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Mobile Providers Seek Increased Access to Cuba

WASHINGTON, August 31, 2010 – Nokia, AT&T and Verizon are petitioning the White House to loosen telecommunications export bans to Cuba.

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WASHINGTON, August 31, 2010 – Nokia, AT&T and Verizon are petitioning the White House to loosen telecommunications export bans to Cuba, Bloomberg and other news outlets are reporting.

The Obama Administration eased some of the regulations in April 2009 and has spoken of increased engagement.

Nokia would like to sell handsets to the island, while AT&T and Verizon would like more freedom in connecting calls and setting up service.

The Federal Communications Commission allows calls to be connected to Cuba but only if they pay Cuba a fee of no more than 19 cents a call while the Cuban government requires a fee of 84 cents a call.

Finland-based Nokia produces its North American handsets in Miami and is limited by the U.S. embargo.

Cuba has a relatively low penetration level even after ruler Raul Castro lifted the ban in 2008.

Broadband Breakfast is a decade-old news organization based in Washington that is building a community of interest around broadband policy and internet technology, with a particular focus on better broadband infrastructure, the politics of privacy and the regulation of social media. Learn more about Broadband Breakfast.

China

Huawei’s Success In China A Win For Washington, Expert Says

The Chinese telecom giant is finding greater financial success on home turf, keeping it away from the U.S.

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on

Photo of Scott Malcomson via Inc.com

WASHINGTON, August 31, 2010 – Nokia, AT&T and Verizon are petitioning the White House to loosen telecommunications export bans to Cuba, Bloomberg and other news outlets are reporting.

The Obama Administration eased some of the regulations in April 2009 and has spoken of increased engagement.

Nokia would like to sell handsets to the island, while AT&T and Verizon would like more freedom in connecting calls and setting up service.

The Federal Communications Commission allows calls to be connected to Cuba but only if they pay Cuba a fee of no more than 19 cents a call while the Cuban government requires a fee of 84 cents a call.

Finland-based Nokia produces its North American handsets in Miami and is limited by the U.S. embargo.

Cuba has a relatively low penetration level even after ruler Raul Castro lifted the ban in 2008.

Continue Reading

Europe

Openreach Partners With STL For Fiber Build

Openreach aims to get 20 million fiber-to-the-premise connections by later this decade.

Published

on

Screenshot of STL's Ankit Agarwal via YouTube

WASHINGTON, August 31, 2010 – Nokia, AT&T and Verizon are petitioning the White House to loosen telecommunications export bans to Cuba, Bloomberg and other news outlets are reporting.

The Obama Administration eased some of the regulations in April 2009 and has spoken of increased engagement.

Nokia would like to sell handsets to the island, while AT&T and Verizon would like more freedom in connecting calls and setting up service.

The Federal Communications Commission allows calls to be connected to Cuba but only if they pay Cuba a fee of no more than 19 cents a call while the Cuban government requires a fee of 84 cents a call.

Finland-based Nokia produces its North American handsets in Miami and is limited by the U.S. embargo.

Cuba has a relatively low penetration level even after ruler Raul Castro lifted the ban in 2008.

Continue Reading

China

Loopholes Allowing Private Purchase Of Chinese Goods Must Be Closed: Commissioner Carr

Published

on

Screenshot taken from CSIS event

WASHINGTON, August 31, 2010 – Nokia, AT&T and Verizon are petitioning the White House to loosen telecommunications export bans to Cuba, Bloomberg and other news outlets are reporting.

The Obama Administration eased some of the regulations in April 2009 and has spoken of increased engagement.

Nokia would like to sell handsets to the island, while AT&T and Verizon would like more freedom in connecting calls and setting up service.

The Federal Communications Commission allows calls to be connected to Cuba but only if they pay Cuba a fee of no more than 19 cents a call while the Cuban government requires a fee of 84 cents a call.

Finland-based Nokia produces its North American handsets in Miami and is limited by the U.S. embargo.

Cuba has a relatively low penetration level even after ruler Raul Castro lifted the ban in 2008.

Continue Reading

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