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Patrick Leahy

One Day After FCC’s Net Neutrality Repeal, Focus Turns to Reactions and Responses

WASHINGTON, December 15, 2017 – The Federal Communications Commission’s Thursday vote to repeal the “open internet” rules classifying broadband services as common carriers represents the most significant regulatory shift in the internet in more than a decade. Critics in Congress, at the agency, and even on late-night TV wasted no time in blasting it. These… Keep Reading

Broadband Roundup: California Public Utilities Commission Delays Title II Regulation

WASHINGTON, September 15, 2014 – Set to pass a proposal enduring public utility regulation of broadband providers under Title II of the Communications Act, the California Public Utilities Commission instead put the proposal on hold, reported Multichannel News. The proposal endorsing Title II regulation was believed to have passed on a 3-2 vote on September… Keep Reading

Net Neutrality

Broadband Roundup: Senate Announces Hearings on Open Internet, While House Democratcs Urge FCC to Regulate Broadband, and Popular Web Sites Protest ‘Slow Lanes’

WASHINGTON, September 10, 2014 – The Senate Judiciary Committee announced that it had scheduled a hearing next Wednesday on the best means to protect an open internet. Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., said he saw the hearing as an opportunity to hear testimony about his views regarding importance of a free and open internet. Leahy and Rep.… Keep Reading

Broadband Roundup: Rural Providers Want RUS Funding, AT&T Expands ‘GigaPower’, and Potential Surveillance Changes

WASHINGTON, July 30, 2014 – The House Agriculture Subcommittee on Livestock, Rural Development and Credit held a hearing on coordinating the future of broadband investment. Lang Zimmerman, vice president of Yelcot Telephone Co., a member company of rural broadband association NTCA testified that funding the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Utilities Service is critical for… Keep Reading

Broadband Roundup: Supreme Court Upholds Privacy and Copyright, Plus FCC’s Wheeler Talks Net Neutrality in Silicon Valley

WASHINGTON, June 26, 2014 – The Supreme Court ruled unanimously Wednesday that a search warrant is necessary for police to search the digital content of an arrested individual’s cell phone. Chief Justice John Roberts, writing for the court, held that the contents of mobile phones are protected under the Fourth Amendment: “modern cell phones are… Keep Reading

FCC/Net Neutrality

Nipping at Heels of FCC’s Net Neutrality Proceeding, Legislators Introduce Bill Barring ‘Paid Prioritization’

WASHINGTON, June 17, 2014 – Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., and Rep. Doris Matsui, D-Calif., on Tuesday introduced a bill, the Online Competition and Consumer Choice Act, that would grant the Federal Communications Commission the authority to bar so-called “paid prioritization” agreements between internet service providers and content providers over the last-mile of a broadband connection.… Keep Reading

FBI Director Testifies On Cybersecurity, Says Agency Can Balance National Security and Civil Liberties

WASHINGTON, May 22, 2014 – At the Senate Judiciary Committee’s oversight hearing on the FBI on Wednesday, FBI Director James Comey faced scrutiny over the agency’s ability to balance national security and civil liberties in light of technological advancements. Among issues discussed were cyber threats and surveillance programs that acquire data on a massive scale.… Keep Reading

Broadband Roundup: FBI after Chinese Hackers, AT&T after DirecTV, Congress after FCC Chairman Wheeler

WASHINGTON, May 20, 2014 – On Monday, tensions with China over cybersecurity increased as the U.S. Justice Department indicted five Chinese military officers for stealing trade secrets from six United States companies. The Guardian quoted Attorney General Eric Holder as saying, “The range of trade secrets and other sensitive business information stolen in this case… Keep Reading

Copyright/Intellectual Property

Internet’s Founding Architects: Latest U.S. Senate Effort To Block Online Pirates Will Instigate Internet Chaos

SAN FRANCISCO, November 18th, 2010 -- The U.S. Senate's latest battle plan against intellectual property piracy online could gain traction and be approved by the body's Judiciary Committee Thursday, but a large group of the internet's founding architects are warning that the plan's technical approach would wreak havoc and destabilize the global network. Keep Reading

Intellectual Property Breakfast Club Today Likely to Focus on Bill Seizing Infringing Web Domains

WASHINGTON, October 12, 2010 - The Intellectual Property Breakfast Club on Tuesday, focusing on "Finding Solutions to the Problems of Copyright Infringement," may well focus on S. 3804, the “Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act” (COICA), introduced late last month by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy and Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah. Keep Reading

Copyright

Will the US and China Share A Similar Model When Attacking IP Pirates Online?

San Francisco, September 29, 2010 -- A legislative proposal to allow the US' top cop to seize the web addresses of sites that authorities deem are dedicated to pirating intellectual property bears a remarkable resemblance to a crackdown currently underway in China against online pirates. A bipartisan group of 10 U.S. senators last week introduced legislation that would enable the U.S. Justice Department to render inaccessible Web sites judged to be dedicated to intellectual property infringement. Keep Reading

Copyright

Justice Dept Could Shutter Infringing Web Sites With Court Orders Against Domain Name Registrars

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 21, 2010 -- A bipartisan group of 10 US senators on Monday introduced legislation that would enable the US Justice Department to render inaccessible Web sites judged to be dedicated to intellectual property infringement. The legislation would enable Justice to seek a preliminary injunction against domain name registrars, which would have to suspend access to the domains hosting infringing material, or that are trafficking in infringing material. The legislation would require the US attorney general to notify the federal intellectual property enforcement co-coordinator of the injunctions, and the coordinator would in turn be required to post the names of the suspended sites on a public web site. Keep Reading

Senate Judiciary Committee Approves Data Security Bills

The Senate Judiciary Committee approved two data security bills Thursday. The first measure, S.1490, seeks to prevent and mitigate identity theft, ensure privacy, and provide notice of security breaches. It also would enhance criminal penalties, law enforcement assistance, and other protections against data security breaches. The legislation was filed by Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt. Keep Reading

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