Connect with us

Big Tech

Report: Content Providers Sending Nastygrams to Time Warner Cable To Stop iPad Streaming

Time Warner Cable is receiving cease-and-desist letters for allowing its customers to access television programming through their iPads.

Published

on

Time Warner Cable is receiving cease-and-desist letters for allowing its customers to access television programming through their iPads, according to the online business, tech and finance site Business Insider.

The publication credits an anonymous industry source for the information.

Time Warner Cable’s free iPad app, which allows its existing customers to access some of their channels through the iPad within the confines of their homes, launched last Tuesday with 32 channels.

The app was so popular that it became the most downloaded program on iTunes on its launch day, March 15. But the popularity also caused the system to crash, which reduced the channel line-up to 15.

That’s the reason Time Warner gave for removing some of the channels. The company says that it plans to restore the missing channels and add more as quickly as possible.

At least one content owner has objected to Time Warner’s move.

Scripps Networks Interactive released a statement last week that said that it “has not granted iPad video streaming rights to any distributor and is actively addressing any misunderstandings on this issue.”

Trade industry publication Ad Age quotes a Time Warner Cable spokesman saying that the company believes it has the rights to move forward with the application.

Channel line-ups are negotiated between networks, content owners and cable companies, so it appears to be a disagreement between the two sides as to what existing contracts allow.

As CNET notes, Comcast offers its customers the free Xfinity TV iPad app, and other companies offer similar programs.

And Sling Media offers an app that allows access to programming from anywhere on iPads.

Perhaps the problem is that the programmers have their own iPad plans, and “surprises” from their cable partners might impact their own offerings on tablets.

Scripps, for example, already offers “Home and Garden TV to Go” as a downloadable app on iTunes.

It’s the kind of media industry rights dispute worth keeping tabs on since the lines that distinguish “streaming” on computers versus access through television seem destined to become ever fuzzier as cloud computing grows in popularity.

Broadband Breakfast is a decade-old news organization based in Washington that is building a community of interest around broadband policy and internet technology, with a particular focus on better broadband infrastructure, the politics of privacy and the regulation of social media. Learn more about Broadband Breakfast.

Section 230

Head of Big Tech Lobby Group Says Repealing Section 230 Unconstitutional

CTA CEO said abolishing intermediary liability protections violates private industry protections against government interference.

Published

on

Gary Shapiro, CEO of the Consumer Technology Association

Time Warner Cable is receiving cease-and-desist letters for allowing its customers to access television programming through their iPads, according to the online business, tech and finance site Business Insider.

The publication credits an anonymous industry source for the information.

Time Warner Cable’s free iPad app, which allows its existing customers to access some of their channels through the iPad within the confines of their homes, launched last Tuesday with 32 channels.

The app was so popular that it became the most downloaded program on iTunes on its launch day, March 15. But the popularity also caused the system to crash, which reduced the channel line-up to 15.

That’s the reason Time Warner gave for removing some of the channels. The company says that it plans to restore the missing channels and add more as quickly as possible.

At least one content owner has objected to Time Warner’s move.

Scripps Networks Interactive released a statement last week that said that it “has not granted iPad video streaming rights to any distributor and is actively addressing any misunderstandings on this issue.”

Trade industry publication Ad Age quotes a Time Warner Cable spokesman saying that the company believes it has the rights to move forward with the application.

Channel line-ups are negotiated between networks, content owners and cable companies, so it appears to be a disagreement between the two sides as to what existing contracts allow.

As CNET notes, Comcast offers its customers the free Xfinity TV iPad app, and other companies offer similar programs.

And Sling Media offers an app that allows access to programming from anywhere on iPads.

Perhaps the problem is that the programmers have their own iPad plans, and “surprises” from their cable partners might impact their own offerings on tablets.

Scripps, for example, already offers “Home and Garden TV to Go” as a downloadable app on iTunes.

It’s the kind of media industry rights dispute worth keeping tabs on since the lines that distinguish “streaming” on computers versus access through television seem destined to become ever fuzzier as cloud computing grows in popularity.

Continue Reading

Big Tech

Big Tech Must Take More Hands-Off Approach to Content to Build Trust, Expert Says 

Expert warns Big Tech must adopt hands-off approach to regain public trust.

Published

on

Katherine Maher, former Wikimedia CEO

Time Warner Cable is receiving cease-and-desist letters for allowing its customers to access television programming through their iPads, according to the online business, tech and finance site Business Insider.

The publication credits an anonymous industry source for the information.

Time Warner Cable’s free iPad app, which allows its existing customers to access some of their channels through the iPad within the confines of their homes, launched last Tuesday with 32 channels.

The app was so popular that it became the most downloaded program on iTunes on its launch day, March 15. But the popularity also caused the system to crash, which reduced the channel line-up to 15.

That’s the reason Time Warner gave for removing some of the channels. The company says that it plans to restore the missing channels and add more as quickly as possible.

At least one content owner has objected to Time Warner’s move.

Scripps Networks Interactive released a statement last week that said that it “has not granted iPad video streaming rights to any distributor and is actively addressing any misunderstandings on this issue.”

Trade industry publication Ad Age quotes a Time Warner Cable spokesman saying that the company believes it has the rights to move forward with the application.

Channel line-ups are negotiated between networks, content owners and cable companies, so it appears to be a disagreement between the two sides as to what existing contracts allow.

As CNET notes, Comcast offers its customers the free Xfinity TV iPad app, and other companies offer similar programs.

And Sling Media offers an app that allows access to programming from anywhere on iPads.

Perhaps the problem is that the programmers have their own iPad plans, and “surprises” from their cable partners might impact their own offerings on tablets.

Scripps, for example, already offers “Home and Garden TV to Go” as a downloadable app on iTunes.

It’s the kind of media industry rights dispute worth keeping tabs on since the lines that distinguish “streaming” on computers versus access through television seem destined to become ever fuzzier as cloud computing grows in popularity.

Continue Reading

Antitrust

Experts Say Congress’s New Antitrust Package is Philosophically Flawed and Politically Motivated

Antitrust and technology experts say that Congress’s new antitrust package is legally flawed and politically motivated.

Published

on

Pool photo of Lina Khan from April 2021 by Graeme Jennings

Time Warner Cable is receiving cease-and-desist letters for allowing its customers to access television programming through their iPads, according to the online business, tech and finance site Business Insider.

The publication credits an anonymous industry source for the information.

Time Warner Cable’s free iPad app, which allows its existing customers to access some of their channels through the iPad within the confines of their homes, launched last Tuesday with 32 channels.

The app was so popular that it became the most downloaded program on iTunes on its launch day, March 15. But the popularity also caused the system to crash, which reduced the channel line-up to 15.

That’s the reason Time Warner gave for removing some of the channels. The company says that it plans to restore the missing channels and add more as quickly as possible.

At least one content owner has objected to Time Warner’s move.

Scripps Networks Interactive released a statement last week that said that it “has not granted iPad video streaming rights to any distributor and is actively addressing any misunderstandings on this issue.”

Trade industry publication Ad Age quotes a Time Warner Cable spokesman saying that the company believes it has the rights to move forward with the application.

Channel line-ups are negotiated between networks, content owners and cable companies, so it appears to be a disagreement between the two sides as to what existing contracts allow.

As CNET notes, Comcast offers its customers the free Xfinity TV iPad app, and other companies offer similar programs.

And Sling Media offers an app that allows access to programming from anywhere on iPads.

Perhaps the problem is that the programmers have their own iPad plans, and “surprises” from their cable partners might impact their own offerings on tablets.

Scripps, for example, already offers “Home and Garden TV to Go” as a downloadable app on iTunes.

It’s the kind of media industry rights dispute worth keeping tabs on since the lines that distinguish “streaming” on computers versus access through television seem destined to become ever fuzzier as cloud computing grows in popularity.

Continue Reading

Recent

Signup for Broadband Breakfast

Get twice-weekly Breakfast Media news alerts.
* = required field

 

Trending