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Experts Discuss Future of Smart Grids, Advanced Meters and the Need for Standards

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WASHINGTON, July 12, 2013 – A panel discussion held Wednesday afternoon addressed advances in smart grid technology as well as the challenge ahead for the future, at the 10th annual National Town Meeting on Demand Response and Smart Grid.

Jason Wilson, Senior Vice President of Business Management and Product Development for On-Ramp Wireless, said that much of the current smart grid growth is not necessarily a result of new technology but rather more affordable technology, allowing utility companies to pursue the creation of smart grids.

This increasing utilization of smart grid technology has led to improved service from utility companies. While they still perform the same functions, they are able to perform those functions much more efficiently and reliably, as Robert Ethier, Vice President of Market Developments for ISO New England, noted.

The panel also discussed the role of smart meters in the development of smart grid technology. A poll of the audience showed that the majority felt that smart meters were over emphasized. The panelists agreed that smart grid technology went far beyond simply utilizing smart meters, but Chris King, Global Chief Regulatory Officer for Siemens Smart Grid claimed that they are a necessary starting point as a means of gathering crucial data.

“[The smart meter] is not going to get you all the way there, but you can’t start without it, Mike Carlson, General Manager for Software Solutions at General Electric Digital Energy, said.

The need for standards was also a major subject of debate among the panelists. Carlson discussed both benefits and disadvantages to the imposition of strict standards. Although they could prevent needless losses, excessive standards may hinder pioneers from innovating, he noted.

Consequently, King praised the National Institute of Standards and Technology for their recommendations. NIST released a number of standards that have applied successfully within the industry without applying any strict mandates.

The panelists also addressed security and privacy concerns associated with smart grid data collection. Kara Rinaldi, Executive Director of the National Home Performance Council, dismissed as overblown and irrational concerns that some people have about others knowing when they are home based on energy use, since potential thieves are highly unlikely to have access to this information.

Rinaldi also noted that most companies in the industry are highly committed to security and must have such a commitment to be successful.

“If you can’t handle security and privacy, you shouldn’t be in this business,” she said.

Additionally, King argued that the benefits from such data collection are far too great to ignore. The more immediate and specific feedback consumers receive about their energy usage, the more likely they are to adjust their use, he noted.

Josh Evans is a political science major at Grove City College. He is originally from Dover, Florida. An intern at the National Journalism Center in the summer of 2013, he is a Reporter for Broadband Census News and the News Editor for The Collegian at Grove City College.

Advanced Energy

Last-Mile Delivery and Electric Vehicles: Why Congress Should Support Logistics in the Next Infrastructure Bill

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WASHINGTON, July 12, 2013 – A panel discussion held Wednesday afternoon addressed advances in smart grid technology as well as the challenge ahead for the future, at the 10th annual National Town Meeting on Demand Response and Smart Grid.

Jason Wilson, Senior Vice President of Business Management and Product Development for On-Ramp Wireless, said that much of the current smart grid growth is not necessarily a result of new technology but rather more affordable technology, allowing utility companies to pursue the creation of smart grids.

This increasing utilization of smart grid technology has led to improved service from utility companies. While they still perform the same functions, they are able to perform those functions much more efficiently and reliably, as Robert Ethier, Vice President of Market Developments for ISO New England, noted.

The panel also discussed the role of smart meters in the development of smart grid technology. A poll of the audience showed that the majority felt that smart meters were over emphasized. The panelists agreed that smart grid technology went far beyond simply utilizing smart meters, but Chris King, Global Chief Regulatory Officer for Siemens Smart Grid claimed that they are a necessary starting point as a means of gathering crucial data.

“[The smart meter] is not going to get you all the way there, but you can’t start without it, Mike Carlson, General Manager for Software Solutions at General Electric Digital Energy, said.

The need for standards was also a major subject of debate among the panelists. Carlson discussed both benefits and disadvantages to the imposition of strict standards. Although they could prevent needless losses, excessive standards may hinder pioneers from innovating, he noted.

Consequently, King praised the National Institute of Standards and Technology for their recommendations. NIST released a number of standards that have applied successfully within the industry without applying any strict mandates.

The panelists also addressed security and privacy concerns associated with smart grid data collection. Kara Rinaldi, Executive Director of the National Home Performance Council, dismissed as overblown and irrational concerns that some people have about others knowing when they are home based on energy use, since potential thieves are highly unlikely to have access to this information.

Rinaldi also noted that most companies in the industry are highly committed to security and must have such a commitment to be successful.

“If you can’t handle security and privacy, you shouldn’t be in this business,” she said.

Additionally, King argued that the benefits from such data collection are far too great to ignore. The more immediate and specific feedback consumers receive about their energy usage, the more likely they are to adjust their use, he noted.

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Advanced Energy

White House Launches ‘Smart City’ Initiative That Links Broadband Connectivity to Urban Solutions

WASHINGTON, September 16, 2015 – A movement to make cities “smart” by using the power of broadband and information technology processing power is reaching critical mass, with the White House on Monday announcing a comprehensive initiative to support municipal efforts.

Coinciding with the Smart Cities Week conference here this week, the White House released a 4,000-word summary of more than $160 million in federal research investments, leveraging more than 25 technology collaborations with local communities.

The goal of these efforts? Tackling such key challenges, in the words of the White House, as “reducing traffic congestion, fighting crime, fostering economic growth, managing the effects of a changing climate, and improving the delivery of city services.”

“Advances in science and technology have the potential to accelerate these efforts,” read the White House statement. “An emerging community of civic leaders, data scientists, technologists, and companies are joining forces to build ‘Smart Cities’ – communities that are building an infrastructure to continuously improve the collection, aggregation, and use of data to improve the life of their residents – by harnessing the growing data revolution, low-cost sensors, and research collaborations, and doing so securely to protect safety and privacy.”

The launch of White House Smart Cities Initiative

[More…]

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WASHINGTON, July 12, 2013 – A panel discussion held Wednesday afternoon addressed advances in smart grid technology as well as the challenge ahead for the future, at the 10th annual National Town Meeting on Demand Response and Smart Grid.

Jason Wilson, Senior Vice President of Business Management and Product Development for On-Ramp Wireless, said that much of the current smart grid growth is not necessarily a result of new technology but rather more affordable technology, allowing utility companies to pursue the creation of smart grids.

This increasing utilization of smart grid technology has led to improved service from utility companies. While they still perform the same functions, they are able to perform those functions much more efficiently and reliably, as Robert Ethier, Vice President of Market Developments for ISO New England, noted.

The panel also discussed the role of smart meters in the development of smart grid technology. A poll of the audience showed that the majority felt that smart meters were over emphasized. The panelists agreed that smart grid technology went far beyond simply utilizing smart meters, but Chris King, Global Chief Regulatory Officer for Siemens Smart Grid claimed that they are a necessary starting point as a means of gathering crucial data.

“[The smart meter] is not going to get you all the way there, but you can’t start without it, Mike Carlson, General Manager for Software Solutions at General Electric Digital Energy, said.

The need for standards was also a major subject of debate among the panelists. Carlson discussed both benefits and disadvantages to the imposition of strict standards. Although they could prevent needless losses, excessive standards may hinder pioneers from innovating, he noted.

Consequently, King praised the National Institute of Standards and Technology for their recommendations. NIST released a number of standards that have applied successfully within the industry without applying any strict mandates.

The panelists also addressed security and privacy concerns associated with smart grid data collection. Kara Rinaldi, Executive Director of the National Home Performance Council, dismissed as overblown and irrational concerns that some people have about others knowing when they are home based on energy use, since potential thieves are highly unlikely to have access to this information.

Rinaldi also noted that most companies in the industry are highly committed to security and must have such a commitment to be successful.

“If you can’t handle security and privacy, you shouldn’t be in this business,” she said.

Additionally, King argued that the benefits from such data collection are far too great to ignore. The more immediate and specific feedback consumers receive about their energy usage, the more likely they are to adjust their use, he noted.

Continue Reading

Advanced Energy

At National Town Meeting on Smart Grid, Leaders Tout Role of ‘Microgrids’ in Energy Efficiency Projects

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WASHINGTON, July 12, 2013 – A panel discussion held Wednesday afternoon addressed advances in smart grid technology as well as the challenge ahead for the future, at the 10th annual National Town Meeting on Demand Response and Smart Grid.

Jason Wilson, Senior Vice President of Business Management and Product Development for On-Ramp Wireless, said that much of the current smart grid growth is not necessarily a result of new technology but rather more affordable technology, allowing utility companies to pursue the creation of smart grids.

This increasing utilization of smart grid technology has led to improved service from utility companies. While they still perform the same functions, they are able to perform those functions much more efficiently and reliably, as Robert Ethier, Vice President of Market Developments for ISO New England, noted.

The panel also discussed the role of smart meters in the development of smart grid technology. A poll of the audience showed that the majority felt that smart meters were over emphasized. The panelists agreed that smart grid technology went far beyond simply utilizing smart meters, but Chris King, Global Chief Regulatory Officer for Siemens Smart Grid claimed that they are a necessary starting point as a means of gathering crucial data.

“[The smart meter] is not going to get you all the way there, but you can’t start without it, Mike Carlson, General Manager for Software Solutions at General Electric Digital Energy, said.

The need for standards was also a major subject of debate among the panelists. Carlson discussed both benefits and disadvantages to the imposition of strict standards. Although they could prevent needless losses, excessive standards may hinder pioneers from innovating, he noted.

Consequently, King praised the National Institute of Standards and Technology for their recommendations. NIST released a number of standards that have applied successfully within the industry without applying any strict mandates.

The panelists also addressed security and privacy concerns associated with smart grid data collection. Kara Rinaldi, Executive Director of the National Home Performance Council, dismissed as overblown and irrational concerns that some people have about others knowing when they are home based on energy use, since potential thieves are highly unlikely to have access to this information.

Rinaldi also noted that most companies in the industry are highly committed to security and must have such a commitment to be successful.

“If you can’t handle security and privacy, you shouldn’t be in this business,” she said.

Additionally, King argued that the benefits from such data collection are far too great to ignore. The more immediate and specific feedback consumers receive about their energy usage, the more likely they are to adjust their use, he noted.

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