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Irish ISP to Cut Off Illegal File Sharers

WASHINGTON, June 1, 2010 – Eircom, one of Ireland’s biggest internet service providers, will cut off access to users who have been accused of illegal file-sharing.

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WASHINGTON, June 1, 2010– Following a lawsuit by the Irish Recorded Music Association, Irish internet service provider Eircom has reached a settlement intended to stem the tide of illegal music downloads by its customers. Under the settlement, a strategy of “graduated response” will be employed to deter prospective pirates.

Eircom customers who are found to have engaged in illegal file-sharing will receive three warnings from the company to cease their illegal activity before Eircom will terminate their broadband internet access for set periods of time, beginning with a week on the fourth offense, a month on the fifth, and moving to a full year as the highest disciplinary measure. The plan will affect all of the 750,000 users currently using Eircom as their service provider, though its means of enforcement are still an open question, as Eircom has publicly stated that it does not intend to introduce monitoring software of any kind into its network. Offenders would receive warnings via letter, phone and pop-up ad before losing their access.

The plan has already faced legal obstacles, and may be limited in its appeal. Ireland’s Data Protection Commissioner Billy Hawke had previously filed suit unsuccessfully against it on privacy grounds, and other ISPs have declined to follow Eircom’s lead.

Broadband Breakfast is a decade-old news organization based in Washington that is building a community of interest around broadband policy and internet technology, with a particular focus on better broadband infrastructure, the politics of privacy and the regulation of social media. Learn more about Broadband Breakfast.

Broadband Data

U.S. Broadband Deployment and Speeds are Beating Europe’s, Says Scholar Touting ‘Facilities-based Competition’

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WASHINGTON, June 1, 2010– Following a lawsuit by the Irish Recorded Music Association, Irish internet service provider Eircom has reached a settlement intended to stem the tide of illegal music downloads by its customers. Under the settlement, a strategy of “graduated response” will be employed to deter prospective pirates.

Eircom customers who are found to have engaged in illegal file-sharing will receive three warnings from the company to cease their illegal activity before Eircom will terminate their broadband internet access for set periods of time, beginning with a week on the fourth offense, a month on the fifth, and moving to a full year as the highest disciplinary measure. The plan will affect all of the 750,000 users currently using Eircom as their service provider, though its means of enforcement are still an open question, as Eircom has publicly stated that it does not intend to introduce monitoring software of any kind into its network. Offenders would receive warnings via letter, phone and pop-up ad before losing their access.

The plan has already faced legal obstacles, and may be limited in its appeal. Ireland’s Data Protection Commissioner Billy Hawke had previously filed suit unsuccessfully against it on privacy grounds, and other ISPs have declined to follow Eircom’s lead.

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Broadband Updates

Discussion of Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event on High-Capacity Applications and Gigabit Connectivity

WASHINGTON, September 24, 2013 – The Broadband Breakfast Club released the first video of its Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event, on “How High-Capacity Applications Are Driving Gigabit Connectivity.”

The dialogue featured Dr. Glenn Ricart, Chief Technology Officer, US IGNITESheldon Grizzle of GigTank in Chattanooga, Tennessee; Todd MarriottExecutive Director of UTOPIA, the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency, and Drew ClarkChairman and Publisher, BroadbandBreakfast.com.

Published

on

WASHINGTON, June 1, 2010– Following a lawsuit by the Irish Recorded Music Association, Irish internet service provider Eircom has reached a settlement intended to stem the tide of illegal music downloads by its customers. Under the settlement, a strategy of “graduated response” will be employed to deter prospective pirates.

Eircom customers who are found to have engaged in illegal file-sharing will receive three warnings from the company to cease their illegal activity before Eircom will terminate their broadband internet access for set periods of time, beginning with a week on the fourth offense, a month on the fifth, and moving to a full year as the highest disciplinary measure. The plan will affect all of the 750,000 users currently using Eircom as their service provider, though its means of enforcement are still an open question, as Eircom has publicly stated that it does not intend to introduce monitoring software of any kind into its network. Offenders would receive warnings via letter, phone and pop-up ad before losing their access.

The plan has already faced legal obstacles, and may be limited in its appeal. Ireland’s Data Protection Commissioner Billy Hawke had previously filed suit unsuccessfully against it on privacy grounds, and other ISPs have declined to follow Eircom’s lead.

Continue Reading

#broadbandlive

Breakfast Club Video: ‘Gigabit and Ultra-High-Speed Networks: Where They Stand Now and How They Are Building the Future’

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on

WASHINGTON, June 1, 2010– Following a lawsuit by the Irish Recorded Music Association, Irish internet service provider Eircom has reached a settlement intended to stem the tide of illegal music downloads by its customers. Under the settlement, a strategy of “graduated response” will be employed to deter prospective pirates.

Eircom customers who are found to have engaged in illegal file-sharing will receive three warnings from the company to cease their illegal activity before Eircom will terminate their broadband internet access for set periods of time, beginning with a week on the fourth offense, a month on the fifth, and moving to a full year as the highest disciplinary measure. The plan will affect all of the 750,000 users currently using Eircom as their service provider, though its means of enforcement are still an open question, as Eircom has publicly stated that it does not intend to introduce monitoring software of any kind into its network. Offenders would receive warnings via letter, phone and pop-up ad before losing their access.

The plan has already faced legal obstacles, and may be limited in its appeal. Ireland’s Data Protection Commissioner Billy Hawke had previously filed suit unsuccessfully against it on privacy grounds, and other ISPs have declined to follow Eircom’s lead.

Continue Reading

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