Posts Tagged ‘Pillsbury’

Will This Signal Be Televised? ‘Retransmission Consent’ Unscrambled At Breakfast Panel Of Broadcasters, Cable Industry and Public Interest Reps

Broadband TV, FCC, Media ownership, National Broadband Plan June 11th, 2010

WASHINGTON, June 11, 2010 – If you missed’s panel session on retransmission consent fees, here’s your chance to catch up and re-examine the issues in a complex debate that’s been controversial since the enactment of the regime in the 1992 Cable Act.

Experts Debate Retransmission Consent Rules

Broadband Updates, Broadband's Impact, FCC June 8th, 2010

WASHINGTON, June 8, 2010 – Retransmission consent rules were established decades ago and many communications experts are arguing that it’s time to reevaluate them. At a Intellectual Property Breakfast Club, members of the broadband environment voiced their opinions and concerns about retransmission consent fees

Tuesday’s Free Intellectual Property Breakfast Club on Retrans Consent a ‘Must Attend’ Event

Broadband Calendar, Broadband TV, Broadband's Impact, Copyright, FCC, Intellectual Property June 4th, 2010

WASHINGTON, June 4, 2010 – on Friday announced the addition of two new panelists – Toni Cook Bush of Skadden Arps and Matt Polka of the American Cable Association – to its FREE June 8th Intellectual Property Breakfast Club event.

The panel, to be held at Clyde’s of Gallery Place at 707 7th Street NW, in Washington, is certain to be the “must attend” event on this increasingly hot topic of “New Retransmission Consent Battles and Licensing Video Content.” Register now!

‘The Great Spectrum Debate’ Pits Licensed Versus Opportunistic Uses of Airwaves

Broadband TV, National Broadband Plan, Wireless April 23rd, 2010

WASHINGTON, April 23, 2010 – on Friday released, for FREE, the full-length video of the Broadband Breakfast Club event on April 20, 2010: “The Great Spectrum Debate.”

The event included key industry officials addressing Chapter 5 of the national broadband plan, dealing with spectrum. The event was moderated by Amy Schatz, Telecommunications Reporter, The Wall Street Journal.

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