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Broadband's Impact

Obama Administration Calls for Greater Disabled Access on Internet

WASHINGTON, August 3, 2010 –The Obama administration has made the expansion of telecommunications services to disabled people a top priority.

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WASHINGTON, August 3, 2010 –The Obama administration has made the expansion of telecommunications services to disabled people a top priority. The decision to release these proposals coincides with the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which the administration sees as an urgent piece of legislation for a time when technology is growing. The proposals may draw fire from businesses on the grounds of excessive cost.

Of the four proposals involved, two directly implicate the telecommunications industry. The first, simply titled “Web Accessibility,” seeks comment on how the Justice Department “can develop a workable framework for website access that provides individuals with disabilities access to the critical information, programs, and services provided on the web, while respecting the unique characteristics of the internet and its transformative impact on everyday life,” according to the Justice Department’s press release.

The second, meanwhile, calls for greater disabled access in internet-based 9-11 call centers. According to the press release, “The NG 9-1-1 ANPRM seeks information on how the centers may be able to provide direct access to 9-1-1 for individuals with disabilities as they implement new communication technologies.”

The other two proposals deal with closed captioning in movie theatres and disabled accessible furniture.

Broadband Breakfast is a decade-old news organization based in Washington that is building a community of interest around broadband policy and internet technology, with a particular focus on better broadband infrastructure, the politics of privacy and the regulation of social media. Learn more about Broadband Breakfast.

Broadband's Impact

Congress Must Prioritize Connectivity in Underserved Areas Over Higher Speeds

A House hearing debated the need for broadband and the higher speed thresholds currently before Congress.

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Jim Hagedorn, R-Minnesota

WASHINGTON, August 3, 2010 –The Obama administration has made the expansion of telecommunications services to disabled people a top priority. The decision to release these proposals coincides with the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which the administration sees as an urgent piece of legislation for a time when technology is growing. The proposals may draw fire from businesses on the grounds of excessive cost.

Of the four proposals involved, two directly implicate the telecommunications industry. The first, simply titled “Web Accessibility,” seeks comment on how the Justice Department “can develop a workable framework for website access that provides individuals with disabilities access to the critical information, programs, and services provided on the web, while respecting the unique characteristics of the internet and its transformative impact on everyday life,” according to the Justice Department’s press release.

The second, meanwhile, calls for greater disabled access in internet-based 9-11 call centers. According to the press release, “The NG 9-1-1 ANPRM seeks information on how the centers may be able to provide direct access to 9-1-1 for individuals with disabilities as they implement new communication technologies.”

The other two proposals deal with closed captioning in movie theatres and disabled accessible furniture.

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Broadband's Impact

Symmetrical Gigabit Internet Attracting Business, Municipalities Attest

Municipalities are raving about gigabit internet speeds as key to attracting businesses to their cities.

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Brittany Smith of the Gig East Exchange

WASHINGTON, August 3, 2010 –The Obama administration has made the expansion of telecommunications services to disabled people a top priority. The decision to release these proposals coincides with the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which the administration sees as an urgent piece of legislation for a time when technology is growing. The proposals may draw fire from businesses on the grounds of excessive cost.

Of the four proposals involved, two directly implicate the telecommunications industry. The first, simply titled “Web Accessibility,” seeks comment on how the Justice Department “can develop a workable framework for website access that provides individuals with disabilities access to the critical information, programs, and services provided on the web, while respecting the unique characteristics of the internet and its transformative impact on everyday life,” according to the Justice Department’s press release.

The second, meanwhile, calls for greater disabled access in internet-based 9-11 call centers. According to the press release, “The NG 9-1-1 ANPRM seeks information on how the centers may be able to provide direct access to 9-1-1 for individuals with disabilities as they implement new communication technologies.”

The other two proposals deal with closed captioning in movie theatres and disabled accessible furniture.

Continue Reading

Digital Inclusion

Senators Reintroduce Bipartisan Digital Equity Act

Sen. Murray re-introduces bi-partisan that would provide grants to states pushing for digital equity.

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on

Patty Murray, D-Washington

WASHINGTON, August 3, 2010 –The Obama administration has made the expansion of telecommunications services to disabled people a top priority. The decision to release these proposals coincides with the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which the administration sees as an urgent piece of legislation for a time when technology is growing. The proposals may draw fire from businesses on the grounds of excessive cost.

Of the four proposals involved, two directly implicate the telecommunications industry. The first, simply titled “Web Accessibility,” seeks comment on how the Justice Department “can develop a workable framework for website access that provides individuals with disabilities access to the critical information, programs, and services provided on the web, while respecting the unique characteristics of the internet and its transformative impact on everyday life,” according to the Justice Department’s press release.

The second, meanwhile, calls for greater disabled access in internet-based 9-11 call centers. According to the press release, “The NG 9-1-1 ANPRM seeks information on how the centers may be able to provide direct access to 9-1-1 for individuals with disabilities as they implement new communication technologies.”

The other two proposals deal with closed captioning in movie theatres and disabled accessible furniture.

Continue Reading

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