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ALA Says Public Libraries Are One Key Solution to Broadband Adoption

The American Library Association on Wednesday submitted comments (PDF) to the Federal Communications Commission addressing broadband adoption. The ALA filed the comments in response to the FCC’s call for input about adoption as it relates to the National Broadband Plan.

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The American Library Association on Wednesday submitted comments (PDF) to the Federal Communications Commission addressing broadband adoption. The ALA filed the comments in response to the FCC’s call for input about adoption as it relates to the National Broadband Plan.

The comments seek to address concerns about measuring broadband adoption, the societal cost of non-adopters, and identifying and remedying barriers to adoption.

The ALA focused on the role that public libraries can play, not only improving access to broadband, but increasing digital literacy and breaking down those barriers to adoption. Libraries have a long history of tailoring their services to meet the needs of patrons and helping citizens participate in a digital world simply follows that pattern, the ALA said.

“Access to broadband alone does not constitute adoption. There are three factors that must be present to ensure adoption:

  1. ease of use,
  2. individual comfort with technology, and
  3. an ability to find, utilize, and, increasingly, create relevant content.

The implicit goal of the national broadband plan is not to have the infrastructure in place to provide access to the Internet, but rather to ensure that every individual can benefit from the resources made available by that infrastructure.”

Public libraries could play a unique role in the achievement of that goal, said the ALA.

“Public libraries offer formal, no-fee technology training and point-of-need assistance to anyone who comes into the library,” says Marijke Visser, information technology policy analyst for ALA’s Office for Technology Policy (OITP).

“As more critical resources, such as job applications and government services, are available primarily online, the societal cost of not being able to access these resources increases dramatically. We encourage the FCC to consider the support and teaching libraries provide. It is critical that the FCC includes libraries in the national broadband plan in order to ensure that libraries have high-capacity broadband necessary to provide these services.”

Broadband Breakfast is a decade-old news organization based in Washington that is building a community of interest around broadband policy and internet technology, with a particular focus on better broadband infrastructure, the politics of privacy and the regulation of social media. Learn more about Broadband Breakfast.

Broadband Data

U.S. Broadband Deployment and Speeds are Beating Europe’s, Says Scholar Touting ‘Facilities-based Competition’

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The American Library Association on Wednesday submitted comments (PDF) to the Federal Communications Commission addressing broadband adoption. The ALA filed the comments in response to the FCC’s call for input about adoption as it relates to the National Broadband Plan.

The comments seek to address concerns about measuring broadband adoption, the societal cost of non-adopters, and identifying and remedying barriers to adoption.

The ALA focused on the role that public libraries can play, not only improving access to broadband, but increasing digital literacy and breaking down those barriers to adoption. Libraries have a long history of tailoring their services to meet the needs of patrons and helping citizens participate in a digital world simply follows that pattern, the ALA said.

“Access to broadband alone does not constitute adoption. There are three factors that must be present to ensure adoption:

  1. ease of use,
  2. individual comfort with technology, and
  3. an ability to find, utilize, and, increasingly, create relevant content.

The implicit goal of the national broadband plan is not to have the infrastructure in place to provide access to the Internet, but rather to ensure that every individual can benefit from the resources made available by that infrastructure.”

Public libraries could play a unique role in the achievement of that goal, said the ALA.

“Public libraries offer formal, no-fee technology training and point-of-need assistance to anyone who comes into the library,” says Marijke Visser, information technology policy analyst for ALA’s Office for Technology Policy (OITP).

“As more critical resources, such as job applications and government services, are available primarily online, the societal cost of not being able to access these resources increases dramatically. We encourage the FCC to consider the support and teaching libraries provide. It is critical that the FCC includes libraries in the national broadband plan in order to ensure that libraries have high-capacity broadband necessary to provide these services.”

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Broadband Updates

Discussion of Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event on High-Capacity Applications and Gigabit Connectivity

WASHINGTON, September 24, 2013 – The Broadband Breakfast Club released the first video of its Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event, on “How High-Capacity Applications Are Driving Gigabit Connectivity.”

The dialogue featured Dr. Glenn Ricart, Chief Technology Officer, US IGNITESheldon Grizzle of GigTank in Chattanooga, Tennessee; Todd MarriottExecutive Director of UTOPIA, the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency, and Drew ClarkChairman and Publisher, BroadbandBreakfast.com.

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The American Library Association on Wednesday submitted comments (PDF) to the Federal Communications Commission addressing broadband adoption. The ALA filed the comments in response to the FCC’s call for input about adoption as it relates to the National Broadband Plan.

The comments seek to address concerns about measuring broadband adoption, the societal cost of non-adopters, and identifying and remedying barriers to adoption.

The ALA focused on the role that public libraries can play, not only improving access to broadband, but increasing digital literacy and breaking down those barriers to adoption. Libraries have a long history of tailoring their services to meet the needs of patrons and helping citizens participate in a digital world simply follows that pattern, the ALA said.

“Access to broadband alone does not constitute adoption. There are three factors that must be present to ensure adoption:

  1. ease of use,
  2. individual comfort with technology, and
  3. an ability to find, utilize, and, increasingly, create relevant content.

The implicit goal of the national broadband plan is not to have the infrastructure in place to provide access to the Internet, but rather to ensure that every individual can benefit from the resources made available by that infrastructure.”

Public libraries could play a unique role in the achievement of that goal, said the ALA.

“Public libraries offer formal, no-fee technology training and point-of-need assistance to anyone who comes into the library,” says Marijke Visser, information technology policy analyst for ALA’s Office for Technology Policy (OITP).

“As more critical resources, such as job applications and government services, are available primarily online, the societal cost of not being able to access these resources increases dramatically. We encourage the FCC to consider the support and teaching libraries provide. It is critical that the FCC includes libraries in the national broadband plan in order to ensure that libraries have high-capacity broadband necessary to provide these services.”

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Breakfast Club Video: ‘Gigabit and Ultra-High-Speed Networks: Where They Stand Now and How They Are Building the Future’

Published

on

The American Library Association on Wednesday submitted comments (PDF) to the Federal Communications Commission addressing broadband adoption. The ALA filed the comments in response to the FCC’s call for input about adoption as it relates to the National Broadband Plan.

The comments seek to address concerns about measuring broadband adoption, the societal cost of non-adopters, and identifying and remedying barriers to adoption.

The ALA focused on the role that public libraries can play, not only improving access to broadband, but increasing digital literacy and breaking down those barriers to adoption. Libraries have a long history of tailoring their services to meet the needs of patrons and helping citizens participate in a digital world simply follows that pattern, the ALA said.

“Access to broadband alone does not constitute adoption. There are three factors that must be present to ensure adoption:

  1. ease of use,
  2. individual comfort with technology, and
  3. an ability to find, utilize, and, increasingly, create relevant content.

The implicit goal of the national broadband plan is not to have the infrastructure in place to provide access to the Internet, but rather to ensure that every individual can benefit from the resources made available by that infrastructure.”

Public libraries could play a unique role in the achievement of that goal, said the ALA.

“Public libraries offer formal, no-fee technology training and point-of-need assistance to anyone who comes into the library,” says Marijke Visser, information technology policy analyst for ALA’s Office for Technology Policy (OITP).

“As more critical resources, such as job applications and government services, are available primarily online, the societal cost of not being able to access these resources increases dramatically. We encourage the FCC to consider the support and teaching libraries provide. It is critical that the FCC includes libraries in the national broadband plan in order to ensure that libraries have high-capacity broadband necessary to provide these services.”

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