert Distribution Improvement (READI) Act of 2020,” amends the Warning, Alert, and Response Network Act, classifying emergency alerts from the Federal Emergency Management Agency as a type of alert that commercial mobile service providers cannot allow subscribers to block from their devices. The bill has several requirements for the FCC; the agency must not only coordinate with the State Emergency Communications Committees to develop and modernize the State Emergency Alert System plans, but also expand alert distribution to internet and streaming services by examining the feasibility to the Emergency Alert System.

The second bill, H.R. 6624, the “Utilizing Strategic Allied (USA) Telecommunications Act of 2020,” creates a new grant program through the Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications Information Administration which will promote technology that “enhances supply chain security and market competitiveness in wireless communications networks.”

H.R. 7310, the “Spectrum IT Modernization Act of 2020,” requires NTIA to consult with the Policy and Plans Steering Group in the submission of a congressional report on its plans to modernize agency information technology systems relating to managing the use of federal spectrum.

Senate Commerce Committee clears several technology measures

The Senate Commerce Committee on Wednesday cleared about 13 bills, including several pertaining to technology and telecommunications, included S. 3969, Aircraft Safety and Certification Reform Act of 2020, which is designed to help the Federal Aviation Administration address safety assessments and oversight, including of the MCAST system.

Other bills passed included S. 1166, Internet Exchange Act of 2019, sponsored by Sens. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., and Roy Blunt, R-Mo.; S. 4803, Beat China by Harnessing Important, National Airwaves (CHINA) for 5G Act of 2020, sponsored by Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Roger Wicker, R-Miss. and John Thune, R-S.D.; and S. 4472, Ensuring Network Security Act, sponsored by Sens. Gary Peters, D-Mich., Ron Johnson, R-Wis., and Blunt.

Open RAN may facilitate protectionism in the name of competition

While support for the framework of open Radio Access Networks has grown in popularity since the U.S. banned Huawei and ZTE equipment, this industry concept may not create the open and diverse market operators are looking for, according to a blog post written by AEI Adjunct Scholar Bronwyn Howell on Wednesday.

In the past, key network equipment, both core network and in the RAN, were sold together. This allowed providers like Nokia, Ericsson, Samsung and Huawei to build sophisticated, efficient, high-performing systems with end-to-end accountability combining both hardware and software to manage mobile data transmissions, explained Howell.

She projected that the removal of Huawei and ZTE from the market in many Western democracies might cause the remaining operators to either increase prices or slow the rate of innovation components.

That’s why many are favoring the open RAN model right now, she said. It disaggregates hardware and software components operators are able to combine components from different vendors, resulting in competition in element supply, potential price reductions, greater innovation, and faster delivery of new features to consumers.

It is in places where governments have banned Huawei and ZTE that are favoring open RAN even more.

Indeed, some have suggested to the FCC that taxpayer dollars to be put toward the start of an open RAN network. Commissioner Michael O’Rielly said that the FCC does not have authority to impose network design requirements on the private sector.

Continue Reading

Broadband Roundup

Biden Wants $4 Billion for Broadband, House Commerce Wants ‘Rip and Replace’, Maine Launches Speedtest

Jericho Casper

Published

on

Photo of Joe Biden from August 2019 by Gage Skidmore used with permission

New Secure Telephone Identity Governance Authority Policies mitigate robocalls, Pallone and Doyle praise the passage of bills that will strengthen the communications network, O-RAN facilitating protectionism in the name of competition, Senate corrects MCAST system

The Secure Telephone Identity Governance Authority announced new policies to advance the STIR/SHAKEN protocol in the fight against illegal robocalls.

Through STIR/SHAKEN cryptographic system, service providers can mark calls with digital certificates and verify the accuracy of caller ID. The STI-GA gives service providers a way to collaborate as they ensure that only approved service providers are enrolled in the SHAKEN ecosystem.

The STI-GA recently updated their service provider code token access policy so that all service providers are required to certify with the Federal Communications Commission that they have either implemented STIR/SHAKEN or have a robocall mitigation program certification on file with the FCC.

This also includes an Operating Company Number and the FCC’s 499A report, the form used by the FCC and its Universal Service Administrative Company to track revenues of telecommunications service providers.

Until the FCC makes the portal available for service providers to file certifications, this new policy will not go into effect. The portal is projected to be open around March 31, 2021, and until then the current SPC token access policy will remain.

Pallone and Doyle praise the passage of bills that will strengthen the communications network

Energy and Commerce Chairman Frank Pallone, Jr., D-N.J., and Communications Subcommittee Chairman Mike Doyle, D-Penn., issued the following statement yesterday about three bills passed in the House of Representatives: “From keeping Americans better informed during emergencies to promoting 5G coordination, competitiveness and security, these three bills will create a better, safer communications network for us all. ”

The first bill, H.R. 6096, the “Reliable Emergency Alert Distribution Improvement (READI) Act of 2020,” amends the Warning, Alert, and Response Network Act, classifying emergency alerts from the Federal Emergency Management Agency as a type of alert that commercial mobile service providers cannot allow subscribers to block from their devices. The bill has several requirements for the FCC; the agency must not only coordinate with the State Emergency Communications Committees to develop and modernize the State Emergency Alert System plans, but also expand alert distribution to internet and streaming services by examining the feasibility to the Emergency Alert System.

The second bill, H.R. 6624, the “Utilizing Strategic Allied (USA) Telecommunications Act of 2020,” creates a new grant program through the Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications Information Administration which will promote technology that “enhances supply chain security and market competitiveness in wireless communications networks.”

H.R. 7310, the “Spectrum IT Modernization Act of 2020,” requires NTIA to consult with the Policy and Plans Steering Group in the submission of a congressional report on its plans to modernize agency information technology systems relating to managing the use of federal spectrum.

Senate Commerce Committee clears several technology measures

The Senate Commerce Committee on Wednesday cleared about 13 bills, including several pertaining to technology and telecommunications, included S. 3969, Aircraft Safety and Certification Reform Act of 2020, which is designed to help the Federal Aviation Administration address safety assessments and oversight, including of the MCAST system.

Other bills passed included S. 1166, Internet Exchange Act of 2019, sponsored by Sens. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., and Roy Blunt, R-Mo.; S. 4803, Beat China by Harnessing Important, National Airwaves (CHINA) for 5G Act of 2020, sponsored by Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Roger Wicker, R-Miss. and John Thune, R-S.D.; and S. 4472, Ensuring Network Security Act, sponsored by Sens. Gary Peters, D-Mich., Ron Johnson, R-Wis., and Blunt.

Open RAN may facilitate protectionism in the name of competition

While support for the framework of open Radio Access Networks has grown in popularity since the U.S. banned Huawei and ZTE equipment, this industry concept may not create the open and diverse market operators are looking for, according to a blog post written by AEI Adjunct Scholar Bronwyn Howell on Wednesday.

In the past, key network equipment, both core network and in the RAN, were sold together. This allowed providers like Nokia, Ericsson, Samsung and Huawei to build sophisticated, efficient, high-performing systems with end-to-end accountability combining both hardware and software to manage mobile data transmissions, explained Howell.

She projected that the removal of Huawei and ZTE from the market in many Western democracies might cause the remaining operators to either increase prices or slow the rate of innovation components.

That’s why many are favoring the open RAN model right now, she said. It disaggregates hardware and software components operators are able to combine components from different vendors, resulting in competition in element supply, potential price reductions, greater innovation, and faster delivery of new features to consumers.

It is in places where governments have banned Huawei and ZTE that are favoring open RAN even more.

Indeed, some have suggested to the FCC that taxpayer dollars to be put toward the start of an open RAN network. Commissioner Michael O’Rielly said that the FCC does not have authority to impose network design requirements on the private sector.

Continue Reading

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