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AT&T Wants Phase Out Of Old Telephone Technologies

WASHINGTON, December 31, 2009 – A key component of formulating a National Broadband Plan should be an end to regulatory requirements that prolong the life of public switched telephone network and plain-old telephone service, AT&T said in comments it filed to the FCC on December 21.

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WASHINGTON, December 31, 2009 – A key component of formulating a National Broadband Plan should be an end to regulatory requirements that prolong the life of public switched telephone network and plain-old telephone service, AT&T said in comments it filed to the FCC on December 21.

“Any such forward-looking policy must enable a shift in investment from the legacy [public switched telephone network] to newly deployed broadband infrastructure. While broadband usage – and the importance of broadband to Americans’ lives – is growing every day, the business model for legacy phone services is in a death spiral,” wrote AT&T.

“Revenues from [plain-old telephone service] are plummeting as customers cut their landlines in favor of the convenience and advanced features of wireless and VoIP services,” wrote AT&T.

“At the same time, due to the high fixed costs of providing POTS, every customer who abandons this service raises the average cost-per-line to serve the remaining customers. With an outdated product, falling revenues, and rising costs, the POTS business is unsustainable for the long run. Yet a web of federal and state regulations has the cumulative effect of prolonging, unnecessarily, the life of POTS and the PSTN,” the company continued.

AT&T said that it is not clear if public switched telephone network and plain-old telephone service will survive.

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FCC

Former FCC Chairmen Hope for Rebirth of Tax Certificate That Bolstered Minority Voices on Broadcast

Recent conversations about revamping the program are inspired by the possibility of growth in diversity in broadcasting.

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Former FCC chairman Richard Wiley

WASHINGTON, December 31, 2009 – A key component of formulating a National Broadband Plan should be an end to regulatory requirements that prolong the life of public switched telephone network and plain-old telephone service, AT&T said in comments it filed to the FCC on December 21.

“Any such forward-looking policy must enable a shift in investment from the legacy [public switched telephone network] to newly deployed broadband infrastructure. While broadband usage – and the importance of broadband to Americans’ lives – is growing every day, the business model for legacy phone services is in a death spiral,” wrote AT&T.

“Revenues from [plain-old telephone service] are plummeting as customers cut their landlines in favor of the convenience and advanced features of wireless and VoIP services,” wrote AT&T.

“At the same time, due to the high fixed costs of providing POTS, every customer who abandons this service raises the average cost-per-line to serve the remaining customers. With an outdated product, falling revenues, and rising costs, the POTS business is unsustainable for the long run. Yet a web of federal and state regulations has the cumulative effect of prolonging, unnecessarily, the life of POTS and the PSTN,” the company continued.

AT&T said that it is not clear if public switched telephone network and plain-old telephone service will survive.

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5G

FCC Commissioner Carr Discusses Benefits Of “Light Touch” Regulation And Open RAN

Carr credited the U.S.’s success in telecom to policies that were implemented by the FCC under the Trump administration.

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FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr

WASHINGTON, December 31, 2009 – A key component of formulating a National Broadband Plan should be an end to regulatory requirements that prolong the life of public switched telephone network and plain-old telephone service, AT&T said in comments it filed to the FCC on December 21.

“Any such forward-looking policy must enable a shift in investment from the legacy [public switched telephone network] to newly deployed broadband infrastructure. While broadband usage – and the importance of broadband to Americans’ lives – is growing every day, the business model for legacy phone services is in a death spiral,” wrote AT&T.

“Revenues from [plain-old telephone service] are plummeting as customers cut their landlines in favor of the convenience and advanced features of wireless and VoIP services,” wrote AT&T.

“At the same time, due to the high fixed costs of providing POTS, every customer who abandons this service raises the average cost-per-line to serve the remaining customers. With an outdated product, falling revenues, and rising costs, the POTS business is unsustainable for the long run. Yet a web of federal and state regulations has the cumulative effect of prolonging, unnecessarily, the life of POTS and the PSTN,” the company continued.

AT&T said that it is not clear if public switched telephone network and plain-old telephone service will survive.

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Education

FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel Unveils Proposed Rules for Emergency Connectivity Fund

Acting FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel on Friday released rules for the Emergency Connectivity Fund, answering many questions about the program.

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Photo of Jessica Rosenworcel from the FCC

WASHINGTON, December 31, 2009 – A key component of formulating a National Broadband Plan should be an end to regulatory requirements that prolong the life of public switched telephone network and plain-old telephone service, AT&T said in comments it filed to the FCC on December 21.

“Any such forward-looking policy must enable a shift in investment from the legacy [public switched telephone network] to newly deployed broadband infrastructure. While broadband usage – and the importance of broadband to Americans’ lives – is growing every day, the business model for legacy phone services is in a death spiral,” wrote AT&T.

“Revenues from [plain-old telephone service] are plummeting as customers cut their landlines in favor of the convenience and advanced features of wireless and VoIP services,” wrote AT&T.

“At the same time, due to the high fixed costs of providing POTS, every customer who abandons this service raises the average cost-per-line to serve the remaining customers. With an outdated product, falling revenues, and rising costs, the POTS business is unsustainable for the long run. Yet a web of federal and state regulations has the cumulative effect of prolonging, unnecessarily, the life of POTS and the PSTN,” the company continued.

AT&T said that it is not clear if public switched telephone network and plain-old telephone service will survive.

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