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Register for the June Broadband Breakfast Club Event: ‘Advanced Energy, Smart Grid and Fiber to the Home: Using Advanced Energy to Jumpstart Fiber Builds’

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Washington, Wednesday, June 12th, 2013 –  BroadbandBreakfast.com will hold its June 2013 Broadband Breakfast Club event:

Advanced Energy, Smart Grid and Fiber to the Home: Using Advanced Energy to Jumpstart Fiber Builds” on Tuesday, June 18th, 2013 at Clyde’s of Gallery Place, 707 7th St. NW, Washington, DC 20001 from 8 am – 10 am.

Advanced Energy, or fully  integrated and optimized energy conservation, is predicted to be an opportunity greater than the internet economy to date. Fast, reliable broadband will be a key feature of advanced energy implementation and distribution through smart grid systems. Yet, while smart grid networks of various complexity exist, new networks are limited by the short supply of fiber build outs. The United States is 15 percent built out with Fiber to the Home. How can we get the remaining 85 percent built? This breakfast will explore the works of various organizations and collaboratives tackling these issues.

Panel

John Hewa, Vice President of Research, Engineering, and Technical Services

John leads NRECA’s Energy and Power Division, addressing technical aspects of regulatory issues facing electric cooperatives, and the Cooperative Research Network, working to identify and advocate for the use of beneficial technologies among our nation’s electric cooperatives.Prior to joining NRECA, John served as the General Manager of Talquin Electric Cooperative, Inc. a member-owned, electric cooperative headquartered in Quincy, Florida. Talquin Electric provides electric distribution services to over 50,000 homes and businesses in four counties of north Florida, including areas surrounding Florida’s capital city, Tallahassee. John was also General Manager of Talquin Water and Wastewater, Inc, a non-profit, Florida corporation providing water and wastewater utility services. Previous to his tenure at Talquin, John served as the utilities manager for the City of Manassas, Virginia, where he was responsible for overseeing the delivery of Water, Wastewater, Electric and Telecommunication services. John has a wealth of leadership and technical experience in the utility industry, focusing on utility management, energy delivery systems, telecommunications and innovative Smart Grid end-use solutions. Throughout his career, John has actively served on a variety of committees for NRECA and the American Public Power Association (APPA). John has served as Chairman of NRECA’s Management Issues Committee and as a Board Director for the Florida Electric Cooperative Association. While in Florida, John served on the Board of Directors of Seminole Electric Cooperative, a Generation and Transmission cooperative, headquartered in Tampa, Florida delivering electricity to 1.6 million Floridians. John holds a Bachelor degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Tennessee and Masters degree in Engineering Management from the University of Tennessee. He is a licensed Professional Engineer.

C. David Hudgins, Director of Member and External Relations, Old Dominion Electric Cooperative 

Old Dominion is a generation and transmission cooperative that supplies the electricity needs of twelve member electric distribution cooperatives that serve over 500,000 consumers in Virginia, Delaware and Maryland. In his position, Hudgins works with these member cooperatives and local, regional and state governmental agencies to identify and attract businesses to locate in the predominantly rural areas served by these cooperatives. Prior to joining Old Dominion in 1996, Hudgins served as the Director of Economic Development for Spotsylvania County, Virginia from 1991-1996. He began his career in manufacturing with E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Company where we held various positions. Hudgins has served on a wide range of educational, civic and community organizations, including the Metropolitan Richmond Economic Development Council, the Richmond chapter of the American Red Cross, the Henrico County Industrial Development Authority, the Henrico East Business Council, the Greater Richmond Chamber of Commerce, the Economic Development Committee of the Virginia Chamber of Commerce and the Virginia General Assembly’s Joint Committee on Technology and Science. Most recently, Hudgins was instrumental in the conception and establishment of the Mid-Atlantic Broadband Cooperative and serves as vice-chairman of the Cooperative’s board of directors. A native of Gwynns Island, Mathews County, Virginia, Hudgins earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration and Management at Virginia Commonwealth University.

James H. Salter, Chief Executive Officer, Atlantic Engineering Group

James Salter is founder and President of Atlantic Engineering Group, a design & build firm specializing in Fiber to the Home projects, particularly for electric utilities. Since its formation in 1996, Atlantic Engineering Group has been involved in 35 City Wide FTTH projects, representing 1,000,000 homes passed, and included 14 project having a significant Smart Grid component as part of the business case. Prior to founding AEG, and after graduating from Georgia Tech with an Electrical Engineering degree, Mr. Salter spent 15 years in the electric utility business at American Electric Power, Walton EMC and the City of Monroe Georgia. Mr. Salter is a former Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Fiber to the Home (FTTH) Council (www.ftthcouncil.org) an industry trade group whose mission is to promote fiber to the home as the ultimate access technology.

Malcolm D. Woolf, Senior Vice-President, Policy & Government Affairs, Advanced Energy Economy

Malcolm works to influence public policy, foster advanced energy innovation and business growth, and provide a unified voice for all segments of the advanced energy industry. Before joined AEE, Malcolm served as a Cabinet-level official with Governor Martin O’Malley. As head of the Maryland Energy Administration from 2007-2012, he helped enact and implement one of the most ambitious sets of energy goals in the nation, including the EmPOWER Maryland Act seeking a 15% reduction in peak demand and overall electricity consumption, a 20% renewable standard, and a 25% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. Woolf was the chair of the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), has testified before Congress on several occasions, and is frequently featured in national media. He was recently appointed by Secretary Chu to serve on the U.S. Department of Energy’s State Energy Advisory Board. Woolf previously served as the director of the National Governors Association’s Natural Resources Committee and counsel to the U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. He also was a senior attorney with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and an associate with the law firms of Winston & Strawn and Piper & Marbury L.L.P. Woolf received his B.A. magna cum laude from Tufts University. He earned his law degree, as well as a Masters of Public Administration and Public Policy, from the University of Virginia.

Additional speakers have been invited

Details and Registration are available at:

http://broadbandbreakfast.eventbrite.com

American and Continental breakfasts are included. The program begins shortly after 8:30 a.m. Tickets to the event are $45.00 plus a small online fee.

The Broadband Breakfast Club is sponsored by Comcast, Google and US Telecom.

The Broadband Breakfast Club series meets on the third Tuesday of each month (except for August and December).

The upcoming event schedule can be viewed at

http://broadbandbreakfastseries.eventbrite.com

Read our website for broadband news and event write-ups

http://www.broadbandbreakfast.com

Videos of our previous events are available at:

https://broadbandbreakfast.com/category/broadband-tv/

Background on BroadbandBreakfast.com

BroadbandBreakfast.com is in its fifth year of hosting monthly breakfast forums in Washington on broadband policy and related subjects. These events are on the record, open to the public and consider a wide range of viewpoints. Our Broadband Breakfast Club meets on the third tuesday of every month (except for August and December).

Our elected official keynotes have included Representatives Zoe Lofgren (D-CA), John Conyers (D-MI), Diane Watson (D-CA), James Clyburn (D-SC), Joe Barton (R-TX) and the former Rep. Rick Boucher (D-VA).

Our agency and commission official keynotes have included Deputy Undersecretary for Agriculture Dallas Tonsager, Julius Genachowski, Chairman FCC; former RUS Administrator, Jonathan Adelstein, Julie Brill, Federal Trade Commissioner; Anna Gomez, Deputy Assistant Secretary NTIA, and former FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski.

Our moderated discussion panels are comprised of leaders from a wide variety of organizations including government, industry, law firms, academia, nonprofit, journalism and many others. Our audiences are equally diverse.

For More Information Contact:

Sylvia Syracuse
Director of Marketing and Events
BroadbandBreakfast.com
Sylvia@broadbandcensus.com
646-262-4630

Sylvia manages the Broadband Breakfast Club, on-the-record monthly discussion groups that meet on the THIRD Tuesday of each month. She has had a long career in non-profit development and administration, and has raised funds for technology and science education, and managed a project on health information exchange adopted by the State of New York. She understands community education and infrastructure needs for effective broadband access.

Advanced Energy

Last-Mile Delivery and Electric Vehicles: Why Congress Should Support Logistics in the Next Infrastructure Bill

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February 3, 2021 – The problem with electric vehicles has always been that they don’t have enough battery to achieve a decent driving range at a reasonable cost, a group of experts said on a panel discussion on January 26 led by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

That’s why electric cars have been eyed as a solution for improving deliveries by drivers, yet guaranteeing battery efficiency is still in the future.

Additional alternative energy vehicle options such as fuel cell-powered may serve as a complement to electric vehicles, said Amy Adams, vice president over fuel cell and hydrogen technologies at Cummins Inc. Fuel cell-powered cars may be better equipped for larger vehicles that need to travel longer distances, especially in rural areas, she said.

Despite the potential electric or fuel cell-powered cars bring, they do have drawbacks. For example, a delivery driver who drives an average of 65 miles per day makes up to 200 stops or more per day. That’s equal to 1,000 foot motions on the brakes, and that can deteriorate knee health and decrease efficiency.

Electric vehicles for delivery drivers should incorporate regenerative braking systems to capture all that lost energy for each stop made, said John Lindsey, head of electric vehicle sales for Schneider Electric North America.

But electric and fuel cell-powered cars haven’t been readily integrated into the U.S. economy compared to other countries like in Europe. That’s why delivery companies need to balance neighborhood safety with delivery driver safety, said Duane Hughes, CEO of Workhouse Group. Hughes called for the integration of lane departure and lane collision warning systems for delivery drivers to protect both themselves and others around them.

To combat additional costs from incorporating these ideas, the experts supported a standardized, universal-like nozzle fill-up system for electric and fuel cell-powered cars to reduce customization costs. Reducing the overall core weight of vehicles would also improve battery efficiency.

And incentives and grant programs are needed from the federal government to jumpstart more research and development to achieve this, said Thomas Jensen, a senior government relations executive at UPS.

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Advanced Energy

White House Launches ‘Smart City’ Initiative That Links Broadband Connectivity to Urban Solutions

WASHINGTON, September 16, 2015 – A movement to make cities “smart” by using the power of broadband and information technology processing power is reaching critical mass, with the White House on Monday announcing a comprehensive initiative to support municipal efforts.

Coinciding with the Smart Cities Week conference here this week, the White House released a 4,000-word summary of more than $160 million in federal research investments, leveraging more than 25 technology collaborations with local communities.

The goal of these efforts? Tackling such key challenges, in the words of the White House, as “reducing traffic congestion, fighting crime, fostering economic growth, managing the effects of a changing climate, and improving the delivery of city services.”

“Advances in science and technology have the potential to accelerate these efforts,” read the White House statement. “An emerging community of civic leaders, data scientists, technologists, and companies are joining forces to build ‘Smart Cities’ – communities that are building an infrastructure to continuously improve the collection, aggregation, and use of data to improve the life of their residents – by harnessing the growing data revolution, low-cost sensors, and research collaborations, and doing so securely to protect safety and privacy.”

The launch of White House Smart Cities Initiative

[More…]

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WASHINGTON, September 16, 2015 – A movement to make cities “smart” by using the power of broadband and information technology processing power is reaching critical mass, with the White House on Monday announcing a comprehensive initiative to support municipal efforts.

Coinciding with the Smart Cities Week conference here this week, the White House released a 4,000-word summary of more than $160 million in federal research investments, leveraging more than 25 technology collaborations with local communities.

The goal of these efforts? Tackling such key challenges, in the words of the White House, as “reducing traffic congestion, fighting crime, fostering economic growth, managing the effects of a changing climate, and improving the delivery of city services.”

“Advances in science and technology have the potential to accelerate these efforts,” read the White House statement. “An emerging community of civic leaders, data scientists, technologists, and companies are joining forces to build ‘Smart Cities’ – communities that are building an infrastructure to continuously improve the collection, aggregation, and use of data to improve the life of their residents – by harnessing the growing data revolution, low-cost sensors, and research collaborations, and doing so securely to protect safety and privacy.”

The launch of White House Smart Cities Initiative

The launch of White House Smart Cities Initiative

None of these Smart City innovations would be possible without the connectivity enabled by fiber-optic networks. These new opportunities for city services may prove to be the most effective driver of Gigabit Networks. As I wrote in an article last December on “The Year of Community and Municipal Gigabit Broadband,” this is “a world in which cities and municipalities are playing the leadership role.”

The White House Weighs In

Among the most significant facets of the administration’s announcement include:

  • More than $45 million in grants and investment for Smart City research and infrastructure by the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Standards and Technology.
  • Nearly $70 million in new spending for technologies to promote solutions in public safety, energy, climate preparedness, transportation and health by federal agencies.
  • More than 20 cities participating in multi-party efforts “that will help city leaders effectively collaboration with universities and industry.”

In a separate statement on the White House web site, Dan Correa, administration senior adviser for innovation policy, wrote:

By coordinating adjacent traffic signals to optimize local traffic throughput, a pilot project in Pittsburgh has reduced commuting travel times by more than 25 percent, on average. In Louisville, the city is using data gathered from sensor-equipped asthma inhalers to understand the connection between asthma “hotspots” and air quality levels and other environmental factors in order to inform policymaking and community-level interventions.

One new aspect of the Obama Administration’s Smart Cities Initiative will be a focus on creating new technological test beds for “Internet of Things” applications.

Another will  be collaboration with the civic tech movement, the “growing community of individuals, entrepreneurs, and nonprofits interested in harnessing [information technology] to tackle local problems and work directly with city governments.”

In a manner similar to the way open source technology allows new innovators to build upon others’ software, this “open data” movement allows entities outside of government to make use of government data streams in real time.

Additionally, the White House said, the government plans to use other federal agency research — from sensor networks to broadband infrastructure — in its Smart City efforts, and to pursue international collaboration, particularly research aimed at climate and resource demand.

The agency also announced the release of a new framework for coordinating actions by a range of federal agencies, and a science and technologies priorities memo that will impact the administration’s pending 2017 budget proposal.

Actions by Cities and the Private Sector

In addition to White House and federal agency developments, more than 20 city-university collaborations are taking part in what is being called the MetroLab Network.

These collaborations include:

•        Atlanta, with Georgia State University and Georgia Tech

•        Boston, with Boston Area Research Initiative

•        Chicago, with the University of Chicago

•        Cuyahoga County, with Case Western University

•        Dallas, with Texas Research Alliance

•        Detroit, with Wayne State University

•        Houston, with Rice University

•        Madison, with University of Wisconsin-Madison

•        Memphis, with University of Memphis

•        Minneapolis & St. Paul, with University of Minnesota

•        Montgomery County, with University of Maryland and Universities at Shady Grove

•        New York City, with New York University

•        Philadelphia, with Drexel University and University of Pennsylvania

•        Pittsburgh, with Carnegie Mellon University

•        Portland, with Portland State University

•        Providence, with Brown University, College Unbound, and Rhode Island School of Design

•        San Diego, with University of California San Diego

•        San Jose, with San Jose State University

•        Seattle, with University of Washington

•        South Bend, with University of Notre Dame

•        Washington, DC, with Howard University, Georgetown University, and George Washington University

And among the more than 60 Smart City pilots taking place over the next year include:

  • City Digital, a Chicago-based consortium, focusing on urban infrastructure challenges
  • Dallas Innovation Alliance effort to enhance infrastructure, mobility and connected living
  • An IBM deployment of a Smarter Cities Challenge team in Detroit for cost-efficient removal and recycling of debris from abandoned and neglected properties
  • The National League of Cities and 25 local government and the 2015 winners of its Multi-City Innovation Campaign: The Bluelight mobile 911 application, and Ride, a collaborative tool for analyzing bicycling data.
  • New York City’s new neighborhood innovation labs that will leverage Mayor Bill DeBlasio’s efforts to expand a free public WiFi network throughout the city.

Drew Clark is the Chairman of the Broadband Breakfast Club. He tracks the development of Gigabit Networks, broadband usage, the universal service fund and wireless policy @BroadbandCensus. He is also Of Counsel with the firm of Best Best & Krieger LLP, with offices in California and Washington, DC. He works with cities, special districts and private companies on planning, financing and coordinating efforts of the many partners necessary to construct broadband infrastructure and deploy “Smart City” applications. You can find him on LinkedIN and Twitter. The articles and posts on BroadbandBreakfast.com and affiliated social media are not legal advice or legal services, do not constitute the creation of an attorney-client privilege, and represent the views of their respective authors.

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Advanced Energy

At National Town Meeting on Smart Grid, Leaders Tout Role of ‘Microgrids’ in Energy Efficiency Projects

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WASHINGTON, July 12, 2013 – Several leaders of microgrid initiatives from around the country spoke on the successes of their projects at the National Town Meeting on Demand Response and Smart Grid on Thursday.

First, Tom Vosburg, Policy and Project Manager for Fort Collins Utilities Light and Power Operation, discussed the Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration project in Fort Collins, Colorado. The program, which received over $10 million in funding from the Department of Energy and local entities, employed a number of strategies to increase energy efficiency.

Microgrids, or modern, small-scale versions of the centralized electricity system are one such strategy.

Vosburg and his organization worked specifically to reduce peak loads by 20 to 30 percent. Peak loads at one of the feeders were reduced by 25 percent, meeting this goal.

John Bradley, Associate Vice President of Energy and Technical Services at New York University also presented his work on the university’s microgrid. NYU utilizes cogeneration to power about 40 buildings on the campus, although they do rely on other connections as a backup.

Many buildings on the campus also employ wireless occupancy-based sensors and controls that adjust power usage based on occupants as well as the state of the building itself. These controls have resulted in a 30 percent reduction in power usage, Bradley said.

Finally, Will Agate, Senior Vice President of the Navy Yard Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation, described the progress toward establishing a microgrid in the Navy Yard in Philadelphia. His organization has worked with a number of corporations and other groups to develop a plan that focuses on smart grid infrastructure development, a sustainable business plan, customer efficiency, demand reduction, innovative technology and a small carbon footprint.

Agate also spoke on why microgrids are important to advancing smart grid technology. An important part of such programs is their grass roots nature, which he believes has been a model for success in a variety of areas.

“This is a way that customers in the field can decide what they want and what they are going to ask service providers to provide for them,” Agate said.

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