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Pandemic’s Focus on Wi-Fi Bottlenecks Lights a Fire Under Next-Generation Wireless in Homes

Benjamin Kahn

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Screenshot of from "What's Next for Wi-Fi?"

February 22, 2021—Wi-Fi capacity at home has become a focal point during the pandemic, which makes getting ahead of the next-generation of the technology crucial, experts said at a panel on February 9.

That includes releasing valuable spectrum to enhance capacity of the new sixth-generation and beyond of Wi-Fi so more devices at home can be connected at the highest speeds the internet speeds allow.

The Federal Communications Commission has already opened up the 1200 MegaHertz (MHz) spectrum, said Kevin Robinson, senior vice president of marketing for the Wi-Fi Alliance. He noted that the ongoing pandemic made it clear how vital a role Wi-Fi connectivity plays in the everyday lives of people all around the world.

“That momentum is going to continue to grow,” Robinson said, adding that he expects the European Commission to take similar actions in the first quarter of this year.

Robinson said many countries, from the U.S., to South Korea, to the U.A.E., are expanding the bandwidth available to consumers to accommodate the number of people who are telecommuting to work and school, along with the influx of people who are utilizing telehealth services.

Chris Dupuy, deputy chief technology analyst of 650 Group, explained that for the past 20 years the Wi-Fi market has grown, and that as of this year 25 percent of wireless access points were using sixth generation Wi-Fi technology.

Additionally, he stated that 15 percent of consumer infrastructure was also operating under 6E technology. Dupuy also forecasted that according to his data, 28 percent of wireless access points and 27 percent percent of consumer infrastructure will be operating on 6E technology.

Dupuy also claimed that the first 7E technology will begin being shipped to consumers in 2023.

More spectrum needed for Wi-Fi capacity

Growing the spectrum is one of the chief concerns for Derek Peterson, chief technology officer for Boingo Wireless. Peterson acknowledged that while there are lots of useful tools used for digital modulation, their usefulness is somewhat moot without expanding the spectrum.

“With Wi-Fi 6E you get that [increase in spectrum] to be able to deploy across an area,” he said.

But coverage is not the only concern. Peterson also said Wi-Fi density is becoming an increasing issue as more devices are being added to households around the world.

“The way we solve that issue is with more spectrum ,” he said. “We’re going to have less interference and we’re going to end up with that low latency for all of the devices we need,” with newer Wi-Fi technologies.

New Wi-Fi will expand on, not replace, previous tech

Intel’s chief technology officer of Wireless Communications Carlos Cordeiro said that his view is that multiple technologies from different generations are going to have to be made to work together for the industry to continue to move forward.

“For us, it is an ‘all of the above mentality,’” he said. “No technology kills the other.” Cordeiro explained that it is about identifying the best of what each technology has to offer and trying to get them to work together.

Spectrum

FCC Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel Proposes Opening Mid-Band Spectrum For Sharing

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

Photo of FCC Acting Chairman Jessica Rosenworcel

February 22, 2021—Wi-Fi capacity at home has become a focal point during the pandemic, which makes getting ahead of the next-generation of the technology crucial, experts said at a panel on February 9.

That includes releasing valuable spectrum to enhance capacity of the new sixth-generation and beyond of Wi-Fi so more devices at home can be connected at the highest speeds the internet speeds allow.

The Federal Communications Commission has already opened up the 1200 MegaHertz (MHz) spectrum, said Kevin Robinson, senior vice president of marketing for the Wi-Fi Alliance. He noted that the ongoing pandemic made it clear how vital a role Wi-Fi connectivity plays in the everyday lives of people all around the world.

“That momentum is going to continue to grow,” Robinson said, adding that he expects the European Commission to take similar actions in the first quarter of this year.

Robinson said many countries, from the U.S., to South Korea, to the U.A.E., are expanding the bandwidth available to consumers to accommodate the number of people who are telecommuting to work and school, along with the influx of people who are utilizing telehealth services.

Chris Dupuy, deputy chief technology analyst of 650 Group, explained that for the past 20 years the Wi-Fi market has grown, and that as of this year 25 percent of wireless access points were using sixth generation Wi-Fi technology.

Additionally, he stated that 15 percent of consumer infrastructure was also operating under 6E technology. Dupuy also forecasted that according to his data, 28 percent of wireless access points and 27 percent percent of consumer infrastructure will be operating on 6E technology.

Dupuy also claimed that the first 7E technology will begin being shipped to consumers in 2023.

More spectrum needed for Wi-Fi capacity

Growing the spectrum is one of the chief concerns for Derek Peterson, chief technology officer for Boingo Wireless. Peterson acknowledged that while there are lots of useful tools used for digital modulation, their usefulness is somewhat moot without expanding the spectrum.

“With Wi-Fi 6E you get that [increase in spectrum] to be able to deploy across an area,” he said.

But coverage is not the only concern. Peterson also said Wi-Fi density is becoming an increasing issue as more devices are being added to households around the world.

“The way we solve that issue is with more spectrum ,” he said. “We’re going to have less interference and we’re going to end up with that low latency for all of the devices we need,” with newer Wi-Fi technologies.

New Wi-Fi will expand on, not replace, previous tech

Intel’s chief technology officer of Wireless Communications Carlos Cordeiro said that his view is that multiple technologies from different generations are going to have to be made to work together for the industry to continue to move forward.

“For us, it is an ‘all of the above mentality,’” he said. “No technology kills the other.” Cordeiro explained that it is about identifying the best of what each technology has to offer and trying to get them to work together.

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Spectrum

In Session at TPRC, Michael Calabrese of New America Emphasizes Vital Role of Spectrum Sharing

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

Screenshot of Michael Calabrese from the webinar

February 22, 2021—Wi-Fi capacity at home has become a focal point during the pandemic, which makes getting ahead of the next-generation of the technology crucial, experts said at a panel on February 9.

That includes releasing valuable spectrum to enhance capacity of the new sixth-generation and beyond of Wi-Fi so more devices at home can be connected at the highest speeds the internet speeds allow.

The Federal Communications Commission has already opened up the 1200 MegaHertz (MHz) spectrum, said Kevin Robinson, senior vice president of marketing for the Wi-Fi Alliance. He noted that the ongoing pandemic made it clear how vital a role Wi-Fi connectivity plays in the everyday lives of people all around the world.

“That momentum is going to continue to grow,” Robinson said, adding that he expects the European Commission to take similar actions in the first quarter of this year.

Robinson said many countries, from the U.S., to South Korea, to the U.A.E., are expanding the bandwidth available to consumers to accommodate the number of people who are telecommuting to work and school, along with the influx of people who are utilizing telehealth services.

Chris Dupuy, deputy chief technology analyst of 650 Group, explained that for the past 20 years the Wi-Fi market has grown, and that as of this year 25 percent of wireless access points were using sixth generation Wi-Fi technology.

Additionally, he stated that 15 percent of consumer infrastructure was also operating under 6E technology. Dupuy also forecasted that according to his data, 28 percent of wireless access points and 27 percent percent of consumer infrastructure will be operating on 6E technology.

Dupuy also claimed that the first 7E technology will begin being shipped to consumers in 2023.

More spectrum needed for Wi-Fi capacity

Growing the spectrum is one of the chief concerns for Derek Peterson, chief technology officer for Boingo Wireless. Peterson acknowledged that while there are lots of useful tools used for digital modulation, their usefulness is somewhat moot without expanding the spectrum.

“With Wi-Fi 6E you get that [increase in spectrum] to be able to deploy across an area,” he said.

But coverage is not the only concern. Peterson also said Wi-Fi density is becoming an increasing issue as more devices are being added to households around the world.

“The way we solve that issue is with more spectrum ,” he said. “We’re going to have less interference and we’re going to end up with that low latency for all of the devices we need,” with newer Wi-Fi technologies.

New Wi-Fi will expand on, not replace, previous tech

Intel’s chief technology officer of Wireless Communications Carlos Cordeiro said that his view is that multiple technologies from different generations are going to have to be made to work together for the industry to continue to move forward.

“For us, it is an ‘all of the above mentality,’” he said. “No technology kills the other.” Cordeiro explained that it is about identifying the best of what each technology has to offer and trying to get them to work together.

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FCC

Three Federal Agencies Partner to Promote Cooperation in Radiofrequency Spectrum Innovation

Samuel Triginelli

Published

on

Screenshot of now-Acting NTIA Administrator Evelyn Remaley in November 2017 from Twitter 

February 22, 2021—Wi-Fi capacity at home has become a focal point during the pandemic, which makes getting ahead of the next-generation of the technology crucial, experts said at a panel on February 9.

That includes releasing valuable spectrum to enhance capacity of the new sixth-generation and beyond of Wi-Fi so more devices at home can be connected at the highest speeds the internet speeds allow.

The Federal Communications Commission has already opened up the 1200 MegaHertz (MHz) spectrum, said Kevin Robinson, senior vice president of marketing for the Wi-Fi Alliance. He noted that the ongoing pandemic made it clear how vital a role Wi-Fi connectivity plays in the everyday lives of people all around the world.

“That momentum is going to continue to grow,” Robinson said, adding that he expects the European Commission to take similar actions in the first quarter of this year.

Robinson said many countries, from the U.S., to South Korea, to the U.A.E., are expanding the bandwidth available to consumers to accommodate the number of people who are telecommuting to work and school, along with the influx of people who are utilizing telehealth services.

Chris Dupuy, deputy chief technology analyst of 650 Group, explained that for the past 20 years the Wi-Fi market has grown, and that as of this year 25 percent of wireless access points were using sixth generation Wi-Fi technology.

Additionally, he stated that 15 percent of consumer infrastructure was also operating under 6E technology. Dupuy also forecasted that according to his data, 28 percent of wireless access points and 27 percent percent of consumer infrastructure will be operating on 6E technology.

Dupuy also claimed that the first 7E technology will begin being shipped to consumers in 2023.

More spectrum needed for Wi-Fi capacity

Growing the spectrum is one of the chief concerns for Derek Peterson, chief technology officer for Boingo Wireless. Peterson acknowledged that while there are lots of useful tools used for digital modulation, their usefulness is somewhat moot without expanding the spectrum.

“With Wi-Fi 6E you get that [increase in spectrum] to be able to deploy across an area,” he said.

But coverage is not the only concern. Peterson also said Wi-Fi density is becoming an increasing issue as more devices are being added to households around the world.

“The way we solve that issue is with more spectrum ,” he said. “We’re going to have less interference and we’re going to end up with that low latency for all of the devices we need,” with newer Wi-Fi technologies.

New Wi-Fi will expand on, not replace, previous tech

Intel’s chief technology officer of Wireless Communications Carlos Cordeiro said that his view is that multiple technologies from different generations are going to have to be made to work together for the industry to continue to move forward.

“For us, it is an ‘all of the above mentality,’” he said. “No technology kills the other.” Cordeiro explained that it is about identifying the best of what each technology has to offer and trying to get them to work together.

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