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Digital Museums and Smart Cities: Verizon CEO Explores 5G Potential Beyond Just a Better Smartphone

Tim White

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Photo of Hans Vestberg at the 2021 Consumer Electronics Show

January 11, 2021 – “It just gets better!” So declared Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg, as he demonstrated how 5G technology is digitally transforming the world in his keynote for the all-digital 2021 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

5G is more than just another technology innovation, he said. It is technology that allows other technology innovations to occur, he explained, thanks to faster speeds and higher capacity for connected devices.

Vestberg, who gave the Verizon keynote at CES in 2019 as well, again promised that 5G would change everything. Now, he’s trying to deliver on that promise.

Two years ago, Vestberg talked about 5G as the fourth industrial revolution. On Monday, he said the COVID-19 pandemic and other social crises have changed the world and accelerated the adoption of technology by governments, businesses, and individuals.

Revisiting the “currencies” of 5G from his previous keynote, Vestberg focused on capabilities that will benefit as 5G is deployed. These include faster speeds, higher capacities, and mobile edge computing, which improving latency for users by using more cloud computing.

But, he said, that’s just the start.

Through a series of live and digital conversations with guests, Vestberg discussed sports, education, business and entertainment:

Deion Sanders of the NFL hall of fame joined him on stage to discuss how Verizon and the NFL are using 5G to improve sports viewing, allowing fans to get closer to the game with seven different camera angles and real-time stats.

Vestberg and the Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch also showcased different ways in which the new technology benefits education by reaching more people than ever before. The Smithsonian can digitally capture and display different exhibits for students, allowing them to experience the museums from long distance.

Rose Kirk, Verizon’s Social Responsibility Officer, explained how the company is using digital 5G to reach more students and improve digital learning through virtual and augmented reality. For example, students could visit different planets in the solar system in a science class through a VR program.

Verizon’s vice president of technology development and the carrier’s 5G labs Sanyogita Shamsunder explained how 5G can enhance robotics that require fast capture and transmission of large amounts of data.

Skyward’s Mariah Scott and Carol Tomé from UPS also described how they are using 5G for drones, and working with UPS’s Flight Forward delivery program.

Vestberg finished the keynote with a conversation with the music group Black Pumas, speaking about their experience using motion capture to create an AR music video. He also discussed music and enhancing live music venues around the country with 5G technology, when they reopen once the COVID-19 disease is contained.

5G

Andrew Drozd: Monetizing Spectrum Sharing, in Addition to Network Utilization, is Key to 5G

Broadband Breakfast Staff

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The author of this Expert Opinion is Andrew Drozd, CEO of ANDRO Computational Systems

January 11, 2021 – “It just gets better!” So declared Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg, as he demonstrated how 5G technology is digitally transforming the world in his keynote for the all-digital 2021 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

5G is more than just another technology innovation, he said. It is technology that allows other technology innovations to occur, he explained, thanks to faster speeds and higher capacity for connected devices.

Vestberg, who gave the Verizon keynote at CES in 2019 as well, again promised that 5G would change everything. Now, he’s trying to deliver on that promise.

Two years ago, Vestberg talked about 5G as the fourth industrial revolution. On Monday, he said the COVID-19 pandemic and other social crises have changed the world and accelerated the adoption of technology by governments, businesses, and individuals.

Revisiting the “currencies” of 5G from his previous keynote, Vestberg focused on capabilities that will benefit as 5G is deployed. These include faster speeds, higher capacities, and mobile edge computing, which improving latency for users by using more cloud computing.

But, he said, that’s just the start.

Through a series of live and digital conversations with guests, Vestberg discussed sports, education, business and entertainment:

Deion Sanders of the NFL hall of fame joined him on stage to discuss how Verizon and the NFL are using 5G to improve sports viewing, allowing fans to get closer to the game with seven different camera angles and real-time stats.

Vestberg and the Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch also showcased different ways in which the new technology benefits education by reaching more people than ever before. The Smithsonian can digitally capture and display different exhibits for students, allowing them to experience the museums from long distance.

Rose Kirk, Verizon’s Social Responsibility Officer, explained how the company is using digital 5G to reach more students and improve digital learning through virtual and augmented reality. For example, students could visit different planets in the solar system in a science class through a VR program.

Verizon’s vice president of technology development and the carrier’s 5G labs Sanyogita Shamsunder explained how 5G can enhance robotics that require fast capture and transmission of large amounts of data.

Skyward’s Mariah Scott and Carol Tomé from UPS also described how they are using 5G for drones, and working with UPS’s Flight Forward delivery program.

Vestberg finished the keynote with a conversation with the music group Black Pumas, speaking about their experience using motion capture to create an AR music video. He also discussed music and enhancing live music venues around the country with 5G technology, when they reopen once the COVID-19 disease is contained.

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5G

In A Debate Over Municipal Rights-Of-Way, Industry and Public Representatives Attempt to Find A Path Forward

Jericho Casper

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January 11, 2021 – “It just gets better!” So declared Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg, as he demonstrated how 5G technology is digitally transforming the world in his keynote for the all-digital 2021 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

5G is more than just another technology innovation, he said. It is technology that allows other technology innovations to occur, he explained, thanks to faster speeds and higher capacity for connected devices.

Vestberg, who gave the Verizon keynote at CES in 2019 as well, again promised that 5G would change everything. Now, he’s trying to deliver on that promise.

Two years ago, Vestberg talked about 5G as the fourth industrial revolution. On Monday, he said the COVID-19 pandemic and other social crises have changed the world and accelerated the adoption of technology by governments, businesses, and individuals.

Revisiting the “currencies” of 5G from his previous keynote, Vestberg focused on capabilities that will benefit as 5G is deployed. These include faster speeds, higher capacities, and mobile edge computing, which improving latency for users by using more cloud computing.

But, he said, that’s just the start.

Through a series of live and digital conversations with guests, Vestberg discussed sports, education, business and entertainment:

Deion Sanders of the NFL hall of fame joined him on stage to discuss how Verizon and the NFL are using 5G to improve sports viewing, allowing fans to get closer to the game with seven different camera angles and real-time stats.

Vestberg and the Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch also showcased different ways in which the new technology benefits education by reaching more people than ever before. The Smithsonian can digitally capture and display different exhibits for students, allowing them to experience the museums from long distance.

Rose Kirk, Verizon’s Social Responsibility Officer, explained how the company is using digital 5G to reach more students and improve digital learning through virtual and augmented reality. For example, students could visit different planets in the solar system in a science class through a VR program.

Verizon’s vice president of technology development and the carrier’s 5G labs Sanyogita Shamsunder explained how 5G can enhance robotics that require fast capture and transmission of large amounts of data.

Skyward’s Mariah Scott and Carol Tomé from UPS also described how they are using 5G for drones, and working with UPS’s Flight Forward delivery program.

Vestberg finished the keynote with a conversation with the music group Black Pumas, speaking about their experience using motion capture to create an AR music video. He also discussed music and enhancing live music venues around the country with 5G technology, when they reopen once the COVID-19 disease is contained.

Continue Reading

5G

Jimmy Jones: UK Telecom Security Bills Drive Global Regulation and Network Security Standards Beyond 5G

Broadband Breakfast Staff

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on

The author of this Expert Opinion is Jimmy Jones, a telecom cybersecurity expert for Positive Technologies

January 11, 2021 – “It just gets better!” So declared Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg, as he demonstrated how 5G technology is digitally transforming the world in his keynote for the all-digital 2021 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

5G is more than just another technology innovation, he said. It is technology that allows other technology innovations to occur, he explained, thanks to faster speeds and higher capacity for connected devices.

Vestberg, who gave the Verizon keynote at CES in 2019 as well, again promised that 5G would change everything. Now, he’s trying to deliver on that promise.

Two years ago, Vestberg talked about 5G as the fourth industrial revolution. On Monday, he said the COVID-19 pandemic and other social crises have changed the world and accelerated the adoption of technology by governments, businesses, and individuals.

Revisiting the “currencies” of 5G from his previous keynote, Vestberg focused on capabilities that will benefit as 5G is deployed. These include faster speeds, higher capacities, and mobile edge computing, which improving latency for users by using more cloud computing.

But, he said, that’s just the start.

Through a series of live and digital conversations with guests, Vestberg discussed sports, education, business and entertainment:

Deion Sanders of the NFL hall of fame joined him on stage to discuss how Verizon and the NFL are using 5G to improve sports viewing, allowing fans to get closer to the game with seven different camera angles and real-time stats.

Vestberg and the Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch also showcased different ways in which the new technology benefits education by reaching more people than ever before. The Smithsonian can digitally capture and display different exhibits for students, allowing them to experience the museums from long distance.

Rose Kirk, Verizon’s Social Responsibility Officer, explained how the company is using digital 5G to reach more students and improve digital learning through virtual and augmented reality. For example, students could visit different planets in the solar system in a science class through a VR program.

Verizon’s vice president of technology development and the carrier’s 5G labs Sanyogita Shamsunder explained how 5G can enhance robotics that require fast capture and transmission of large amounts of data.

Skyward’s Mariah Scott and Carol Tomé from UPS also described how they are using 5G for drones, and working with UPS’s Flight Forward delivery program.

Vestberg finished the keynote with a conversation with the music group Black Pumas, speaking about their experience using motion capture to create an AR music video. He also discussed music and enhancing live music venues around the country with 5G technology, when they reopen once the COVID-19 disease is contained.

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