Connect with us

Broadband's Impact

Audi of America Joins Panel on ‘Smart Cars, the Consumer Experience and Broadband’

Published

on

WASHINGTON, Thursday March 14th, 2013 – The broadband policy news and events service BroadbandBreakfast.com will hold its March 2013 Broadband Breakfast Club event:

“Smart Cars, the Consumer Experience and Broadband” on Tuesday, March 19th, 2013 at Clyde’s of Gallery Place, 707 7th St. NW, Washington, DC 20001 from 8 am – 10 am.

Details and Registration are available at:

http://broadbandbreakfast.eventbrite.com

American and Continental breakfasts are included. The program begins shortly after 8:30 a.m. Tickets to the event are $45.00 plus a small online fee.

Registration is available at http://broadbandbreakfast.eventbrite.com

The Broadband Breakfast Club is sponsored by Comcast, Google and US Telecom.

Panel:

Steven Bayless, Senior Director of Telecommunications and Telematics, Intelligent Transportation Society of America (ITS America)

Stephen Bayless is responsible for providing guidance to ITS America’s Board of Directors and senior staff on matters involving new technologies, wireless services and evolving automotive platforms, intelligent transportation infrastructure, operations and customer services. Steven previously served as staff advisor and Presidential Management Fellow in the Secretary of Transportation’s policy office at US DOT headquarters. Steven had cabinet-level lead in policy related to research and development, spectrum management and telecommunications policy. As a detailee to the White House, he assisted in formulation of several presidential directives on aerospace policy, focusing in particular on satellite navigation. He also advised the State Department and the Federal Aviation Administration in negotiations on space and aviation cooperation with the European Union, the Russian Federation and Japan. In the surface transportation domain, Bayless supported secretarial policy initiatives regarding the reorientation of federal research and development, highway safety, and transportation infrastructure finance reform. Steven holds a specialized masters degree from the Fletcher School at Tufts University in International Security Studies and Business. His bachelor degree is in Economics and Foreign Affairs from the University of Virginia. 

Catherine McCullough, Vice President, DCI Group

Catherine McCullough is a government affairs consultant who works with industry-leading clients on matters before Congress and federal agencies. She is a life-long resident of the Washington, DC, area and has worked in politics and policy for over twenty years. Prior to joining DCI Group, she conceived and implemented successful lobby and public affairs strategies for clients with crucial issues in the telecommunications, tech, banking, consumer products, and healthcare industries. Ms. McCullough previously served as a Counsel for the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation when it was led by Senator Hollings and later when it was led by Senator Inouye. The Commerce Committee oversees and writes laws that regulate much of U.S. industry. There she worked on the subcommittees that oversaw the consumer product, auto, tech, tourism, sports and insurance industries. Her background in data privacy issues led her to a role as a negotiator on the US SAFE WEB Act, which became law in 2006, and the Committee’s identity theft prevention bill. Also during her time with the Committee, Ms. McCullough worked on many high-profile issues including post-Katrina oil and gas pricing, steroid use by U.S. Olympic and professional athletes, the “Do Not Call” list, and the Jack Abramoff investigation. Ms. McCullough is a contributor to blogs on politics and policy such as CommLawBlog. She is an attorney and also holds degrees in Journalism and Political Science.

Anupam Malhotra, Manager Connected Vehicles, Audi of America

Anupam Malhotra is Senior Manager Connected Vehicles for Audi of America, responsible for all the operations of the Audi connect® infotainment system and services and the formulation and execution of the company’s connected-vehicle strategy with Audi AG. “Pom” Malhotra joined Audi in mid-2010 on a contract basis as a subject-matter expert, but soon it became apparent that connectivity would become a crucial part of the technology proposition for the entire brand, and his position was formalized. He joined Audi initially from his role as head of enterprise quality for location-based services for General Motors’ pioneering OnStar brand. “This is an important aspect of Audi visionary thinking as well as a recognition that our customers are very in tune with these types of services,” Malhotra said. “We very much believe, and are pursuing, the idea that what consumers do at home and at play in terms of their information and entertainment lifestyles must be accommodated and enhanced by their experience in their Audi vehicle. Infotainment will become a core differentiator among luxury brands going forward; that will be a given.” Already, Malhotra said, Audi connect has become one of the top five reasons that customers are telling dealers they want to buy an Audi. And the company has provided a number of “industry firsts” in infotainment, including the first Google Earth feed of satellite imagery to a vehicle’s navigation system, the first system to provide Wi-Fi service to as many as eight devices in the same vehicle, and the use of Google Voice Local Search to facilitate the understanding and implementation of verbal commands by the vehicle’s infotainment system.

Jeff Stewart, Director – Public Policy, Wireless, AT&T External & Legislative Affairs

Jeff Stewart is responsible for developing AT&T’s public policy positions and providing policy guidance to AT&T’s business units on issues pertaining to wireless network management, net neutrality, and new applications and services. He also provides policy support and guidance to AT&T’s Emerging Devices Organization, which connects a broad range of new devices to wireless networks, including connected cars. Jeff worked in marketing and operations roles at AT&T before joining the Public Policy organization. Prior to joining AT&T, Jeff served on active duty in the Marine Corps. He continues to serve in the Marine Corps Reserve, currently as the commanding officer of an artillery battery in Chattanooga, TN. Jeff has a bachelor’s degree in History from the University of Chicago, and an MBA focused on technology innovation from Georgia Tech.

Moderator:

Russell Holly, Mobile Editor, Geek.com

Russell Holly focuses on anything with a touch screen. For the last five years, he’s focused on mobile and open source technologies as they apply to new computing environments and lifestyle integration. Russell’s coverage in the mobile field ranges from security to application development, with a strong focus on user oriented device control or BYOD situations.

The Broadband Breakfast Club series meets on the third Tuesday of each month (except for August and December).

The Broadband Breakfast Club schedule can be viewed at

http://broadbandbreakfastseries.eventbrite.com

Read our website for broadband news and event write-ups

http://www.broadbandbreakfast.com

Videos of our previous events are available at:

https://broadbandbreakfast.com/category/broadband-tv/

Background on BroadbandBreakfast.com

BroadbandBreakfast.com is in its fifth year of hosting monthly breakfast forums in Washington on broadband and related internet policy issues. These events are on the record, open to the public and consider a wide range of viewpoints. Our Broadband Breakfast Club meets on the third tuesday of every month (except for August and December).

Our elected official keynotes have included Representatives Zoe Lofgren (D-CA), John Conyers (D-MI), Diane Watson (D-CA), Joe Barton (R-TX) and the former Rep. Rick Boucher (D-VA).

Our agency and commission official keynotes have included Deputy Undersecretary for Agriculture Dallas Tonsager, Julius Genachowski, Chairman FCC; former RUS Administrator, Jonathan Adelstein, Julie Brill, Federal Trade Commissioner; Anna Gomez, Deputy Assistant Secretary NTIA.

Our moderated discussion panels are comprised of leaders from a wide variety of organizations including government, industry, law firms, academia, nonprofit, journalism and many others.

Our audiences are equally diverse.

For More Information Contact:

 Sylvia Syracuse

Director of Marketing and Events

BroadbandBreakfast.com

Sylvia@broadbandcensus.com

646-262-4630

Sylvia manages the Broadband Breakfast Club, on-the-record monthly discussion groups that meet on the THIRD Tuesday of each month. She has had a long career in non-profit development and administration, and has raised funds for technology and science education, and managed a project on health information exchange adopted by the State of New York. She understands community education and infrastructure needs for effective broadband access.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Digital Inclusion

Digital Inclusion Leaders a Critical Step to Closing Digital Divide: National League of Cities

The National League of Cities said government leaders need to have ‘multiple points of engagement’ with communities.

Published

on

Lena Geraghty, National League of Cities director of urban innovation

WASHINGTON, January 20, 2022 – To understand the digital divide, cities need to include digital equity leaders in their broadband needs assessment programs, the National League of Cities said at an event on community connectivity challenges Wednesday.

A broadband needs assessment would allow city leaders to explore the extent of the digital divide in their communities, said Lena Geraghty, the National League of Cities’ director of urban innovation.

“[A needs assessment] enable city leaders to dig into who’s being excluded, what’s currently available in your city, and what solutions city leaders can use” to close the digital divide, she said.

“The community is going to know best about where access exists, where gaps exist, and the needs that will make connectivity better,” Geraghty said. To get the best picture of a community’s need, stakeholders must find and include the community’s digital equity leaders in the data-gathering process, she added.

“These could be people that are knowledgeable about digital equity or people that are experiencing the digital divide,” she said. “Think really broadly about what it means to be a leader and the type of information these folks can bring to bear in solving the digital divide in your communities.”

Geraghty said it may be useful to formalize the leaders’ work by creating a broadband working group or ad hoc committee led by the city’s government. “Giving some roles and responsibilities can help everyone move in the same in direction, there’s agreement, and really clear goals and outcomes.”

Geraghty added that it’s important for government leaders to establish multiple points of engagement for the community. “It’s not enough to gather data or information from people once,” she said. “The state of access to the internet and devices is always changing,” so leaders should create multiple touch points for community input.

The National League of Cities released its Digital Equity Playbook for cities in December, walking readers through how they can promote digital equity in their cities. The playbook has a four-step process on how to get started with digital equity.

By walking readers through the process of connecting with the community, evaluating the connectivity landscape, gathering foundational information and reporting on findings, city leaders will be prepared to target broadband funding to unserved and underserved areas in their communities.

Continue Reading

Environment

FCC Commissioner Starks Says Commission Looking into Impact of Broadband, 5G on Environment

Starks sat down to discuss the promise of smart grid technology for the environment.

Published

on

FCC Commissioner Geoffrey Starks

WASHINGTON, January 19, 2022 – Former and current leaders within the Federal Communications Commission agreed Thursday that it is important to make sure the FCC’s broadband efforts support the nation’s goals for the environment.

On Thursday, during a Cooley law firm fireside chat event, Robert McDowell, a former FCC director, and current FCC Commissioner Geoffrey Starks discussed how broadband expansion and next-generation 5G mobile networks will affect the environment.

Starks said that the commission is currently focusing on answering that exact question and are evaluating the current attempts to protect the environment, as more money is expected from the federal government and as broadband infrastructure expands. That includes putting more fiber into the ground and erecting more cell towers, but also allowing for a broadband-enabled smart grid system that will make automated decisions on energy allocation.

Smart grid systems, for example, provide real-time monitoring of the energy used in the electrical system. These systems can help to reduce consumption and carbon emissions, Starks said, by rerouting excess power and addressing power outages instantaneously in the most efficient and environmentally friendly manner. The smart grid systems will monitor “broadband systems in the 900 MHz band,” said Starks.

Starks also noted the Senate’s “Strengthening Mobility and Revolutionizing Transportation” initiative, which would set apart $500 million for cities across America so they can begin working on ways to lower carbon emissions.

FCC also focused on digital discrimination

Starks said the commission is also focusing on “making sure that there is no digital discrimination on income level, race, ethnicity, religion, national origin,” and that it all comes down to funding and who needs the money.

He stated that the first step is to finalize the maps and data that have been collected so funding can be targeted to the areas and people that need it the most. Many have remarked that the $65 billion allocated to broadband from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act will not be divvied out until adequate maps are put in place.

Starks noted that broadband subsidy program Lifeline, although fundamental to some people’s lives, is significantly underutilized. Starks stated that participation rates hover around 20 percent, which led the FCC to explore other options while attempting to make Lifeline more effective. For example, the Emergency Broadband Benefit Program – which provides monthly broadband subsidies – has been replaced by the Affordable Connectivity Program, a long-term and revised edition of the pandemic-era program.

Starks and McDowell also stated their support for the confirmation by the Senate of Alan Davidson as the permanent head of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration and expressed that Davidson will be a key player in these efforts.

Continue Reading

Broadband's Impact

CES 2022: Public-Private Partnerships Key to Building Smart Cities, Tech leaders Say

Public-private partnerships will increase the community benefit of infrastructure projects, leaders at Qualcomm and Verizon said.

Published

on

Panelists on the “Smart Cities and Public-Private Partnerships” CES session on Friday.

LAS VEGAS, January 12, 2022––Telecommunications industry leaders said Friday at the Consumer Electronics Show that public-private partnerships will pave the way to realizing the future of smart cities.

Raymond Bauer, director of the domain specialist group that connects governments to Verizon’s telecommunications services, said the government needs private partners to improve its infrastructure efforts.

Referencing the recent passage of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, Bauer said governments should look forward to partnering with private technology companies to improve upcoming infrastructure projects.

“There’s a once in a lifetime opportunity from IIJA,” Bauer said. “We should find common ways to work in a way we haven’t in the past. There are certain goals and use cases to leverage the infrastructure we have,” he said.

The $1.2 trillion bipartisan legislation funds physical and digital infrastructure projects, including $65 billion for the expansion of broadband across the country.

Bauer said communities have a chance to monetize the services Verizon offers to communities if Verizon builds infrastructure for broadband access in underserved areas. “By bridging the digital divide, underserved communities get the services they need,” he added.

Ashok Tipirneni, head of smart cities and connected spaces at Qualcomm, said that cities should be thinking about how technology can improve much-needed infrastructure projects.

“Cities are growing faster than available utility,” he said, citing global issues of housing, water, and equity for vulnerable populations. “How do we ensure access for all citizens? And how can cities be in lock step with new technology, whatever it is?” he asked.

Qualcomm’s Smart Cities Accelerator Program delivers internet of things ecosystem products and services to member cities and local governments.

“New Orleans, Miami, and Los Angeles has local governments asking how they can do better,” he said. “They offer opportunities for partnerships that wouldn’t have been the case a few years ago.”

Continue Reading

Recent

Signup for Broadband Breakfast

Get twice-weekly Breakfast Media news alerts.
* = required field

Trending