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Net Neutrality Step Aside, Carbon Neutrality Is Moving In

WASHINGTON, November 9, 2009 – While some tech companies have sought to reduce their carbon footprint in the world, a number of them have been reluctant to do this. Instead, they have been buying into environmentally-friendly projects meant to offset their carbon emissions. While technology companies have considered carbon offset projects, such as investing in a forest sequestration project to balance out there carbon emissions, more are opting to place greater emphasis on developing innovative solutions to reduce energy consumption within company walls.

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WASHINGTON, November 9, 2009 – While some tech companies have sought to reduce their carbon footprint in the world, a number of them have been reluctant to do this. Instead, they have been buying into environmentally-friendly projects meant to offset their carbon emissions.

While technology companies have considered carbon offset projects, such as investing in a forest sequestration project to balance out there carbon emissions, more are opting to place greater emphasis on developing innovative solutions to reduce energy consumption within company walls.

But companies such as Google and Dell, who have committed themselves to being “carbon neutral,” say that they have needed the carbon offset projects to meet their goals. Other companies, such as Hewlett-Packard and Yahoo, have moved away from offset investments.

Google Green Energy Czar Bill Weihl’s wrote in a blog post in May 2009 that the company has been honoring its 2007 commitment to being “carbon neutral” through calculating its global carbon footprint and purchasing high-quality carbon offsets. “We’ll continue to invest in offset projects until we reach carbon neutrality,” read the blog.

However, Google’s blog notes that “While offsets with strong additionality can achieve real emissions reductions in unregulated sectors at a relatively low cost, we view them as a short-term solution for Google, not as a substitute for other action.”

The company said that offsets “provide a way for us to take responsibility for our emissions now, while we continue to advocate the development of utility-scale renewable energy. Current standards for offsets require a significant amount of work to evaluate the quality of each offset project and ensure that projects go beyond ‘business as usual.’ Stronger additionality standards – that are more stringent, clear, and objective – would also make it simpler for corporations like Google to use offsets as part of an overall strategy to neutralize emissions.”

Google said it plans to continue to purchase offsets but will focus on engineering technology solutions, using on-site renewable energy to power its facilities and look to design more energy efficient data centers.
Dell said in a September 2009 release that it has reduced its net greenhouse gas emissions by more than 18 percent in its fiscal year 2009 over fiscal year 2008.

The company has been reducing its total electricity consumption, using renewable energy sources and investing in carbon offsets.

Dell “offsets its remaining carbon impact by purchasing credible, third-party-verified renewable energy credits. This investment helped the company become the only company in the computer industry to achieve operational carbon neutrality in August 2008, five months ahead of schedule,” according to the company’s statement.

But while Google and Dell continue to invest in carbon offset projects, Yahoo announced this year that it will no longer purchase any offsets and HP spoke critically of them in its blog.

Yahoo’s David Filo wrote in a June blog entry that the company would stop investing in carbon offset projects. “Reducing our carbon footprint has always been a priority and we’ve decided to focus all our energy and investment on that philosophy. We will no longer purchase carbon offsets as announced in 2007.” Filo said his company plans to focus on reducing its own carbon impact by creating highly-efficient data centers.

According to a September blog entry from Hewlett-Packard, “A number of electronic companies have claimed to be “carbon neutral” at this point in time” and claim to “achieve this through the use of Carbon offset which are actually put in question by a number of studies.”

Another entry from the blog, which is generated by a team of members of HP’s global manufacturing and distribution industries, continues that, “HP’s progress on the green front “is due to its long term commitment to reducing the environmental footprint of all its operations, and not based on carbon offset or any other substitution program.”

The Broadband Breakfast Club

Editor’s Note: Join the next Broadband Breakfast Club on Tuesday, November 10, 2009, when a panel of experts – including Jennifer Alcott, Telework!VA Program Manager, Commonwealth of Virginia; Kevin Moss, Head of Corporate Social Responsibility, BT Americas; Steven Ruth, Professor, George Mason University School of Public Policy; and Donald L. Thoma, Executive Vice President Marketing, Iridium – will discuss “Setting the Table for the National Broadband Plan: The Environment.”

Among the questions to be considered are how carbon-positive a technology is broadband? What’s keeping telecommuting from being more widely adopted as a technology? What are the other “green” benefits of broadband communication, and how can the National Broadband Plan best encourage them? Register athttp://broadbandbreakfast.eventbrite.com

Winter covered technology policy issues for five-and-a-half years as a reporter for the National Journal Group. She has worked for USA Today, the Washington Times, the Magazine Group, the State Department’s International Visitor’s Program, and the Council on Hemispheric Affairs. She also taught English at a university in Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

Advanced Energy

White House Launches ‘Smart City’ Initiative That Links Broadband Connectivity to Urban Solutions

WASHINGTON, September 16, 2015 – A movement to make cities “smart” by using the power of broadband and information technology processing power is reaching critical mass, with the White House on Monday announcing a comprehensive initiative to support municipal efforts.

Coinciding with the Smart Cities Week conference here this week, the White House released a 4,000-word summary of more than $160 million in federal research investments, leveraging more than 25 technology collaborations with local communities.

The goal of these efforts? Tackling such key challenges, in the words of the White House, as “reducing traffic congestion, fighting crime, fostering economic growth, managing the effects of a changing climate, and improving the delivery of city services.”

“Advances in science and technology have the potential to accelerate these efforts,” read the White House statement. “An emerging community of civic leaders, data scientists, technologists, and companies are joining forces to build ‘Smart Cities’ – communities that are building an infrastructure to continuously improve the collection, aggregation, and use of data to improve the life of their residents – by harnessing the growing data revolution, low-cost sensors, and research collaborations, and doing so securely to protect safety and privacy.”

The launch of White House Smart Cities Initiative

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WASHINGTON, September 16, 2015 – A movement to make cities “smart” by using the power of broadband and information technology processing power is reaching critical mass, with the White House on Monday announcing a comprehensive initiative to support municipal efforts.

Coinciding with the Smart Cities Week conference here this week, the White House released a 4,000-word summary of more than $160 million in federal research investments, leveraging more than 25 technology collaborations with local communities.

The goal of these efforts? Tackling such key challenges, in the words of the White House, as “reducing traffic congestion, fighting crime, fostering economic growth, managing the effects of a changing climate, and improving the delivery of city services.”

“Advances in science and technology have the potential to accelerate these efforts,” read the White House statement. “An emerging community of civic leaders, data scientists, technologists, and companies are joining forces to build ‘Smart Cities’ – communities that are building an infrastructure to continuously improve the collection, aggregation, and use of data to improve the life of their residents – by harnessing the growing data revolution, low-cost sensors, and research collaborations, and doing so securely to protect safety and privacy.”

The launch of White House Smart Cities Initiative

The launch of White House Smart Cities Initiative

None of these Smart City innovations would be possible without the connectivity enabled by fiber-optic networks. These new opportunities for city services may prove to be the most effective driver of Gigabit Networks. As I wrote in an article last December on “The Year of Community and Municipal Gigabit Broadband,” this is “a world in which cities and municipalities are playing the leadership role.”

The White House Weighs In

Among the most significant facets of the administration’s announcement include:

  • More than $45 million in grants and investment for Smart City research and infrastructure by the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.
  • Nearly $70 million in new spending for technologies to promote solutions in public safety, energy, climate preparedness, transportation and health by federal agencies.
  • More than 20 cities participating in multi-party efforts “that will help city leaders effectively collaboration with universities and industry.”

In a separate statement on the White House web site, Dan Correa, administration senior adviser for innovation policy, wrote:

By coordinating adjacent traffic signals to optimize local traffic throughput, a pilot project in Pittsburgh has reduced commuting travel times by more than 25 percent, on average. In Louisville, the city is using data gathered from sensor-equipped asthma inhalers to understand the connection between asthma “hotspots” and air quality levels and other environmental factors in order to inform policymaking and community-level interventions.

One new aspect of the Obama Administration’s Smart Cities Initiative will be a focus on creating new technological test beds for “Internet of Things” applications.

Another will  be collaboration with the civic tech movement, the “growing community of individuals, entrepreneurs, and nonprofits interested in harnessing [information technology] to tackle local problems and work directly with city governments.”

In a manner similar to the way open source technology allows new innovators to build upon others’ software, this “open data” movement allows entities outside of government to make use of government data streams in real time.

Additionally, the White House said, the government plans to use other federal agency research — from sensor networks to broadband infrastructure — in its Smart City efforts, and to pursue international collaboration, particularly research aimed at climate and resource demand.

The agency also announced the release of a new framework for coordinating actions by a range of federal agencies, and a science and technologies priorities memo that will impact the administration’s pending 2017 budget proposal.

Actions by Cities and the Private Sector

In addition to White House and federal agency developments, more than 20 city-university collaborations are taking part in what is being called the MetroLab Network.

These collaborations include:

•        Atlanta, with Georgia State University and Georgia Tech

•        Boston, with Boston Area Research Initiative

•        Chicago, with the University of Chicago

•        Cuyahoga County, with Case Western University

•        Dallas, with Texas Research Alliance

•        Detroit, with Wayne State University

•        Houston, with Rice University

•        Madison, with University of Wisconsin-Madison

•        Memphis, with University of Memphis

•        Minneapolis & St. Paul, with University of Minnesota

•        Montgomery County, with University of Maryland and Universities at Shady Grove

•        New York City, with New York University

•        Philadelphia, with Drexel University and University of Pennsylvania

•        Pittsburgh, with Carnegie Mellon University

•        Portland, with Portland State University

•        Providence, with Brown University, College Unbound, and Rhode Island School of Design

•        San Diego, with University of California San Diego

•        San Jose, with San Jose State University

•        Seattle, with University of Washington

•        South Bend, with University of Notre Dame

•        Washington, DC, with Howard University, Georgetown University, and George Washington University

And among the more than 60 Smart City pilots taking place over the next year include:

  • City Digital, a Chicago-based consortium, focusing on urban infrastructure challenges
  • Dallas Innovation Alliance effort to enhance infrastructure, mobility and connected living
  • An IBM deployment of a Smarter Cities Challenge team in Detroit for cost-efficient removal and recycling of debris from abandoned and neglected properties
  • The National League of Cities and 25 local government and the 2015 winners of its Multi-City Innovation Campaign: The Bluelight mobile 911 application, and Ride, a collaborative tool for analyzing bicycling data.
  • New York City’s new neighborhood innovation labs that will leverage Mayor Bill DeBlasio’s efforts to expand a free public WiFi network throughout the city.

Drew Clark is the Chairman of the Broadband Breakfast Club. He tracks the development of Gigabit Networks, broadband usage, the universal service fund and wireless policy @BroadbandCensus. He is also Of Counsel with the firm of Best Best & Krieger LLP, with offices in California and Washington, DC. He works with cities, special districts and private companies on planning, financing and coordinating efforts of the many partners necessary to construct broadband infrastructure and deploy “Smart City” applications. You can find him on LinkedIN and Twitter. The articles and posts on BroadbandBreakfast.com and affiliated social media are not legal advice or legal services, do not constitute the creation of an attorney-client privilege, and represent the views of their respective authors.

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Broadband's Impact

Global Cities Teams Challenges Next Round: Nov. 12-13, 2015

Editor’s Note: We’ve received this note from the Global Cities Teams Challenges of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and US Ignite. Read more about the these important challenges.

Save the Date – An Important Event Related to the Next Round of the Global Cities Teams Challenge: November 12-13, 2015

Municipal leaders and innovators will gather at the NIST Campus in Gaithersburg, Maryland on November 12-13 for an important event related to the next round of Global City Team Challenge (GCTC). An agenda for the November event and a summary of exciting changes that NIST and US Ignite have planned for the next round of the GCTC will be circulated soon.

[more…]

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Editor’s Note: We’ve received this note from the Global Cities Teams Challenges of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and US Ignite. Read more about the these important challenges.

Save the Date – An Important Event Related to the Next Round of the Global Cities Teams Challenge: November 12-13, 2015

Municipal leaders and innovators will gather at the NIST Campus in Gaithersburg, Maryland on November 12-13 for an important event related to the next round of Global City Team Challenge (GCTC). An agenda for the November event and a summary of exciting changes that NIST and US Ignite have planned for the next round of the GCTC will be circulated soon.

In the meantime, if your plans include participating in Smart Cities Week (September 15-17), we hope you will consider joining NIST and US Ignite for a program titled “Accelerating Smart City Deployments: Challenges, Competitions and Collaborations from Smart Cities Around the Globe and Across the Region.” The program will take place on September 17 from 1:00pm to 5:30pm and will feature a preview of the next round of GCTC and a panel discussion on “What is Working,” featuring leaders from around the world and across the DC region.

Two more sessions at Smart Cities Week will be moderated by GCTC and feature GCTC team members:

My best for these final remaining weeks of summer. Look forward to seeing many of you in November!

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Infrastructure

Update on the Global City Teams Challenge and Recently Announced NSF Funding Opportunities

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Editor’s Note: We received this announcement on Wednesday afternoon about the very exciting Global City Teams Challenge, which has been supported by US Ignite:

The Global City Teams Challenge (GCTC) was successfully launched by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and US Ignite with a kick-off event at NIST on September 29-30. At this two day event, we had more than 350 on-site and remote attendees who came together to present project ideas and form Action Clusters on cyber-physical systems (CPS) and Internet of Things (IoT) for smart cities around the world. As of today, we have over 25 Action Clusters formed in energy, transportation, healthcare, disaster response, and many other sectors, working to demonstrate the deployments of scalable, replicable, and interoperable smart city solutions by June 2015. A current list of Action Clusters can be found at globalcityteams.org.

We are excited to announce that the National Science Foundation (NSF), one of the primary partners in the Challenge, has released an invitation to GCTC participants to submit proposals for up to $300,000 in funding. Detailed information about NSF’s Early-Concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER) proposals to support GCTC participants can be found here: http://1.usa.gov/1Eu2jwN

The deadline for submission of EAGERs is January 15, 2015, but earlier submissions are encouraged, and decisions will be made on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Additionally, NSF released a solicitation that makes available up to $4 million for the development of next-generation Internet applications. Many projects being pursued by GCTC participants are aligned with the NSF’s solicitation, as it identifies national priorities including clean energy, transportation, health information technology, public safety/emergency preparedness, cyberlearning, and/or advanced manufacturing.

More detailed information can be found here: NSF 15-508. Application for this solicitation are also due January 15.

Of course, if you have not yet connected your CPS project or your next-generation network/IoT project with the Global City Teams Challenge, it is not too late!

LEARN MORE ABOUT NSF FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES:

US Ignite will host a webinar on Monday. November 17th at 3pm (US-Eastern) that will provide insights into the application process and outline the benefits of being a GCTC participant.

Date: Monday, November 17, 2014
Time: 3:00PM Eastern
Log-in Information:
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/765269669
Via Phone: Dial +1 (872) 240-3212
Access Code: 765-269-669

CONNECT YOUR PROJECT TO THE GLOBAL CITY TEAMS CHALLENGE:

We are very excited at the progress all the teams are making so far, and would love to see more Action Clusters stand up around the world. Please don’t hesitate to let us know if you have any questions. We are here to help make your GCTC project a great success.

Thank you for your continued interest in the Global City Teams Challenge.

Joe Kochan
US Ignite

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