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‘Text4Baby’ Reported in Washington Post; Four Months After Broadband Breakfast Club

WASHINGTON, February 10, 2010 – The Washington Post on Tuesday reported about “Text4baby,” a new service offered by the government allowing expectant mothers to opt-in to receiving tips and text messages relating to their pregnancy. Participants of the Broadband Breakfast Club learned about the pending program four months ago, at the October 2009 breakfast forum.

Broadband Breakfast Staff

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WASHINGTON, February 10, 2010 – The Washington Post on Tuesday reported about “Text4baby,” a new service offered by the government allowing expectant mothers to opt-in to receiving tips and text messages relating to their pregnancy. Participants of the Broadband Breakfast Club learned about the pending program four months ago, at the October 2009 breakfast forum.

The service, according to Chief Technology Officer Aneesh Chopra, is “a historic collaboration between industry, the health community and government.” To participate, women send a text message with the word “baby” to the number 511411, and receive messages up to three times a week with tips and advice timed to the future mother’s expected date of delivery.

At the Broadband Breakfast Club on October 13, 2009, one of the participants previewed the then-pending service:

Ron Poropatich, a doctor and colonel in the U.S. Army , said that physicians dealing with returning active members of the military suffering from traumatic brain injuries or post-traumatic stress syndrome find that art of text messaging has become a vital source of scheduling and reminding.

“[Physicians] would send e-mails to patients in the military of when their appointments would be and the e-mail would be sent back because their e-mail boxes are full,” said Poropatich. “When we would ask them about it, they would say, ‘oh, just send me a text.’”

This advancement has been applied in other contexts, too. For example, expecting mothers are able to benefit from text messages about the need to obtain check-ups, exams, and even set up the bedrooms of their future babies, said Poropatich.

Click here to watch the FREE video of the October Broadband Breakfast Club. Click here to register for the March Broadband Breakfast Club.

Broadband Breakfast is a decade-old news organization based in Washington that is building a community of interest around broadband policy and internet technology, with a particular focus on better broadband infrastructure, the politics of privacy and the regulation of social media. Learn more about Broadband Breakfast.

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U.S. Broadband Deployment and Speeds are Beating Europe’s, Says Scholar Touting ‘Facilities-based Competition’

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WASHINGTON, February 10, 2010 – The Washington Post on Tuesday reported about “Text4baby,” a new service offered by the government allowing expectant mothers to opt-in to receiving tips and text messages relating to their pregnancy. Participants of the Broadband Breakfast Club learned about the pending program four months ago, at the October 2009 breakfast forum.

The service, according to Chief Technology Officer Aneesh Chopra, is “a historic collaboration between industry, the health community and government.” To participate, women send a text message with the word “baby” to the number 511411, and receive messages up to three times a week with tips and advice timed to the future mother’s expected date of delivery.

At the Broadband Breakfast Club on October 13, 2009, one of the participants previewed the then-pending service:

Ron Poropatich, a doctor and colonel in the U.S. Army , said that physicians dealing with returning active members of the military suffering from traumatic brain injuries or post-traumatic stress syndrome find that art of text messaging has become a vital source of scheduling and reminding.

“[Physicians] would send e-mails to patients in the military of when their appointments would be and the e-mail would be sent back because their e-mail boxes are full,” said Poropatich. “When we would ask them about it, they would say, ‘oh, just send me a text.’”

This advancement has been applied in other contexts, too. For example, expecting mothers are able to benefit from text messages about the need to obtain check-ups, exams, and even set up the bedrooms of their future babies, said Poropatich.

Click here to watch the FREE video of the October Broadband Breakfast Club. Click here to register for the March Broadband Breakfast Club.

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Broadband Updates

Discussion of Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event on High-Capacity Applications and Gigabit Connectivity

WASHINGTON, September 24, 2013 – The Broadband Breakfast Club released the first video of its Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event, on “How High-Capacity Applications Are Driving Gigabit Connectivity.”

The dialogue featured Dr. Glenn Ricart, Chief Technology Officer, US IGNITESheldon Grizzle of GigTank in Chattanooga, Tennessee; Todd MarriottExecutive Director of UTOPIA, the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency, and Drew ClarkChairman and Publisher, BroadbandBreakfast.com.

Drew Clark

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WASHINGTON, February 10, 2010 – The Washington Post on Tuesday reported about “Text4baby,” a new service offered by the government allowing expectant mothers to opt-in to receiving tips and text messages relating to their pregnancy. Participants of the Broadband Breakfast Club learned about the pending program four months ago, at the October 2009 breakfast forum.

The service, according to Chief Technology Officer Aneesh Chopra, is “a historic collaboration between industry, the health community and government.” To participate, women send a text message with the word “baby” to the number 511411, and receive messages up to three times a week with tips and advice timed to the future mother’s expected date of delivery.

At the Broadband Breakfast Club on October 13, 2009, one of the participants previewed the then-pending service:

Ron Poropatich, a doctor and colonel in the U.S. Army , said that physicians dealing with returning active members of the military suffering from traumatic brain injuries or post-traumatic stress syndrome find that art of text messaging has become a vital source of scheduling and reminding.

“[Physicians] would send e-mails to patients in the military of when their appointments would be and the e-mail would be sent back because their e-mail boxes are full,” said Poropatich. “When we would ask them about it, they would say, ‘oh, just send me a text.’”

This advancement has been applied in other contexts, too. For example, expecting mothers are able to benefit from text messages about the need to obtain check-ups, exams, and even set up the bedrooms of their future babies, said Poropatich.

Click here to watch the FREE video of the October Broadband Breakfast Club. Click here to register for the March Broadband Breakfast Club.

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Breakfast Club Video: ‘Gigabit and Ultra-High-Speed Networks: Where They Stand Now and How They Are Building the Future’

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WASHINGTON, February 10, 2010 – The Washington Post on Tuesday reported about “Text4baby,” a new service offered by the government allowing expectant mothers to opt-in to receiving tips and text messages relating to their pregnancy. Participants of the Broadband Breakfast Club learned about the pending program four months ago, at the October 2009 breakfast forum.

The service, according to Chief Technology Officer Aneesh Chopra, is “a historic collaboration between industry, the health community and government.” To participate, women send a text message with the word “baby” to the number 511411, and receive messages up to three times a week with tips and advice timed to the future mother’s expected date of delivery.

At the Broadband Breakfast Club on October 13, 2009, one of the participants previewed the then-pending service:

Ron Poropatich, a doctor and colonel in the U.S. Army , said that physicians dealing with returning active members of the military suffering from traumatic brain injuries or post-traumatic stress syndrome find that art of text messaging has become a vital source of scheduling and reminding.

“[Physicians] would send e-mails to patients in the military of when their appointments would be and the e-mail would be sent back because their e-mail boxes are full,” said Poropatich. “When we would ask them about it, they would say, ‘oh, just send me a text.’”

This advancement has been applied in other contexts, too. For example, expecting mothers are able to benefit from text messages about the need to obtain check-ups, exams, and even set up the bedrooms of their future babies, said Poropatich.

Click here to watch the FREE video of the October Broadband Breakfast Club. Click here to register for the March Broadband Breakfast Club.

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