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Hawaii Rejects Smart-Grid Technology

WASHINGTON, August 2, 2010 – Regulators in the state of Hawaii have recently rejected a $115 million smart grid expansion project.

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WASHINGTON, August 2, 2010 – Regulators in the state of Hawaii have recently rejected a $115 million smart grid expansion project funded by residents and businesses. The project would have expanded smart grid to reach 451,000 locations. It was derailed after Hawaii’s Public Utilities Commission denied a request for expanded testing.

The “smart grid” model implies a process of installing new electric meters that can wirelessly communicate with utilities, allowing them to distribute power and handle additional renewable energy more efficiently. However, opponents say the model is just one of many options, all of which should be considered before the state makes a decision.

“Shouldn’t we start by asking, ‘What are the best choices, how much do they all cost?’ instead of, ‘Here’s the one we really like and here’s everything good about it?'” said Mark Duda, president of the Hawaii Solar Energy Association.

One of the key problems the regulators have with the smart grid proposal is its high cost, something which a comparable energy saving program like the installation of solar panels would blunt. Among those arguing for a solar solution is Henry Curtis of the environmental group Life on Land.

“This needs more public discussion before we jump in and pick a particular solution,” Curtis said. “In the long run, when we can create power at homes and businesses that supply all the needs of those buildings, then the grid is going to become obsolete.”

Broadband Breakfast is a decade-old news organization based in Washington that is building a community of interest around broadband policy and internet technology, with a particular focus on better broadband infrastructure, the politics of privacy and the regulation of social media. Learn more about Broadband Breakfast.

Advanced Energy

White House Launches ‘Smart City’ Initiative That Links Broadband Connectivity to Urban Solutions

WASHINGTON, September 16, 2015 – A movement to make cities “smart” by using the power of broadband and information technology processing power is reaching critical mass, with the White House on Monday announcing a comprehensive initiative to support municipal efforts.

Coinciding with the Smart Cities Week conference here this week, the White House released a 4,000-word summary of more than $160 million in federal research investments, leveraging more than 25 technology collaborations with local communities.

The goal of these efforts? Tackling such key challenges, in the words of the White House, as “reducing traffic congestion, fighting crime, fostering economic growth, managing the effects of a changing climate, and improving the delivery of city services.”

“Advances in science and technology have the potential to accelerate these efforts,” read the White House statement. “An emerging community of civic leaders, data scientists, technologists, and companies are joining forces to build ‘Smart Cities’ – communities that are building an infrastructure to continuously improve the collection, aggregation, and use of data to improve the life of their residents – by harnessing the growing data revolution, low-cost sensors, and research collaborations, and doing so securely to protect safety and privacy.”

The launch of White House Smart Cities Initiative

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WASHINGTON, August 2, 2010 – Regulators in the state of Hawaii have recently rejected a $115 million smart grid expansion project funded by residents and businesses. The project would have expanded smart grid to reach 451,000 locations. It was derailed after Hawaii’s Public Utilities Commission denied a request for expanded testing.

The “smart grid” model implies a process of installing new electric meters that can wirelessly communicate with utilities, allowing them to distribute power and handle additional renewable energy more efficiently. However, opponents say the model is just one of many options, all of which should be considered before the state makes a decision.

“Shouldn’t we start by asking, ‘What are the best choices, how much do they all cost?’ instead of, ‘Here’s the one we really like and here’s everything good about it?'” said Mark Duda, president of the Hawaii Solar Energy Association.

One of the key problems the regulators have with the smart grid proposal is its high cost, something which a comparable energy saving program like the installation of solar panels would blunt. Among those arguing for a solar solution is Henry Curtis of the environmental group Life on Land.

“This needs more public discussion before we jump in and pick a particular solution,” Curtis said. “In the long run, when we can create power at homes and businesses that supply all the needs of those buildings, then the grid is going to become obsolete.”

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Broadband's Impact

Global Cities Teams Challenges Next Round: Nov. 12-13, 2015

Editor’s Note: We’ve received this note from the Global Cities Teams Challenges of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and US Ignite. Read more about the these important challenges.

Save the Date – An Important Event Related to the Next Round of the Global Cities Teams Challenge: November 12-13, 2015

Municipal leaders and innovators will gather at the NIST Campus in Gaithersburg, Maryland on November 12-13 for an important event related to the next round of Global City Team Challenge (GCTC). An agenda for the November event and a summary of exciting changes that NIST and US Ignite have planned for the next round of the GCTC will be circulated soon.

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WASHINGTON, August 2, 2010 – Regulators in the state of Hawaii have recently rejected a $115 million smart grid expansion project funded by residents and businesses. The project would have expanded smart grid to reach 451,000 locations. It was derailed after Hawaii’s Public Utilities Commission denied a request for expanded testing.

The “smart grid” model implies a process of installing new electric meters that can wirelessly communicate with utilities, allowing them to distribute power and handle additional renewable energy more efficiently. However, opponents say the model is just one of many options, all of which should be considered before the state makes a decision.

“Shouldn’t we start by asking, ‘What are the best choices, how much do they all cost?’ instead of, ‘Here’s the one we really like and here’s everything good about it?'” said Mark Duda, president of the Hawaii Solar Energy Association.

One of the key problems the regulators have with the smart grid proposal is its high cost, something which a comparable energy saving program like the installation of solar panels would blunt. Among those arguing for a solar solution is Henry Curtis of the environmental group Life on Land.

“This needs more public discussion before we jump in and pick a particular solution,” Curtis said. “In the long run, when we can create power at homes and businesses that supply all the needs of those buildings, then the grid is going to become obsolete.”

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Infrastructure

Update on the Global City Teams Challenge and Recently Announced NSF Funding Opportunities

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WASHINGTON, August 2, 2010 – Regulators in the state of Hawaii have recently rejected a $115 million smart grid expansion project funded by residents and businesses. The project would have expanded smart grid to reach 451,000 locations. It was derailed after Hawaii’s Public Utilities Commission denied a request for expanded testing.

The “smart grid” model implies a process of installing new electric meters that can wirelessly communicate with utilities, allowing them to distribute power and handle additional renewable energy more efficiently. However, opponents say the model is just one of many options, all of which should be considered before the state makes a decision.

“Shouldn’t we start by asking, ‘What are the best choices, how much do they all cost?’ instead of, ‘Here’s the one we really like and here’s everything good about it?'” said Mark Duda, president of the Hawaii Solar Energy Association.

One of the key problems the regulators have with the smart grid proposal is its high cost, something which a comparable energy saving program like the installation of solar panels would blunt. Among those arguing for a solar solution is Henry Curtis of the environmental group Life on Land.

“This needs more public discussion before we jump in and pick a particular solution,” Curtis said. “In the long run, when we can create power at homes and businesses that supply all the needs of those buildings, then the grid is going to become obsolete.”

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