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United Kingdom

Broadband's Impact

When It Comes to Telecommuting, Companies Save, But the U.S. Lags

WASHINGTON, June 28, 2011- The Telework Research Network released its report on the state of telecommuting Monday, showing that individuals who work from home are more productive than those who report to an office everyday, but that the United States has a lower percentage of workers who telecommute than its international counterparts. In the United States, many consider telecommuting a perk rather than a standard business practice, as it is in most of the rest of the world. In Canada nearly four percent of the population teleworks or workshifts regularly. In the United Kingdom, it is even higher at a little over five percent of the population. Keep Reading

Is ‘Three Strikes’ the Right Tool? Top French, British and Americans Discuss at Nov. 9 Breakfast

WASHINGTON, November 4, 2010 – The internet and intellectual property policy news and events service BroadbandBreakfast.com invites the public to its FREE November event in its Intellectual Property Breakfast Club series, “Approaches by Internet Service Providers Around the World to Copyright Infringement.” Our November 2010 panel continues the discussion about file-sharing and other forms of copyright infringement, but broadens it to the global stage, with a particular focus on the approaches of broadband providers outside the United States. What tactics have been deployed by ISPs in France and elsewhere? Will America follow suit? Keep Reading

U.K. Regulator Ofcom Moves to Allay Broadband Dissatisfaction

LONDON, August 10, 2010 – U.K. regulator Ofcom has stepped up its efforts to close the gap between headline speeds advertised by the country’s internet service providers and real performance delivered. A new survey from ISPreview, an independent online source of broadband service information, revealed that dissatisfaction among U.K. subscribers is rising despite improvements in performance. Keep Reading

United States Ranked 23rd in Broadband Development

WASHINGTON, July 26, 2010 – According to a study released last week by Strategy Analytics, the United States ranks 23rd in its development of broadband infrastructure. It places one spot beneath the United Kingdom, which recently pushed back its goal of universal access to 2015 citing funding concerns, with smaller countries such as Lithuania and Singapore ranking several spots above it. Keep Reading

UK to Push Universal Service Goal Back 3 Years

WASHINGTON July 15, 2010 - With a tightening budget the United Kingdom government has decided to push back their universal service deadline by 3 years. Last year the nation had committed to bringing 2 Megabits per second to all citizens by 2012 but will now push the deadline to 2015. Tory Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt claimed that the plan which was developed by the Labour party was impractical giving budget constraints. Keep Reading

BBC Paints a Pretty Canvas, but Will People Buy It?

LONDON, July 9, 2010 - Project Canvas, a bold attempt to make the Internet a major medium for TV distribution, is gathering steam in the United Kingdom, led by terrestrial broadcasters BBC and ITV, along with major telecommunication companies including the largest national carrier BT. The service, which will be launched under a new brand, possibly “YouView,” in early 2011, will allow U.K. consumers to watch broadcast programs including BBC channels as well as its iPlayer catch-up service, from their televisions via the Internet. Keep Reading

Broadband May Meet Its Match During World Cup

LONDON, June 7, 2010 - Several factors are conspiring to make the 2010 football World Cup a testing time for Europe’s fixed and mobile broadband networks. The soccer tournament kicks off June 11 in South Africa. Europe has six of the world’s top eight footballing nations competing, and fanatical populations are desperate to keep up from office computers, mobile devices, home televisions or at a public venue for large-screen viewing. Keep Reading

Smart Grid

United Kingdom Defines Carbon Neutrality for the First Time

WASHINGTON, November 15, 2009 - The government of the United Kingdom defined the term “carbon neutral” this month after holding a public consultation on the subject. The Department of Energy and Climate Change, which was established in 2008, said that “carbon neutral means that – through a transparent process of calculating emissions, reducing those emissions and offsetting residual emissions – net carbon emissions equal zero.” Keep Reading

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