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North Carolina Rejects Moratorium on Municipal Broadband

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WASHINGTON, July 14, 2010- On July 11 the North Carolina House of Representatives put an end to a bill that would ban communities from installing their own broadband infrastructure.

In the last year, several towns and cities built their own Fiber to the Home networks. The networks in North Carolina generally provide faster connections at lower rates than the existing carriers’ services.

As a result, existing carriers in North Carolina, including AT&T, Time Warner Cable, and CenturyLink, chose to litigate with the help of state senator David Hoyle. This is the fourth attempt by these carriers to block community-based fiber networks.

The North Carolina House of Representatives amended the bill to no longer include the moratorium. The only part of the bill that passed was a request for the House’s Revenue Laws Study Committee to examine the legality and circumstances of locally-provided broadband.

Broadband Breakfast is a decade-old news organization based in Washington that is building a community of interest around broadband policy and internet technology, with a particular focus on better broadband infrastructure, the politics of privacy and the regulation of social media. Learn more about Broadband Breakfast.

Fiber

Lower Deployment Costs Could Incent More Fiber Installs, Consultants Say

Consultancy says fiber deployment costs are going down, which could mean more pure fiber plays.

Published

on

Jack Burton of Broadband Success Partners

WASHINGTON, July 14, 2010- On July 11 the North Carolina House of Representatives put an end to a bill that would ban communities from installing their own broadband infrastructure.

In the last year, several towns and cities built their own Fiber to the Home networks. The networks in North Carolina generally provide faster connections at lower rates than the existing carriers’ services.

As a result, existing carriers in North Carolina, including AT&T, Time Warner Cable, and CenturyLink, chose to litigate with the help of state senator David Hoyle. This is the fourth attempt by these carriers to block community-based fiber networks.

The North Carolina House of Representatives amended the bill to no longer include the moratorium. The only part of the bill that passed was a request for the House’s Revenue Laws Study Committee to examine the legality and circumstances of locally-provided broadband.

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Open Access

Could And Should Future 5G Networks Include Open Core Access?

Experts argue the 5G core network may need to be open to fully realize goals of next-gen wireless networks.

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on

Thomas Magedanz of Fraunhofer Institute for Open Communication Systems

WASHINGTON, July 14, 2010- On July 11 the North Carolina House of Representatives put an end to a bill that would ban communities from installing their own broadband infrastructure.

In the last year, several towns and cities built their own Fiber to the Home networks. The networks in North Carolina generally provide faster connections at lower rates than the existing carriers’ services.

As a result, existing carriers in North Carolina, including AT&T, Time Warner Cable, and CenturyLink, chose to litigate with the help of state senator David Hoyle. This is the fourth attempt by these carriers to block community-based fiber networks.

The North Carolina House of Representatives amended the bill to no longer include the moratorium. The only part of the bill that passed was a request for the House’s Revenue Laws Study Committee to examine the legality and circumstances of locally-provided broadband.

Continue Reading

Fiber

Expert Touts Fiber As Only Method Of Deployment That Can Address Modern Broadband Needs

Ernesto Falcon of the EFF says expansion of fiber is the only way California keeps up with demand for broadband.

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on

Ernesto Falcon, left, of the Electronic Frontier Foundation

WASHINGTON, July 14, 2010- On July 11 the North Carolina House of Representatives put an end to a bill that would ban communities from installing their own broadband infrastructure.

In the last year, several towns and cities built their own Fiber to the Home networks. The networks in North Carolina generally provide faster connections at lower rates than the existing carriers’ services.

As a result, existing carriers in North Carolina, including AT&T, Time Warner Cable, and CenturyLink, chose to litigate with the help of state senator David Hoyle. This is the fourth attempt by these carriers to block community-based fiber networks.

The North Carolina House of Representatives amended the bill to no longer include the moratorium. The only part of the bill that passed was a request for the House’s Revenue Laws Study Committee to examine the legality and circumstances of locally-provided broadband.

Continue Reading

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