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Minow and Genachowski Discuss Spectrum and the Internet

WASHINGTON May 10, 2011 -To commemorate the 50th anniversary of former Federal Communications Commission Chairman, Newton Minow’s famous speech in which he called television a “vast wasteland,” the National Press Club and the George Washington University Global Media Institute gathered current FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and Minow to discuss the current state of the commission and media.

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WASHINGTON May 10, 2011 -To commemorate the 50th anniversary of former Federal Communications Commission Chairman, Newton Minow’s famous speech in which he called television a “vast wasteland,” the National Press Club and the George Washington University Global Media Institute gathered current FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and Minow to discuss the current state of the commission and media.

Minow called the work of the current FCC considerably more complex and difficult than that of the organization he led in the early 1960s.

“When I was chair we got our television through the air and the phone through the wires, now it’s the total opposite. But we have considerably more options than we used to have,” said Minow. “It doesn’t matter what your interest is, you can find a channel to support it on television and even more is on the internet. Even with all the choices we have out there for content we must keep the Internet free.”

Minow also called spectrum a vital resource that must be used for the public good.

“I pushed the broadcasters to create education programming which they weren’t doing because it was necessary programming,” he said.

Genachowski compared this push for educational programming to the current push to use broadcast spectrum to expand mobile broadband.

“I agree that we must use the spectrum we have in a responsible manner for the good of the public,” said Genachowski. “This is why we must expand our mobile broadband options, it will bring access to a larger group of people.”

Rahul Gaitonde has been writing for BroadbandBreakfast.com since the fall of 2009, and in May of 2010 he became Deputy Editor. He was a fellow at George Mason University’s Long Term Governance Project, a researcher at the International Center for Applied Studies in Information Technology and worked at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration. He holds a Masters of Public Policy from George Mason University, where his research focused on the economic and social benefits of broadband expansion. He has written extensively about Universal Service Fund reform, the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program and the Broadband Data Improvement Act

5G

FCC Commissioner Carr Discusses Benefits Of “Light Touch” Regulation And Open RAN

Carr credited the U.S.’s success in telecom to policies that were implemented by the FCC under the Trump administration.

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FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr

WASHINGTON May 10, 2011 -To commemorate the 50th anniversary of former Federal Communications Commission Chairman, Newton Minow’s famous speech in which he called television a “vast wasteland,” the National Press Club and the George Washington University Global Media Institute gathered current FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and Minow to discuss the current state of the commission and media.

Minow called the work of the current FCC considerably more complex and difficult than that of the organization he led in the early 1960s.

“When I was chair we got our television through the air and the phone through the wires, now it’s the total opposite. But we have considerably more options than we used to have,” said Minow. “It doesn’t matter what your interest is, you can find a channel to support it on television and even more is on the internet. Even with all the choices we have out there for content we must keep the Internet free.”

Minow also called spectrum a vital resource that must be used for the public good.

“I pushed the broadcasters to create education programming which they weren’t doing because it was necessary programming,” he said.

Genachowski compared this push for educational programming to the current push to use broadcast spectrum to expand mobile broadband.

“I agree that we must use the spectrum we have in a responsible manner for the good of the public,” said Genachowski. “This is why we must expand our mobile broadband options, it will bring access to a larger group of people.”

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Education

FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel Unveils Proposed Rules for Emergency Connectivity Fund

Acting FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel on Friday released rules for the Emergency Connectivity Fund, answering many questions about the program.

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Photo of Jessica Rosenworcel from the FCC

WASHINGTON May 10, 2011 -To commemorate the 50th anniversary of former Federal Communications Commission Chairman, Newton Minow’s famous speech in which he called television a “vast wasteland,” the National Press Club and the George Washington University Global Media Institute gathered current FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and Minow to discuss the current state of the commission and media.

Minow called the work of the current FCC considerably more complex and difficult than that of the organization he led in the early 1960s.

“When I was chair we got our television through the air and the phone through the wires, now it’s the total opposite. But we have considerably more options than we used to have,” said Minow. “It doesn’t matter what your interest is, you can find a channel to support it on television and even more is on the internet. Even with all the choices we have out there for content we must keep the Internet free.”

Minow also called spectrum a vital resource that must be used for the public good.

“I pushed the broadcasters to create education programming which they weren’t doing because it was necessary programming,” he said.

Genachowski compared this push for educational programming to the current push to use broadcast spectrum to expand mobile broadband.

“I agree that we must use the spectrum we have in a responsible manner for the good of the public,” said Genachowski. “This is why we must expand our mobile broadband options, it will bring access to a larger group of people.”

Continue Reading

FCC

Rosenworcel Says Anti-Muni Network Legislation Unfair, Hopes States Change Their Tune

FCC acting chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel said she hopes state legislatures change stance on muni builds.

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WASHINGTON May 10, 2011 -To commemorate the 50th anniversary of former Federal Communications Commission Chairman, Newton Minow’s famous speech in which he called television a “vast wasteland,” the National Press Club and the George Washington University Global Media Institute gathered current FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski and Minow to discuss the current state of the commission and media.

Minow called the work of the current FCC considerably more complex and difficult than that of the organization he led in the early 1960s.

“When I was chair we got our television through the air and the phone through the wires, now it’s the total opposite. But we have considerably more options than we used to have,” said Minow. “It doesn’t matter what your interest is, you can find a channel to support it on television and even more is on the internet. Even with all the choices we have out there for content we must keep the Internet free.”

Minow also called spectrum a vital resource that must be used for the public good.

“I pushed the broadcasters to create education programming which they weren’t doing because it was necessary programming,” he said.

Genachowski compared this push for educational programming to the current push to use broadcast spectrum to expand mobile broadband.

“I agree that we must use the spectrum we have in a responsible manner for the good of the public,” said Genachowski. “This is why we must expand our mobile broadband options, it will bring access to a larger group of people.”

Continue Reading

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