Posts Tagged ‘Demand Progress’

Broadband Roundup: Advocacy Groups Weigh in Pro-and-Con on Net Neutrality

FCC, Net Neutrality September 17th, 2014

WASHINGTON, September 17, 2014 – A variety of developments on the battle regarding network neutrality: FreePress Tells FCC Title II Ensures Net Neutrality Protections The advocacy group Free Press blasted Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler’s efforts to use Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 as the means to enough to ensure network […]

How Internet Companies Are Driving a Public Utility Regulation Approach to Net Neutrality

FCC, Net Neutrality September 12th, 2014

WASHINGTON, September 12, 2014 – In what would have seemed highly unlikely just a few months ago, growing support for public utility regulation is emerging. Tech companies, politicians, internet service providers, and component makers have started to outline their views regarding their policy approach to the issue of net neutrality. In order to understand the […]

Broadband Roundup: Senate Announces Hearings on Open Internet, While House Democratcs Urge FCC to Regulate Broadband, and Popular Web Sites Protest ‘Slow Lanes’

Net Neutrality September 10th, 2014

WASHINGTON, September 10, 2014 – The Senate Judiciary Committee announced that it had scheduled a hearing next Wednesday on the best means to protect an open internet. Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., said he saw the hearing as an opportunity to hear testimony about his views regarding importance of a free and open internet. Leahy and Rep. […]

‘On the Internet, No One Knows You’re a Child’: The Short Life of Aaron Swartz, at Sundance

Broadband's Impact, Copyright, Net Neutrality, People, The Innovation Economy, Transparency January 23rd, 2014

PARK CITY, Utah, January 23, 2014 – On the internet, no one knows you’re a child.

That, at least, was the message I took from watching the film about the life of Aaron Swartz. The film, “The Internet’s Own Boy,” premiered this week here at the Sundance Film Festival, during which it received a sustained standing ovation.

The documentary is a biography of, and tribute to, the all-too-short life of Swartz, who died a year ago this month, at age 26.

Swartz had been under intense pressure from the federal prosecutors in Massachusetts. Criminal charges filed against him, if proven, could have imprisoned him for 35 years. Those charges stemmed from Swartz’s having downloaded millions of articles from JSTOR, a digital library of academic journals, onto a computer at the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. While it is unclear what Swartz intended to do with the articles, it seems implausible that he would have republished them in an act of copyright infringement.


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