Posts Tagged ‘Jeff Eisenach’

Expert Opinion: Broadband Adventures in Wunderland: The Myth of the $7 million home

Broadband Mapping, Broadband Stimulus, Broadband's Impact, Education, Expert Opinion, Health July 21st, 2011

If it were a piece of classical music, the “study” by Navigant Economics’ Jeffrey Eisenach and Kevin Caves could easily be titled “Variations on a False Narrative in the key of F.” They claim, after a review of three (count ‘em, 3) of the hundreds of broadband grants, the broadband stimulus cost too much for too little ROI.

The most misleading of the claims, though, is the alleged $349,234 spent per un-served household. Well, I should say the $7 million per un-served household, but I’ll come back to that in a bit.

ITIF Panel Debates Government Intervention in Broadband Networks

Broadband's Impact June 2nd, 2011

WASHINGTON, June 2, 2011 – The Information Technology & Innovation Foundation assembled a panel Wednesday to debate the merits and minuses of government support of broadband networks.

The Oxford-style debate, “Governments Should Neither Subsidize nor Operate Broadband Networks to Compete with Commercial Ones,” included four panelists. Rob Atkinson, President of ITIF and Jeff Eisenach, Managing Director and Principal of Navigant Economics argued against government intervention; Jim Baller, President of Baller Herbst Law Group, and Chris Mitchell, Director of Telecommunications at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance argued in favor.

Sallet: Broadband Changes Traditional Value Chain

Broadband's Impact, The Innovation Economy May 11th, 2011

WASHINGTON May 11, 2011 – Former Director of the Office of Policy & Strategic Planning of the Department of Commerce under President Clinton, Jonathan Sallet, presented a new way to look at the traditional value chain with respect to broadband Tuesday at a congressional briefing presented by the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation.

Sallet presented the value chain not as a chain at all, but rather as a circle.

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