Connect with us

Broadband Updates

FCC Accepting Applications for Native Nations Broadband Task Force

WASHINGTON, June 7, 2010 – The Federal Communications Commission has announced that it is accepting applications for membership in its newly-established Native Nations Broadband Task Force. The task force will create a forum in which Native American governments can voice their opinions and concerns as the FCC attempts to expand broadband access to tribal lands.

Broadband Breakfast Staff

Published

on

WASHINGTON, June 7, 2010 – The Federal Communications Commission has announced that it is accepting applications for membership in its newly-established Native Nations Broadband Task Force.

The task force will create a forum in which Native American governments can voice their opinions and concerns as the FCC attempts to expand broadband access to tribal lands. The task force also will be responsible for coordinating the different governments and federal agencies and departments in promoting broadband expansion.

Native American government leaders or their representatives may apply for membership in the task force by July 15. Applicants will be obligated to a two-year membership, and most meetings for the task force will take place in Washington, where travel costs will be at a member’s own expense. At these meetings, the members are asked to disclose any interests or connections to people or entities that will be regulated by the FCC.

The Native Nations Broadband Task Force is part of a National Broadband Plan initiative to connect Native American communities and tribal lands through broadband. The plan not only outlines the task force, but also contains plans for the FCC Office of Native American Affairs, which also is expected to launch this year.

Broadband Breakfast is a decade-old news organization based in Washington that is building a community of interest around broadband policy and internet technology, with a particular focus on better broadband infrastructure, the politics of privacy and the regulation of social media. Learn more about Broadband Breakfast.

Broadband Data

U.S. Broadband Deployment and Speeds are Beating Europe’s, Says Scholar Touting ‘Facilities-based Competition’

Avatar

Published

on

WASHINGTON, June 7, 2010 – The Federal Communications Commission has announced that it is accepting applications for membership in its newly-established Native Nations Broadband Task Force.

The task force will create a forum in which Native American governments can voice their opinions and concerns as the FCC attempts to expand broadband access to tribal lands. The task force also will be responsible for coordinating the different governments and federal agencies and departments in promoting broadband expansion.

Native American government leaders or their representatives may apply for membership in the task force by July 15. Applicants will be obligated to a two-year membership, and most meetings for the task force will take place in Washington, where travel costs will be at a member’s own expense. At these meetings, the members are asked to disclose any interests or connections to people or entities that will be regulated by the FCC.

The Native Nations Broadband Task Force is part of a National Broadband Plan initiative to connect Native American communities and tribal lands through broadband. The plan not only outlines the task force, but also contains plans for the FCC Office of Native American Affairs, which also is expected to launch this year.

Continue Reading

Broadband Updates

Discussion of Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event on High-Capacity Applications and Gigabit Connectivity

WASHINGTON, September 24, 2013 – The Broadband Breakfast Club released the first video of its Broadband Breakfast Club Virtual Event, on “How High-Capacity Applications Are Driving Gigabit Connectivity.”

The dialogue featured Dr. Glenn Ricart, Chief Technology Officer, US IGNITESheldon Grizzle of GigTank in Chattanooga, Tennessee; Todd MarriottExecutive Director of UTOPIA, the Utah Telecommunications Open Infrastructure Agency, and Drew ClarkChairman and Publisher, BroadbandBreakfast.com.

Drew Clark

Published

on

WASHINGTON, June 7, 2010 – The Federal Communications Commission has announced that it is accepting applications for membership in its newly-established Native Nations Broadband Task Force.

The task force will create a forum in which Native American governments can voice their opinions and concerns as the FCC attempts to expand broadband access to tribal lands. The task force also will be responsible for coordinating the different governments and federal agencies and departments in promoting broadband expansion.

Native American government leaders or their representatives may apply for membership in the task force by July 15. Applicants will be obligated to a two-year membership, and most meetings for the task force will take place in Washington, where travel costs will be at a member’s own expense. At these meetings, the members are asked to disclose any interests or connections to people or entities that will be regulated by the FCC.

The Native Nations Broadband Task Force is part of a National Broadband Plan initiative to connect Native American communities and tribal lands through broadband. The plan not only outlines the task force, but also contains plans for the FCC Office of Native American Affairs, which also is expected to launch this year.

Continue Reading

#broadbandlive

Breakfast Club Video: ‘Gigabit and Ultra-High-Speed Networks: Where They Stand Now and How They Are Building the Future’

Avatar

Published

on

WASHINGTON, June 7, 2010 – The Federal Communications Commission has announced that it is accepting applications for membership in its newly-established Native Nations Broadband Task Force.

The task force will create a forum in which Native American governments can voice their opinions and concerns as the FCC attempts to expand broadband access to tribal lands. The task force also will be responsible for coordinating the different governments and federal agencies and departments in promoting broadband expansion.

Native American government leaders or their representatives may apply for membership in the task force by July 15. Applicants will be obligated to a two-year membership, and most meetings for the task force will take place in Washington, where travel costs will be at a member’s own expense. At these meetings, the members are asked to disclose any interests or connections to people or entities that will be regulated by the FCC.

The Native Nations Broadband Task Force is part of a National Broadband Plan initiative to connect Native American communities and tribal lands through broadband. The plan not only outlines the task force, but also contains plans for the FCC Office of Native American Affairs, which also is expected to launch this year.

Continue Reading

Recent

Signup for Broadband Breakfast

Get twice-weekly Breakfast Media news alerts.
* = required field

Trending