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Broadband People Column: Rey Ramsey to Leave One Economy for TechNet

in Broadband's Impact/Premium Content by

WASHINGTON, November 19, 2009 – Rey Ramsey, the head of non-profit organization One Economy Corp., is leaving to head the technology industry fundraising organization, the group said Thursday.

Ramsey will assume his new leadership role beginning in January. TechNet’s former president, Lezlee Westine, left the organization in May to head the Personal Care Products Council.

As the CEO of One Economy Corporation, a global nonprofit he co-founded in 2000 that works to leverage the power of technology to improve the lives of low-income people. He plans to continue to serve as chairman of the board for One Economy. Moustafa Mourad, who is currently president of One Global Economy, will serve as acting president of One Economy during the transition.

In the portions of this article included as Premium Content, the column reports further details about Ramsey’s new role at TechNet, plus news about the Federal Trade Commission, Google picking up a former Microsoft employee, plus news about the non-partisan independent project Expert Labs.

[Private_Premium Content][Private_Free Trial]Ramsey is co-author of the book ManagingNonprofits.org: Dynamic Management for the Digital Age. Prior to his work for One Economy, Ramsey practiced law and served as the state director of housing and community services in the cabinets of two Oregon governors. He holds a bachelors degree in political science from Rutgers University and is a graduate of the University of Virginia Law School.

In his new role at TechNet, Ramsey will be based in Washington, D.C., and will oversee the organization’s day-to-day operations, strategic planning and implementation of the group’s public policy and political agenda.

TechNet, a bipartisan network of CEOs that promotes the growth of technology industries, also announced Thursday that TechNet members Paul Otellini, president and CEO of Intel, and Eric Schmidt, chairman and CEO of Google, are joining the group’s executive committee.

Ohlhausen To Lead’s Firms FTC Practice

Maureen Ohlhausen is joining the Washington, D.C., communications law firm Wilkinson Barker Knauer as a partner. In her new role she will lead the firm’s Federal Trade Commission practice. Ohlhausen spent 11 years at the FTC including as director of the FTC’s Office of Policy Planning from 2004 to 2008. She last served as technology policy counsel for the Business Software Alliance.

Ohlhausen has been on the adjunct faculty at George Mason University School of Law and is a member of the American Bar Association Task Force on Competition and Public Policy.

Google Nabs ex-Microsoft Employee

Google has hired Dan Dodge who was recently laid off by Microsoft where he served as director of business development, he announced on his blog. Dodge spent nearly five years with Microsoft.

“I hope I played a small part in making Microsoft more approachable, friendly to startups, and easier to work with. Microsoft is a different company, a better company, than when I joined 5 years ago. There are more new people who joined Microsoft in the last 5 years than all the previous employees combined. However, laying off 5,000 people when you have $37 [billion] in cash and huge profits is not cool. But hey, thanks for pushing me on to the Next Big Thing,” wrote Dodge.

Dodge said he was contacted by Google 90 minutes after the news of his layoff broke. “That fast decisive action was refreshing, and such a contrast to the slow, secretive, bureaucracy at Microsoft,” he wrote.

Dodge’s job at Google will be helping developers and startups build great products and services using Google technology and platforms. He also noted in his blog that he is moving from Microsoft Outlook to Gmail, from Microsoft Office 2007 to Google Docs, from Microsoft Windows Mobile 6.5 to Google Android, and from Microsoft Internet Explorer to Google Chrome.

Anil Dash To Lead Expert Labs

Anil Dash will be leading Expert Labs, a nonpartisan, independent project that aims to improve the policy-making process by engaging experts and technologists, according to the New York Observer. The project is getting its support from a $500,000 grant from the MacArthur Foundation, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and their Policy Innovation Network.

Dash is the co-founder and “chief evangelist” for Six Apart, a company that creates the most popular blogging software in the world including the software that runs President Barack Obama’s blog.[/Private_Premium Content][/Private_Free Trial]

Regulators, Officials Debate Need for National Broadband Policy, Fund

in Broadband Data by

Editor’s Note: The following story was published in TR Daily on September 26, 2008, and is reprinted with the permission of Telecommunications Reports International, Inc. This article is and remains Copyright 2008 Telecommunications Reports International, Inc.

By Carrie DeLeon, Telecommunications Reports

A national broadband infrastructure fund should include the involvement of state regulators and focus not only on the extension of broadband service into unserved areas, but also on the adoption rate of broadband service by consumers, according to California Public Utilities Commissioner Rachelle Chong.

During a keynote address this morning at the Broadband Census for America Conference in Washington, Commissioner Chong advocated for the implementation of a national broadband infrastructure fund, and suggested that the Universal Service Fund be reformed to shift the focus from traditional wireline to advanced services.

“More assertive national leadership on broadband policy is not only necessary, but critical,” Commissioner Chong said.

In addition, the former FCC regulator said that while some states, including California, have been successful in their efforts to map broadband data, a national mapping of broadband data could be helpful to states by enabling them to compare their broadband efforts with other states.

Other participants in the conference, which was held at the Washington office of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, also saw the need for national leadership in some aspects of broadband policy, but said that ultimately states are responsible for broadband deployment.

Jane Smith Patterson, executive director, e-NC Authority, asserted that states are the most qualified to collect broadband data. “Assistance from the federal government is great, but ultimately the states are responsible for their own economic development,” Ms. Patterson said.

Similarly, Larry Landis, a member of the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission, pointed out that states have an “imperative to develop broadband that does not exist at the national level.”

On the other hand, William Lehr, an economist and researcher at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said that certain data needs to be collected at the federal level in order to validate the states’ efforts. The federal government is also more equipped to assist with resources and information sharing, “so a leadership role from the federal government is necessary,” he said.

In shifting the discussion to what a national or state broadband mapping project should look like, Commissioner Chong said it is very important to analyze the “take rate.” She said that if the take rate in certain areas is low, then policymakers need to determine what factors are causing that low adoption rate and think of solutions to address the problem.

“Getting broadband access is really just the first step,” Commissioner Chong said. “The affordability of that broadband access is the next big factor.” Jeffrey Campbell, senior director at Cisco Systems and a member of the California Broadband Task Force, agreed. “It doesn’t do any good to have broadband if no one is using it,” he said.

Mr. Campbell also stressed the importance of gathering broadband data at the household level. “It’s the kind of level of data we just have to have. You wouldn’t say 98% of people have electricity. Two percent do not … guess where they are,” Mr. Campbell said.

Several of the speakers during the conference discussed the need for a leader – whether it be the state legislature, the governor, or a community group on the local level – to champion for broadband and mapping. Commissioner Chong said that Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger (R.) “really put the spotlight on broadband” by forming a broadband task force and initiating the state broadband mapping project.

According to Commissioner Chong, it’s important to convince government leaders and lawmakers that broadband is a necessary part of the infrastructure. “If you don’t have broadband you’re not going to have a state-of-the-art business economy,” Commissioner Chong said. “We firmly believe that broadband is infrastructure, just like schools or levees are part of the infrastructure. So is broadband.”

“The leadership of the governor is very important. I also had to lobby the legislature,” Commissioner Chong said. “Lawmakers told me, ‘I think the Internet is a luxury so why should I tax consumers’ phone bills,’ and I had to convince them otherwise.”

The other huge challenge for state regulators is that they don’t regulate the Internet, Commissioner Chong pointed out. “So all I can do is encourage them to build out and try to provide incentives,” she added.

- Carrie DeLeon, carrie.deleon@wolterskluwer.com

TR Daily, September 26, 2008

Copyright © 2008, Telecommunications Reports International, Inc.

Proprietary Data Cited as Challenge for Broadband Mapping

in Broadband Data by

Editor’s Note: The following story was published in TR Daily on September 26, 2008, and is reprinted with the permission of Telecommunications Reports International, Inc. This article is and remains Copyright 2008 Telecommunications Reports International, Inc.

By Lynn Stanton, TR Daily

State and federal government programs to develop maps of broadband service availability at a granular level must overcome objections by carriers to revealing what they view as proprietary information, although carriers may actually find the resulting maps beneficial, panelists at the Broadband Census for America Conference said today.

Speaking at the conference held at the Washington office of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Art Brodsky, director-communications at Public Knowledge, criticized the carriers’ objections to broadband mapping projects by questioning the proprietary and competitive value of information on where carriers have already deployed broadband services. He noted that carriers are not being asked about future deployment plans, which would more clearly involve competitive concerns.

Drew Clark, executive director of BroadbandCensus.com, which was one of the sponsors of the conference, noted that the FCC and carriers have objected to attempts to obtain underlying carrier data on broadband deployment submitted to the FCC, arguing that disclosure causes competitive harm by permitting new entrants to better target those areas lacking broadband competition. Because the data submitted to the FCC has not been made publicly available, BroadbandCensus.com and others, including the Communication Workers of America’s Speed Matters program, have resorted to obtaining information directly from consumers, a process Mr. Clark termed “crowd-sourcing.” By submitting information on their own service at a particular location, and taking download and upload speed tests, individual users can participate in the development of broadband maps or databases.

Mr. Clark said the three purposes of BroadbandCensus.com are to aid the process of competition, serve policy-makers, and aid consumers.

Mark McElroy, chief operating officer of Connected Nation, said that a mapping program will be beneficial if it’s relevant to consumers, in that the map can tell them if they can get broadband at home; if it’s relevant to providers, in that it can let them know where and why they should extend their networks; and if it’s relevant to increased digital literacy, in that it can be used in conjunction with an effective demand stimulation effort.

Debbie Goldman, coordinator of the CWA’s Speed Matters, said that in developing broadband mapping and deployment policies, “the states are the laboratories because unfortunately we don’t have a national policy.”

Kenneth Flamm, a professor of public affairs the University of Texas-Austin, said that collecting information on broadband use “is a job actually for the federal government and the federal statistical agencies,” but that they lack adequate funding and don’t do a good job of keeping up with relatively new services. “There shouldn’t be an argument about whether the government going out to try to measure the state of the market is somehow infringing [on private companies] . . . There’s no private-public conflict here,” he added.

A member of the audience suggested the Internal Revenue Service and private online tax-filing companies could capture information on broadband connection rates with an “opt-in” speed-test at the time of filing. Mr. Flamm said that was a “clever idea.”

Speaking during the closing keynote, Eamonn Confrey, first secretary-information and communications policy at the Irish Embassy in Washington, explained his country’s broadband initiatives, which include its broadband.gov.ie website. The overall purpose of the site is to help consumers and small business, he said. While customers cannot order broadband service on the site, it does include links to broadband providers in their area. It also has a tool to check if digital subscriber line (DSL) service – the principal nonmobile broadband technology in Ireland – is available at the user’s fixed-line phone number.

The website also allows consumers “to register their demand for broadband,” so providers can see where there is demand.

“Initially, there was a lot of resistance from larger providers” to listing their services on the website, which is a voluntary process for providers, Mr. Confrey said. Eventually, however, they came to see it as a competitive disadvantage not to be listed there. The website “has proved to be a win-win for provider and consumer alike,” he added.

The government also recently launched a national broadband scheme to reach the remaining 10% of the population that does not have broadband service available, Mr. Confrey said. The government provides funding to induce broadband in those areas while setting requirements to ensure that “the winning company won’t be able to cherry-pick” within the contracted area.

Mr. Confrey emphasized that the Irish government views broadband deployment as “an economic competitiveness issue for us,” as the country seeks to retain employers like Yahoo, Inc., and Google, Inc., that are attracted by an English-speaking, “fairly well educated” workforce in Europe. “You simply won’t retain that kind of investment without the infrastructure,” he added.

- Lynn Stanton, lynn.stanton@wolterskluwer.com

TR Daily, September 26, 2008

Copyright © 2008, Telecommunications Reports International, Inc.

House Defers to Senate Broadband Data Bill; Final Bill Deletes Funding and National Map

in Broadband Data by

WASHINGTON, October 7 – Congress last week passed legislation, the “Broadband Data Improvement Act,” that seeks better information about high-speed internet connections through enhanced data collection by five separate government agencies.

But as passed by the Senate and the House, S. 1492 deleted all authorization of funds – an amount that had totaled $40 million for each of fiscal years 2008 through 2012 in the Senate Commerce Committee version of the legislation.

Although S. 1492 was agreed to by the House, the bill undercut many of the key features of a companion House bill, the “Broadband Census of America Act,” H.R. 3919.

H.R. 3919 passed the House in November 2007. It would have forced the disclosure of company-by-company broadband data. It also would have created a national broadband map under the aegis of the Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration, with details on broadband coverage by every broadband provider at the nine-digit ZIP code level. Both features are absent in the final bill.

The Senate finally passed S. 1492 on Friday, September 26 – the same day that many state officials and academics gathered in Washington at the “Broadband Census for America Conference” sponsored by BroadbandCensus.com, Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Texas at Austin and Virginia Tech’s eCorridors Program.

Until recently, Sen. Thomas Coburn, R-Okla., had opposed passage of S. 1492 on the grounds that the $40 million annual authorization was an unwarranted expenditure of federal monies.

The House passed a slightly-modified version of S. 1492 on Monday, September 29 – the same day that it initially rejected the $700 billion financial industry bailout package. Because of the changes, the Senate needed to clear the House-passed version. It did so last week, and the bill is currently before President Bush.

Sponsored by Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Daniel Inouye, D-Hawaii, the Broadband Data Improvement Act has received wide-spread support across Congress. At a September 16 hearing, Inouye said that the measure “will give us the baseline statistics we need in order to eventually achieve the successful deployment of broadband…to all Americans.”

Some House members expressed disappointment about S. 1492’s failure to require comprehensive mapping of broadband and reporting on commercial providers on the local level.

House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman John Dingell, D-Mich., agreed with Inouye’s statement on the positive impact better data could have. Through an aide, Dingell said he would have preferred to create a nationwide map of broadband infrastructure and “remains hopeful we can work towards that goal as the legislation is implemented.”

Rep. Ed Markey, D-Mass., Chairman of the Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet, expressed similar disappointment. In a statement, Markey said he “wish[ed] the Senate bill contained the more rigorous data collection and disclosure, as well as the mapping provisions that were contained in the House-passed bill.”

During House floor consideration of the bill on Monday, Markey was optimistic that such a comprehensive mapping effort might still be possible, arguing that “the Secretary of Commerce should create a website through the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) depicting broadband inventory maps of all the States as outlined in the House-passed bill.”

The Commerce Department is one of several federal agencies that will now be tasked with improving national data on broadband services and utilizing that data to improve policies to enhance and expand the technological infrastructure, including the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the Census Bureau (a nominally independent part of Commerce), the Government Accountability Office, and the Small Business Administration.

The Act also changes the language of the 1996 Telecommunications Act to require the FCC conduct an “annual” – in place of a “regular” – inquiry into broadband deployment and to list of all the 5-digit ZIP codes where broadband is not available in the U.S.

The reach of the Broadband Data Improvement Act could be global: the FCC is also directed to conduct studies on broadband services in 25 other nations and to report on difference and similarities between these nations and the U.S.

Likewise, the Census Bureau will have to expand its studies of America’s technology uses and include questions on computer ownership and broadband vs. dial-up adoption in its ongoing American Community Survey, according to the Act.

Progress on the Broadband Data Improvement Act came amidst heavy criticism of both the federal government’s broadband data collection methods and metrics as well as the United States’ arguably poor stature in broadband connectivity levels when compared to other nations.

The importance of improving the country’s broadband infrastructure was the subject of a recent hearing before the Senate Commerce Committee, the same committee responsible for the markup of S. 1492. At the hearing, representatives from an array of consumer groups conveyed to senators the impact broadband has had on American’s lives through innovations like online education, telehealth applications, and increased employment opportunities. Broadband was even responsible for the delivery of one citizens testimony from Alaska, where citizens living on remote native American lands depend on high-speed internet for key access to virtual health care delivered from as far away as Dayton, Ohio.

Inouye concluded the hearing by stating that federal policies should better reflect the importance of broadband to the national communications system.

The following week, another set of experts gathered at the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington at the Broadband Census for America Conference to discuss the importance of improving broadband data collection in order to better inform policy.

At the conference, broadband policy makers and economic experts like Professor Kenneth Flamm of the University of Texas discussed the challenge to the development of sound policy posed by the lack of quality data. “We really don’t have a lot of scientific data available on broadband right now,” Flamm said.

Former FCC Commissioner Rachelle Chong, currently a Public Utility Commission in California, presented a keynote address at conference focusing on California’s current efforts to collect granular data on broadband availability in the state. The effort seeks to improve upon the limited and highly criticized data published by the FCC.

On Capitol Hill, S. 1492 does not dictate any major reforms in the FCC methodology, a signal that Congress is largely satisfied with recent self-improvements the Commission said it would make. In June, the FCC released the details of a March order seeking collection of data about broadband availability at the census tract level. The FCC refuses to release the names of the broadband providers that offer service, citing “competitive harm” that would follow from such disclosure.

The FCC also seeks to include of speed tier data to better reflect the quality of service advertised by broadband providers.

The Broadband Data Improvement Act does attempt to improve further on some of the FCC’s metrics through other institutions. On speed and price, for example, S. 1492 calls for GAO to develop methods and metrics to measure the actual price per bit consumers receive and the actual broadband speeds they experience as well, as opposed to the advertised speeds.

While specific funding for these provisions awaits determination by the Appropriations Committee, the act does direct Commerce to establish a grants program that will match funds by state, municipal, or non-profit organizations intended for “initiatives to identify and track the availability and adoption of broadband services within each State.”

The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) cited this final provision in particular on Wednesday when Ray Baum of the Oregon Public Utilities Commission, and chairman of the NARUC Telecommunications Committee, applauded Congress for acknowledging “the important role States play.” He added: “the information gained as a result of this bill will speed broadband-collection programs and help bring the power of the Internet to as many citizens as possible.”

Broadband Census Resources:

BroadbandCensus.com Wishes You a Happy One Web Week!

in Expert Opinion by

Blog Entries

WASHINGTON, September 22 – Today is September 22, 2008. Happy One Web Day and Happy One Web Week!

BroadbandCensus.com has been involved in the preparations for One Web Day since the beginning of summer. We believe that this day marks an opportunity for all internet users to pause, take stock, and ask themselves: what are my broadband internet options? BroadbandCensus.com, a free web service, can help you answer that question.

The message that BroadbandCensus.com brings to One Web Day is three-fold:

  1. 1. Take the Broadband Census! As part of One Web Day, we encourage everyone to go to http://broadbandcensus.com/census/form, and answer a seven-question survey. You will then have the opportunity to take our free speed test, which allows you to compare your promised with your actual internet speeds.
  1. 2. We are wishing you a One Web Week because of our Broadband Census for America Conference THIS FRIDAY, September 22, 8:30 a.m. at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. See http://broadbandcensus.com/conference.
  1. Sponsored by Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Texas at Austin, Virginia Tech and BroadbandCensus.com, the Broadband Census for America Conference will be the first major event about publicly-available data about broadband connections. Featured speakers at the event include:
  1. • Eamonn Confrey, First Secretary, Information and Communications Policy, Embassy of Ireland.
  2. • Rachelle Chong, Commissioner, California Public Utilities Commission
  3. • Professor Kenneth Flamm, University of Texas at Austin
  4. • Dr. William Lehr, Economist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  5. • James McConnaughey, Chief Economist, National Telecommunications Information Administration
  1. For the first time, officials from both Connected Nation and their critics at Public Knowledge will share the stage to discuss broadband mapping.
  1. 3. As part of the lead up to One Web Week, BroadbandCensus.com has begun publishing a series of state-by-state articles profiling the broadband deployment and data in each of the 50 United States. We’ve profiled about one-third of the country so far, and plan to keep going until we’ve done all of them.
  1. Click here for the complete (and growing) list of articles. The article-by-article list is below.

Finally, let me conclude a personal note: About eight months ago, I launched BroadbandCensus.com because I believe that the public needs better local broadband information.

We are making huge progress in helping policy-makers understand the central importance of broadband — and about how publicly-available data can help drive broadband availability, competition, faster speeds and lower prices. If there is one thing that everyone says they agree upon in this debate, it is the need for BETTER BROADBAND DATA. BroadbandCensus.com is all about making broadband data free and publicly available.

We hope you will get involved with BroadbandCensus.com. Here are three simple things you can do to help:

Broadband Census in the States:

Agenda for Broadband Census for America Conference on September 26, 2008

in Press Releases by

Key Academics, State Officials and Broadband Data Collectors to Speak

Embassy of Ireland to Give Luncheon Keynote Address on Publicly-Available Broadband Data

Coverage of the Broadband Census for America Conference

For Immediate Release

WASHINGTON, September 8, 2008 – Many of the nation’s foremost broadband policy-makers and experts will analyze and discuss best practices for improving the collection and sharing of public data about high-speed internet access at the Broadband Census for America Conference in Washington, D.C., on Friday, September 26, 2008.

Panelists at the half-day conference include Rachelle Chong, California Public Utility Commissioner; broadband data pioneer Professor Kenneth Flamm of the University of Texas at Austin; Dr. William Lehr, an economist and broadband expert at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Jane Smith Patterson, executive director of the e-NC Authority; Indiana Utility Regulatory Commissioner Larry Landis, who is also the state chair of a telecommunications regulatory task force charged with coordinating state efforts to collect broadband data and preparing reports on broadband to Congress; and National Telecommunications and Information Administration Chief Economist James McConnaughey.

Eamonn Confrey, the First Secretary for Information and Communications Policy at the Embassy of Ireland, will present the luncheon keynote: an overview of his nation’s efforts to collect data on broadband service in Ireland through a comprehensive web site with availability, pricing and speed data about carriers.

Also participating on the panels will be representatives from BroadbandCensus.com, the California Broadband Task Force, Connected Nation, Communications Workers of America’s Speed Matters, Public Knowledge, and Virginia Tech’s eCorridors Program.

As policy-makers around the world seek innovative approaches to enhancing and expanding broadband service, they also seek accurate data and maps of the digital infrastructure. Increasingly, experts believe that universal broadband is a crucial ingredient to global economic competitiveness.

These efforts are apparent here in the United States with the Federal Communications Commission’s proposed rules to collect more localized data on broadband service and the U.S. House of Representatives introducing the “Broadband Census of America Act,” which would require a comprehensive national inventory of broadband availability and competition.

The conference will be held at the American Association for the Advancement of Science at 12th and H Streets, NW, and is sponsored by BroadbandCensus.com, Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Texas at Austin’s Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law, and the Virginia Tech eCorridors Program.

The event will bring together government officials, academic researchers and other key stakeholders for a half-day conference that seeks to improve our understanding of current practices in broadband data collection and discuss ways of improving and expanding publicly-available data within the United States.

The conference program features the following speakers:

  • Eamonn Confrey, First Secretary, Information and Communications Policy, Embassy of Ireland. Mr. Confrey has confirmed as the luncheon speaker on “Mapping out Broadband for Consumers: The Irish Experience.”
  • Commissioner Rachelle Chong, current Commissioner of the California state Public Utilities Commission and former Commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission, will speak on “Section 706 Through the Years: A Perspective from a Serial Regulator.”

The conference will also feature two panel discussions. Panelists scheduled to speak on the first panel, titled “Does America Need a Broadband Census?”, include the following:

  • Art Brodsky, Communications Director, Public Knowledge
  • Drew Clark, Executive Director, BroadbandCensus.com
  • Professor Kenneth Flamm, University of Texas at Austin, coauthor, “Measuring Broadband: Improving Communications Policymaking through Better Data Collection,” (Pew Internet and American Life Project: 2007)
  • Debbie Goldman, Speed Matters Coordinator, Communications Workers of America
  • Larry Landis, Indiana Utility Regulatory Commissioner; also State Chair, National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners-FCC Joint Conference on Advanced Services
  • Mark McElroy, Chief Operating Officer, Connected Nation
  • This panel will be moderated by Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times

Panelists scheduled to speak on the second panel, “How Should America Conduct a Broadband Census?”, include the following:

  • Jeffrey Campbell, Director, Technology and Communications Policy, Cisco Systems
  • Dr. William Lehr, Economist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • James McConnaughey, Senior Economist, National Telecommunications Information Administration
  • Jane Smith Patterson, Executive Director, e-NC Authority
  • Jean Plymale, Virginia Tech eCorridors Program
  • This panel will be moderated by Carol Wilson, Telephony Online.

Click HERE for complete bios and background materials.

The Broadband Census for America Conference will be held at the American Association for the Advancement of Science at 1200 New York Avenue NW, Washington, DC. (The building is at the corner of 12th Street and H Street, NW.)

The conference will run from 8:30 a.m. and conclude by 1 p.m., providing ample time for those seeking to make the short commute from Washington to the Telecommunications Policy Research Conference in Arlington, Virginia.

For More Information: Drew Bennett, 202-580-8196, bennett@broadbandcensus.com

Pricing:

  • ACADEMIC (Includes faculty, staff, and students at universities and secondary institutions) – NO CHARGE
  • GOVERNMENT (Includes international, federal, state and local government officials) – NO CHARGE
  • INDUSTRY – $295
  • NON-PROFIT (including individuals) ** – $195;
  • PRESS – NO CHARGE

**Non-profit organizations that feel they could not attend otherwise may apply for a waiver of conference fee.

To place your reservation to attend, please e-mail: conference@broadbandcensus.com. Checks may be made payable to Broadband Census LLC, 1705 Warner Ave., McLean, VA 22101.

Industry Sponsor

CCMI is the industry’s trusted source for communications data, information and applications. Communications service providers and enterprise users rely on CCMI data and training to operate more efficiently, make better decisions and stay abreast of communications technologies and trends. With extensive industry contacts, rigorous quality standards and a veteran staff, CCMI guarantees you get reliable content, world-class service and unparalleled value. For more information, visit http://www.ccmi.com.

Nonprofit Sponsors

The Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) is the country’s premier voice in education technology leadership, serving K-12 technology leaders who through their strategic use of technology, improve teaching and learning. CoSN’s membership includes key education technology leaders (often called Chief Technology Officers—CTOs) in leading-edge school districts, as well as policy makers, private sector leaders. For more information, visit http://www.cosn.org or call 1-866-267-8747.

OneWebDay is an Earth Day for the internet. The idea behind OneWebDay is to focus attention on a key internet value (this year, online participation in democracy), focus attention on local internet concerns (connectivity, censorship, individual skills), and create a global constituency that cares about protecting and defending the internet. For more information, visit http://www.onewebday.org.

Research Sponsor

Emerging Media Dynamics is a strategic advisory services practice aimed at helping cable, telco, wireless, satellite, technology and content companies gain an edge in the emerging world of IP media. It provides data-rich, well-informed and up-to-the-minute customized reports, analyses and presentations that decipher, interpret and explain the rush of corporate, technological and policy changes driving the development of cutting-edge communications applications. For more information, visit http://www.emediadynamics.com.

Media Sponsor

The leading publisher in the field of communications law since 1948, Pike & Fischer provides the expert legal analysis that attorneys, engineers, and managers require. Pike & Fischer’s market analysts report the most significant business news and trends affecting the rapidly evolving telecommunications and broadband sectors. Our news, historical data, and on-call research provide the raw materials necessary for sound decision-making. For more information, visit http://pf.com.

Broadband Census for America Conference Details

Location:
American Association for the Advancement of Science
1200 New York Avenue NW, Washington, DC
(The building is at the corner of 12th Street and H Street, NW.)

Time:
Friday, September 26, 2008
8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

The Conference Agenda [subject to minor changes]:
8:30 a.m. Welcome to the Broadband Census for America

  • Drew Clark, BroadbandCensus.com
  • Jon Peha, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Brenda van Gelder, Virginia Tech
  • Kenneth Flamm, University of Texas at Austin

8:40 a.m. Keynote Speech: “Section 706 Through the Years: A Perspective from a Serial Regulator,”

  • Commissioner Rachelle Chong, California State Public Utilities Commission

9:10 a.m. Questions for and Answers from Commissioner Chong

9:20 a.m. Panel I: Does America Need a Broadband Census?

  • Art Brodsky, Communications Director, Public Knowledge
  • Drew Clark, Executive Director, BroadbandCensus.com
  • Kenneth Flamm, University of Texas at Austin, coauthor, “Measuring Broadband: Improving Communications Policymaking through Better Data Collection,” (Pew Internet and American Life Project: 2007).
  • Debbie Goldman, Speed Matters Coordinator, Communications Workers of America
  • Larry Landis, Indiana Utility Regulatory Commissioner; also State Chair, NARUC-FCC Joint Conference on Advanced Services
  • Mark McElroy, Chief Operating Officer, Connected Nation
  • Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times (Moderator)

10:30 a.m. Break

10:45 a.m. Panel II: HOW Should America Conduct a Broadband Census?

  • Jeffrey Campbell, Director, Technology and Communications Policy, Cisco Systems
  • Dr. William Lehrer, Economist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • James McConnaughey, Chief Economist, National Telecommunications Information Administration
  • Jane Smith Patterson, Executive Director, e-NC Authority
  • Jean Plymale, Virginia Tech eCorridors Program
  • Carol Wilson, Telephony Online (Moderator)

Noon Luncheon Keynote: “Mapping out Broadband for Consumers: The Irish Experience”

  • Eamonn Confrey, First Secretary, Information and Communications Policy, Embassy of Ireland

12:30 p.m. Questions for and Answers from Mr. Confrey

1 p.m. Adjourn

Program Committee:

  • Drew Bennett, Special Assistant, BroadbandCensus.com
  • Drew Clark, Executive Director, BroadbandCensus.com
  • Professor Kenneth Flamm, Director, Technology, Innovation and Global Security Program, Robert S. Strauss Center, University of Texas at Austin
  • Brenda van Gelder, Director, Virginia Tech eCorridors Program
  • John Horrigan, Associate Director for Research, Pew Internet Project; and Chair, 2008 Telecommunications Policy Research Conference
  • Sascha Meinrath, Research Director, New America Foundation; and President, Ethos Wireless
  • Professor Jon Peha, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Jean Plymale, Virginia Tech eCorridors Program
  • Scott Wallsten, Vice President for Research, Technology Policy Institute

Press Release Referenced:

About the Sponsors

Broadband Census.com:

BroadbandCensus.com is a free web service providing information and news about local broadband speeds, availability, competition and quality of service. Organized by technology journalist Drew Clark as Broadband Census LLC (a Limited Liability Company in the Commonwealth of Virginia), BroadbandCensus.com is independent of all internet providers, receives no funding from carriers, and takes no position on telecommunications policy issues. For more information, visit http://broadbandcensus.com/home/aboutus.

Carnegie Mellon University:

Carnegie Mellon University’s Engineering and Public Policy Department is a unique program within the Engineering College that addresses important problems in technology and policy in which the technical details are of central importance. Areas of focus include information and communication technology policy, energy and environmental systems, risk analysis and communication, and technological innovation and R&D policy. For more information, visit http://www.epp.cmu.edu.

Robert S. Strauss Center:

The Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law at The University of Texas at Austin aims to provide the imagination, leadership and intellectual innovation required to meet the challenges of the 21st century, engaging the best minds in academia, government and the private sector in developing practical solutions to the pressing problems of an increasingly globalized world. The Strauss Center’s Technology, Innovation and Global Security Program supports policy-oriented research and outreach programs on how to sustain innovation and better utilize modern technology to benefit an increasingly international economic and social system. For more information, visit http://www.RobertStraussCenter.org.

Virginia Tech eCorridors Program:

eCorridors is an outreach program of Virginia Tech that was established in 2000. Its activities include telecommunications policy, communications infrastructure, research and other computing applications as well as community networks and economic development in a networked world. eCorridors is a primary means through which government, private sector industry and community stakeholders participate and collaborate with Virginia Tech researchers and IT professionals. For more information, visit http://www.ecorridors.vt.edu.

Announcing a Half-Day Conference About Universal Broadband Data on September 26, 2008

in Press Releases by

‘Broadband Census for America’ Conference to Focus on Sharing Publicly-Available Broadband Data

Save the Date Announcement

Editor’s Note: The agenda for the Broadband Census for America Conference was released on September 8, 2008, and is available at http://broadbandcensus.com/blog/?p=569. Please visit the page for fuller details about the conference program.

WASHINGTON, August 7, 2008 – BroadbandCensus.com, Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Texas at Austin’s Robert S. Strauss Center, and the Virginia Tech eCorridors Program invite government officials, academic researchers and other key stakeholders to a half-day conference on collecting and sharing public data about high-speed internet access.

The conference, “Broadband Census for America,” aims to assemble state, local and federal officials engaged in gathering and mapping information about broadband availability, competition, speeds, prices and quality of service. Academic researchers will lend their perspective on the importance of universal broadband data.

Keynote speakers scheduled to address the conference include:

  • Eamonn Confrey, First Secretary, Information and Communications Policy, Embassy of Ireland. Mr. Confrey has confirmed as the luncheon speaker on “Mapping out Broadband for Consumers: The Irish Experience.”
  • Massachusetts Representative Ed Markey*, Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet. (*Invited to present opening keynote.)

The conference will also feature two panel discussions assembling key officials from academia, the states, the federal government and private-sector initiatives to publish broadband information.

The panel titles are: “Why Does America Need a Broadband Census?” and “How Should America Conduct a Broadband Census?” More details will be forthcoming.

Broadband Census for America” is being held at the American Association for the Advancement of Science at 1200 New York Avenue NW, Washington, DC. (The building is at the corner of 12th Street and H Street, NW.)

The conference will run from 8:30 a.m. and conclude by 1 p.m., providing ample time for those seeking to make the short commute from Washington to the Telecommunications Policy Research Conference in Arlington, Virginia.

To place your reservation to attend, please e-mail: conference@broadbandcensus.com

‘Broadband Census for America’ Conference Details

Location:
American Association for the Advancement of Science
1200 New York Avenue NW, Washington, DC
(The building is at the corner of 12th Street and H Street, NW.)

Time:
Friday, September 26, 2008
8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Program Committee:

  • Drew Bennett, Special Assistant, BroadbandCensus.com
  • Drew Clark, Executive Director, BroadbandCensus.com
  • Professor Kenneth Flamm, Director, Techology, Innovation and Global Security Program, Robert S. Strauss Center
  • Brenda van Gelder, Director, Virginia Tech eCorridors Program
  • John Horrigan, Associate Director for Research, Pew Internet Project; and Chair, 2008 Telecommunications Policy Research Conference
  • Sascha Meinrath, Research Director, New America Foundation; and President, Ethos Wireless
  • Professor Jon Peha, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Jean Plymale, Senior Systems Engineer, Virginia Tech eCorridors Program
  • Scott Wallsten, Vice President for Research, Technology Policy Institute

Pricing:

  • ACADEMIC (Includes faculty, staff, and students at universities and secondary institutions) – NO CHARGE
  • GOVERNMENT (Includes international, federal, state and local government officials) – NO CHARGE
  • INDUSTRY – $295
  • NON-PROFIT^ – $195
  • PRESS – NO CHARGE

^Non-profit organizations that feel they could not attend otherwise may apply for a waiver of conference fee.

Press Release Referenced:

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