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The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday heard oral arguments in the matter of the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to maintain a rate cap on telecommunications intercarrier payments for internet-bound dial-up traffic and a related ruling that helps keep wireless intercarrier payments low.

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The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday heard oral arguments in the matter of the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to maintain a rate cap on telecommunications intercarrier payments for internet-bound dial-up traffic and a related ruling that helps keep wireless intercarrier payments low.

At issue was a 2001 cap that the FCC placed on intercarrier payments. The cap saved wireless carriers substantially on termination fees. In November 2008, the FCC extended the application of that ruling to all forms of internet-bound traffic. Additionally, the FCC placed the entire matter under federal jurisdiction.

In appealing the decision, the states and the companies criticizing it said that once the FCC had used one set of arguments to justify their reasoning, it must be up to state regulators, and not the FCC, to “set the final rates in arbitration proceedings.” According to a Stifel Nicolaus telcom analysis, the three judges appear to be leaning toward the FCC’s side of the case.

Broadband Breakfast is a decade-old news organization based in Washington that is building a community of interest around broadband policy and internet technology, with a particular focus on better broadband infrastructure, the politics of privacy and the regulation of social media. Learn more about Broadband Breakfast.

Broadband Data

U.S. Broadband Deployment and Speeds are Beating Europe’s, Says Scholar Touting ‘Facilities-based Competition’

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The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday heard oral arguments in the matter of the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to maintain a rate cap on telecommunications intercarrier payments for internet-bound dial-up traffic and a related ruling that helps keep wireless intercarrier payments low.

At issue was a 2001 cap that the FCC placed on intercarrier payments. The cap saved wireless carriers substantially on termination fees. In November 2008, the FCC extended the application of that ruling to all forms of internet-bound traffic. Additionally, the FCC placed the entire matter under federal jurisdiction.

In appealing the decision, the states and the companies criticizing it said that once the FCC had used one set of arguments to justify their reasoning, it must be up to state regulators, and not the FCC, to “set the final rates in arbitration proceedings.” According to a Stifel Nicolaus telcom analysis, the three judges appear to be leaning toward the FCC’s side of the case.

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Broadband Updates

Discussion of Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event on High-Capacity Applications and Gigabit Connectivity

WASHINGTON, September 24, 2013 – The Broadband Breakfast Club released the first video of its Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event, on “How High-Capacity Applications Are Driving Gigabit Connectivity.”

The dialogue featured Dr. Glenn Ricart, Chief Technology Officer, US IGNITESheldon Grizzle of GigTank in Chattanooga, Tennessee; Todd MarriottExecutive Director of UTOPIA, the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency, and Drew ClarkChairman and Publisher, BroadbandBreakfast.com.

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The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday heard oral arguments in the matter of the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to maintain a rate cap on telecommunications intercarrier payments for internet-bound dial-up traffic and a related ruling that helps keep wireless intercarrier payments low.

At issue was a 2001 cap that the FCC placed on intercarrier payments. The cap saved wireless carriers substantially on termination fees. In November 2008, the FCC extended the application of that ruling to all forms of internet-bound traffic. Additionally, the FCC placed the entire matter under federal jurisdiction.

In appealing the decision, the states and the companies criticizing it said that once the FCC had used one set of arguments to justify their reasoning, it must be up to state regulators, and not the FCC, to “set the final rates in arbitration proceedings.” According to a Stifel Nicolaus telcom analysis, the three judges appear to be leaning toward the FCC’s side of the case.

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#broadbandlive

Breakfast Club Video: ‘Gigabit and Ultra-High-Speed Networks: Where They Stand Now and How They Are Building the Future’

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on

The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday heard oral arguments in the matter of the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to maintain a rate cap on telecommunications intercarrier payments for internet-bound dial-up traffic and a related ruling that helps keep wireless intercarrier payments low.

At issue was a 2001 cap that the FCC placed on intercarrier payments. The cap saved wireless carriers substantially on termination fees. In November 2008, the FCC extended the application of that ruling to all forms of internet-bound traffic. Additionally, the FCC placed the entire matter under federal jurisdiction.

In appealing the decision, the states and the companies criticizing it said that once the FCC had used one set of arguments to justify their reasoning, it must be up to state regulators, and not the FCC, to “set the final rates in arbitration proceedings.” According to a Stifel Nicolaus telcom analysis, the three judges appear to be leaning toward the FCC’s side of the case.

Continue Reading

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