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Broadband's Impact

Court Orders Google to Turn Over Wireless Data in Portland Case

WASHINGTON, May 31, 2010 – A U.S. District Court in Portland, Ore., has ordered Google to turn over wireless data from its Street View cars which was taken while photographing neighborhoods.

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WASHINGTON, May 31, 2010 – A U.S. District Court in Portland, Ore., has ordered Google to turn over wireless data from its Street View cars which was taken while photographing neighborhoods.

Google revealed that its Street View cars were collecting wireless data in April to enhance location-based services for  smartphones, but claimed that no personal information was being taken from the Wi-Fi networks.  Several lawsuits have been filed against Google, including the one in Portland, alleging that Google was collecting private information such as e-mails and video belonging to the owners of home Wi-Fi networks.

Last week Google chose to retain the data, and it is declining to comment on the lawsuits. Three federal lawmakers have requested that Google explain what its intentions were in regards to the information, and the Federal Trade Commission currently has an informal probe underway to investigate the allegations.

Broadband Breakfast is a decade-old news organization based in Washington that is building a community of interest around broadband policy and internet technology, with a particular focus on better broadband infrastructure, the politics of privacy and the regulation of social media. Learn more about Broadband Breakfast.

Broadband's Impact

Congress Must Prioritize Connectivity in Underserved Areas Over Higher Speeds

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Jim Hagedorn, R-Minnesota

WASHINGTON, May 31, 2010 – A U.S. District Court in Portland, Ore., has ordered Google to turn over wireless data from its Street View cars which was taken while photographing neighborhoods.

Google revealed that its Street View cars were collecting wireless data in April to enhance location-based services for  smartphones, but claimed that no personal information was being taken from the Wi-Fi networks.  Several lawsuits have been filed against Google, including the one in Portland, alleging that Google was collecting private information such as e-mails and video belonging to the owners of home Wi-Fi networks.

Last week Google chose to retain the data, and it is declining to comment on the lawsuits. Three federal lawmakers have requested that Google explain what its intentions were in regards to the information, and the Federal Trade Commission currently has an informal probe underway to investigate the allegations.

Continue Reading

Broadband's Impact

Symmetrical Gigabit Internet Attracting Business, Municipalities Attest

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Brittany Smith of the Gig East Exchange

WASHINGTON, May 31, 2010 – A U.S. District Court in Portland, Ore., has ordered Google to turn over wireless data from its Street View cars which was taken while photographing neighborhoods.

Google revealed that its Street View cars were collecting wireless data in April to enhance location-based services for  smartphones, but claimed that no personal information was being taken from the Wi-Fi networks.  Several lawsuits have been filed against Google, including the one in Portland, alleging that Google was collecting private information such as e-mails and video belonging to the owners of home Wi-Fi networks.

Last week Google chose to retain the data, and it is declining to comment on the lawsuits. Three federal lawmakers have requested that Google explain what its intentions were in regards to the information, and the Federal Trade Commission currently has an informal probe underway to investigate the allegations.

Continue Reading

Digital Inclusion

Senators Reintroduce Bipartisan Digital Equity Act

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Patty Murray, D-Washington

WASHINGTON, May 31, 2010 – A U.S. District Court in Portland, Ore., has ordered Google to turn over wireless data from its Street View cars which was taken while photographing neighborhoods.

Google revealed that its Street View cars were collecting wireless data in April to enhance location-based services for  smartphones, but claimed that no personal information was being taken from the Wi-Fi networks.  Several lawsuits have been filed against Google, including the one in Portland, alleging that Google was collecting private information such as e-mails and video belonging to the owners of home Wi-Fi networks.

Last week Google chose to retain the data, and it is declining to comment on the lawsuits. Three federal lawmakers have requested that Google explain what its intentions were in regards to the information, and the Federal Trade Commission currently has an informal probe underway to investigate the allegations.

Continue Reading

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