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Broadband's Impact

Fiber at the Federal Communications Commission: Broadband Speeds Are Key

WASHINGTON, November 19, 2009 – Broadband speeds are important because technologies such as multi-way high definition video communication require next generation services to run, Benoit Felten of the Yankee Group said during a Federal Communications Commission meeting Thursday.

Felten said he expects in the next few years there will be many more offerings of 100 megabytes or higher broadband service that homes can subscribe to for reasonable prices, but currently this speed can only be found mainly in parts of the European Union or Asia. Felten, who was one of many experts the FCC had outline the specifics of broadband technology, focused his talk on fiber deployments around the world.

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WASHINGTON, November 19, 2009 – Broadband speeds are important because technologies such as multi-way high definition video communication require next generation services to run, Benoit Felten of the Yankee Group said during a Federal Communications Commission meeting Thursday.

Felten said he expects in the next few years there will be many more offerings of 100 megabytes or higher broadband service that homes can subscribe to for reasonable prices, but currently this speed can only be found mainly in parts of the European Union or Asia. Felten, who was one of many experts the FCC had outline the specifics of broadband technology, focused his talk on fiber deployments around the world.

Other speakers discussed fiber distribution topology, fiber distribution technology, and hybrid fiber solutions where fiber to the neighborhood is delivered to the end-user by non-fiber methods. Speakers outlined their current experience with certain fiber networks and anticipated improvements on the technology front.

David Isenberg, senior advisor for the FCC’s National Broadband Plan, provided the introductory remarks. Presenters included Dick Lynch of Verizon, Tim Nulty of ECFiber, Herman Wagter of Citynet Amsterdam, David Reed with CableLabs, Johan Henæs of INS Communications, among others.

Winter covered technology policy issues for five-and-a-half years as a reporter for the National Journal Group. She has worked for USA Today, the Washington Times, the Magazine Group, the State Department’s International Visitor’s Program, and the Council on Hemispheric Affairs. She also taught English at a university in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

Education

Surveying Broadband Issues Faced by Students Under COVID-19, CoSN Offers Its Recommendations

The speed of the broadband service used was only one component of the issues students faced.

Benjamin Kahn

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Photo of Keith Krueger, CEO of the Consortium of School Networking, from Millennium Sustainable Education

WASHINGTON, November 19, 2009 – Broadband speeds are important because technologies such as multi-way high definition video communication require next generation services to run, Benoit Felten of the Yankee Group said during a Federal Communications Commission meeting Thursday.

Felten said he expects in the next few years there will be many more offerings of 100 megabytes or higher broadband service that homes can subscribe to for reasonable prices, but currently this speed can only be found mainly in parts of the European Union or Asia. Felten, who was one of many experts the FCC had outline the specifics of broadband technology, focused his talk on fiber deployments around the world.

Other speakers discussed fiber distribution topology, fiber distribution technology, and hybrid fiber solutions where fiber to the neighborhood is delivered to the end-user by non-fiber methods. Speakers outlined their current experience with certain fiber networks and anticipated improvements on the technology front.

David Isenberg, senior advisor for the FCC’s National Broadband Plan, provided the introductory remarks. Presenters included Dick Lynch of Verizon, Tim Nulty of ECFiber, Herman Wagter of Citynet Amsterdam, David Reed with CableLabs, Johan Henæs of INS Communications, among others.

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Education

FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel Unveils Proposed Rules for Emergency Connectivity Fund

Acting FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel on Friday released rules for the Emergency Connectivity Fund, answering many questions about the program.

Benjamin Kahn

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Photo of Jessica Rosenworcel from the FCC

WASHINGTON, November 19, 2009 – Broadband speeds are important because technologies such as multi-way high definition video communication require next generation services to run, Benoit Felten of the Yankee Group said during a Federal Communications Commission meeting Thursday.

Felten said he expects in the next few years there will be many more offerings of 100 megabytes or higher broadband service that homes can subscribe to for reasonable prices, but currently this speed can only be found mainly in parts of the European Union or Asia. Felten, who was one of many experts the FCC had outline the specifics of broadband technology, focused his talk on fiber deployments around the world.

Other speakers discussed fiber distribution topology, fiber distribution technology, and hybrid fiber solutions where fiber to the neighborhood is delivered to the end-user by non-fiber methods. Speakers outlined their current experience with certain fiber networks and anticipated improvements on the technology front.

David Isenberg, senior advisor for the FCC’s National Broadband Plan, provided the introductory remarks. Presenters included Dick Lynch of Verizon, Tim Nulty of ECFiber, Herman Wagter of Citynet Amsterdam, David Reed with CableLabs, Johan Henæs of INS Communications, among others.

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Broadband's Impact

FCC Fines Company $4.1 Million for Slamming and Cramming Consumer Phone Lines

The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday fined Tele Circuit Network Corporation for switching consumers’ service providers.

Benjamin Kahn

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Photo of Geoffrey Starks by Amelia Holowaty Krales of the Verge

WASHINGTON, November 19, 2009 – Broadband speeds are important because technologies such as multi-way high definition video communication require next generation services to run, Benoit Felten of the Yankee Group said during a Federal Communications Commission meeting Thursday.

Felten said he expects in the next few years there will be many more offerings of 100 megabytes or higher broadband service that homes can subscribe to for reasonable prices, but currently this speed can only be found mainly in parts of the European Union or Asia. Felten, who was one of many experts the FCC had outline the specifics of broadband technology, focused his talk on fiber deployments around the world.

Other speakers discussed fiber distribution topology, fiber distribution technology, and hybrid fiber solutions where fiber to the neighborhood is delivered to the end-user by non-fiber methods. Speakers outlined their current experience with certain fiber networks and anticipated improvements on the technology front.

David Isenberg, senior advisor for the FCC’s National Broadband Plan, provided the introductory remarks. Presenters included Dick Lynch of Verizon, Tim Nulty of ECFiber, Herman Wagter of Citynet Amsterdam, David Reed with CableLabs, Johan Henæs of INS Communications, among others.

Continue Reading

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