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Broadband's Impact

Study: Broadband Gives Rural Regions Economic Boost

WASHINGTON, August 31, 2009 – The role of rural communities continues to play a major part in the debate over the state of the nation’s broad¬band with a new study finding that high-speed Internet access helps grow their economic base.

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Drew Clark is the Editor and Publisher of BroadbandBreakfast.com and a nationally-respected telecommunications attorney at The CommLaw Group. He has closely tracked the trends in and mechanics of digital infrastructure for 20 years, and has helped fiber-based and fixed wireless providers navigate coverage, identify markets, broker infrastructure, and operate in the public right of way. The articles and posts on Broadband Breakfast and affiliated social media, including the BroadbandCensus Twitter feed, are not legal advice or legal services, do not constitute the creation of an attorney-client privilege, and represent the views of their respective authors.

Broadband's Impact

Fiber Broadband Association Kicks Off Fiber Connect 2021

The FBA doled out numerous awards during its first general session of the event.

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FBA's Gary Bolton speaking on stage during Fiber Connect 2021

From BroadbandCensus.com Weekly Report

WASHINGTON, August 31, 2009 – The role of rural communities continues to play a major part in the debate over the state of the nation’s broad¬band with a new study finding that high-speed Internet access helps grow their economic base.

“Broadband Internet’s Value for Rural America,” a report http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/err78 put together by economists at the Agriculture Department’s Economic Research Service, compared counties that had broadband access by 2000 with similar regions that had little or no high-speed access. The authors found that rural communities with greater broadband Internet access had greater economic growth than areas with less access.

Employment growth was higher and non-farm private earnings were greater in counties that had broadband access for a longer period of time.

The study found that by 2007 most households (82 percent) with in-home Internet access had a broadband connection. There was a distinct difference between urban and rural broadband use. Seventy percent of rural households with Internet access at home had a connection compared to 84 percent of urban households at the time.

Broadband helped elevate the rural areas by providing online course and continuing education offerings as well as telemedicine and telehealth. The report also found that broadband allows rural areas to compete for low-and high-end service jobs, from call centers to software development. Additionally, the authors found that the farm sector is increasingly comprised of farm businesses that buy inputs and make sales online.

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Expert Opinion

Craig Settles: Libraries, Barbershops and Salons Tackle TeleHealthcare Gap

Craig Settles describes the important role that community institutions have played in promoting connectivity during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Photo of Urban Kutz Barbershops owner Waverly Willis getting his blood pressure checked used with permission

From BroadbandCensus.com Weekly Report

WASHINGTON, August 31, 2009 – The role of rural communities continues to play a major part in the debate over the state of the nation’s broad¬band with a new study finding that high-speed Internet access helps grow their economic base.

“Broadband Internet’s Value for Rural America,” a report http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/err78 put together by economists at the Agriculture Department’s Economic Research Service, compared counties that had broadband access by 2000 with similar regions that had little or no high-speed access. The authors found that rural communities with greater broadband Internet access had greater economic growth than areas with less access.

Employment growth was higher and non-farm private earnings were greater in counties that had broadband access for a longer period of time.

The study found that by 2007 most households (82 percent) with in-home Internet access had a broadband connection. There was a distinct difference between urban and rural broadband use. Seventy percent of rural households with Internet access at home had a connection compared to 84 percent of urban households at the time.

Broadband helped elevate the rural areas by providing online course and continuing education offerings as well as telemedicine and telehealth. The report also found that broadband allows rural areas to compete for low-and high-end service jobs, from call centers to software development. Additionally, the authors found that the farm sector is increasingly comprised of farm businesses that buy inputs and make sales online.

If you are not a subscriber, you may sign up for a 4 week free trial.

Continue Reading

Education

Broadband Breakfast CEO Drew Clark and BroadbandNow’s John Busby Speak on Libraries and Broadband

Friday’s Gigabit Libraries Network conversation will feature Drew Clark of Broadband Breakfast and John Busby of BroadbandNow.

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From BroadbandCensus.com Weekly Report

WASHINGTON, August 31, 2009 – The role of rural communities continues to play a major part in the debate over the state of the nation’s broad¬band with a new study finding that high-speed Internet access helps grow their economic base.

“Broadband Internet’s Value for Rural America,” a report http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/err78 put together by economists at the Agriculture Department’s Economic Research Service, compared counties that had broadband access by 2000 with similar regions that had little or no high-speed access. The authors found that rural communities with greater broadband Internet access had greater economic growth than areas with less access.

Employment growth was higher and non-farm private earnings were greater in counties that had broadband access for a longer period of time.

The study found that by 2007 most households (82 percent) with in-home Internet access had a broadband connection. There was a distinct difference between urban and rural broadband use. Seventy percent of rural households with Internet access at home had a connection compared to 84 percent of urban households at the time.

Broadband helped elevate the rural areas by providing online course and continuing education offerings as well as telemedicine and telehealth. The report also found that broadband allows rural areas to compete for low-and high-end service jobs, from call centers to software development. Additionally, the authors found that the farm sector is increasingly comprised of farm businesses that buy inputs and make sales online.

If you are not a subscriber, you may sign up for a 4 week free trial.

Continue Reading

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