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Bringing Moore’s Law Off the Desktop and Into the Cloud By Intel CEO at Consumer Electronics Show

LAS VEGAS, January 7, 2014 – Just six months on the job, the new CEO of Silicon Valley computing giant Intel came to the International Consumer Electronics Show here to hail the power of tiny.

“Most of my career, computing has been something that you hold in your hand, in your pocket, or that sits on a desk,” said CEO Brian Krzanich. “That idea is about to be transformed.”

“We are entering this tiny world,” he said, referring to the Intel Tri-Gate three-dimensional 22 nanometer transistor, and “tiny could not be better.” Future advances toward 14 nanometer transistors are in the works, he said.

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LAS VEGAS, January 7, 2014 – Just six months on the job, the new CEO of Silicon Valley computing giant Intel came to the International Consumer Electronics Show here to hail the power of tiny.

“Most of my career, computing has been something that you hold in your hand, in your pocket, or that sits on a desk,” said CEO Brian Krzanich. “That idea is about to be transformed.”

“We are entering this tiny world,” he said, referring to the Intel Tri-Gate three-dimensional 22 nanometer transistor, and “tiny could not be better.” Future advances toward 14 nanometer transistors are in the works, he said.

Krzanich, an engineer with 32 years of experience at Intel, spoke about a range of technologies and products to be launched by the company in 2014. Most of them rely on this extremely small microprocessor, and include:

  • A earbud for music /heart rate monitor combination;
  • A smart digital headset, dubbed the Jarvis, that helps you navigate appointments and traveling directions;
  • A smart watch with geo-fencing, or the ability for a parent to determine and “fence” in the permissible locations of a young child using the device;
  • A wearable smart device, dubbed Edison, taking computing to a new level, including the ability to monitor and communicate information about the sleep pattern and temperature of baby wearing a onesie jumpsuit.

When the baby’s temperature rises or when he or she awakes, Edison communicate with radio-transmitters in the parents’ coffee mug, and also automatically turn on a hot bottle warmer so that it will be ready when the baby awakes.

This “Nursury 2.0” is just one example of “a network of devices, all smart, all working together, all coming to market in 2014,” said Krzanich.

To facilitate an ecosystem of innovation around Edison, Krzanich announced $1.3 billion in prices to design the next big wearable technology. He also said that the company would make its McAfee anti-virus software available for free on all consumer mobile devices.

Krzanich made his “tiny is big” address on Monday night here, the power position at #CES2014 historically dominated — in the era when the personal computer was big — by former Microsoft CEO Bill Gates.

Microsoft famously didn’t have a booth at last year’s CES. Although the software company has “returned” to the show this year, Microsoft no longer has the power position in the marketplace because the company has struggle to make the transition from the desktop world to the m

Neither is Intel , which makes the computing “brains” that live in a range of computers, tablets, phones, and now smaller devices, assured continued success as digital technology makes the next stage of its evolution.obile device world.

But Krzanich argued that innovation is moving away from the keyboard interface, and into a much smaller place. This is the environment in which countless digital devices will be integrated and should work together to positively impact humans’ lives.

In other aspects of his remarks, Krzanich discussed how tablet computers are being more effectively used by businesses, in addition to consumer use. For example, the food chain Applebee’s has met with success by putting Intel-based tablets table-side.

That’s enabled quicker table turnover for the restaurant company. Waiters and waitresses are benefitting too, with 15 percent higher tips, he said.

In another move designed to appeal to the corporate world, Krzanich announced that Intel-based tablets will allow use of both the Android operating system and the Windows 8 operating system for both tablets and computers.

Intel’s Krzanich also highlighted immersive reality, where computing power in creating new games that combine both a physical sandbox and a virtual character who “plays” in the space. He used a similar technology to showcase a giant virtual whale “swimming” around the ballroom where he gave the keynote.

Krzanich also discussed Intel’s commitment to end the struggle over so-called “conflict minerals” obtained from the blood-stained region of central Africa.

And he concluded by re-emphasized the company’s legacy commitment to encouraging scientific education and innovation, showcasing a range of winners of the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair and competition.

Drew Clark is Publisher of BroadbandBreakfast.com and tracks the development of Gigabit Networks, broadband usage, the universal service fund, and wireless spectrum policy at http://twitter.com/broadbandcensus. Nationally recognized for his knowledge on telecommunications law and policy, Clark brings experts and practitioners together to advance the benefits provided by broadband: job creation, telemedicine, online learning, public safety, the smart grid, eGovernment, and family connectedness. Clark is also available on Google+ and Twitter.

Drew Clark is the Editor and Publisher of BroadbandBreakfast.com and a nationally-respected telecommunications attorney at The CommLaw Group. He has closely tracked the trends in and mechanics of digital infrastructure for 20 years, and has helped fiber-based and fixed wireless providers navigate coverage, identify markets, broker infrastructure, and operate in the public right of way. The articles and posts on Broadband Breakfast and affiliated social media, including the BroadbandCensus Twitter feed, are not legal advice or legal services, do not constitute the creation of an attorney-client privilege, and represent the views of their respective authors.

Digital Inclusion

Digital Inclusion Leaders a Critical Step to Closing Digital Divide: National League of Cities

The National League of Cities said government leaders need to have ‘multiple points of engagement’ with communities.

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Lena Geraghty, National League of Cities director of urban innovation

WASHINGTON, January 20, 2022 – To understand the digital divide, cities need to include digital equity leaders in their broadband needs assessment programs, the National League of Cities said at an event on community connectivity challenges Wednesday.

A broadband needs assessment would allow city leaders to explore the extent of the digital divide in their communities, said Lena Geraghty, the National League of Cities’ director of urban innovation.

“[A needs assessment] enable city leaders to dig into who’s being excluded, what’s currently available in your city, and what solutions city leaders can use” to close the digital divide, she said.

“The community is going to know best about where access exists, where gaps exist, and the needs that will make connectivity better,” Geraghty said. To get the best picture of a community’s need, stakeholders must find and include the community’s digital equity leaders in the data-gathering process, she added.

“These could be people that are knowledgeable about digital equity or people that are experiencing the digital divide,” she said. “Think really broadly about what it means to be a leader and the type of information these folks can bring to bear in solving the digital divide in your communities.”

Geraghty said it may be useful to formalize the leaders’ work by creating a broadband working group or ad hoc committee led by the city’s government. “Giving some roles and responsibilities can help everyone move in the same in direction, there’s agreement, and really clear goals and outcomes.”

Geraghty added that it’s important for government leaders to establish multiple points of engagement for the community. “It’s not enough to gather data or information from people once,” she said. “The state of access to the internet and devices is always changing,” so leaders should create multiple touch points for community input.

The National League of Cities released its Digital Equity Playbook for cities in December, walking readers through how they can promote digital equity in their cities. The playbook has a four-step process on how to get started with digital equity.

By walking readers through the process of connecting with the community, evaluating the connectivity landscape, gathering foundational information and reporting on findings, city leaders will be prepared to target broadband funding to unserved and underserved areas in their communities.

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Environment

FCC Commissioner Starks Says Commission Looking into Impact of Broadband, 5G on Environment

Starks sat down to discuss the promise of smart grid technology for the environment.

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FCC Commissioner Geoffrey Starks

WASHINGTON, January 19, 2022 – Former and current leaders within the Federal Communications Commission agreed Thursday that it is important to make sure the FCC’s broadband efforts support the nation’s goals for the environment.

On Thursday, during a Cooley law firm fireside chat event, Robert McDowell, a former FCC director, and current FCC Commissioner Geoffrey Starks discussed how broadband expansion and next-generation 5G mobile networks will affect the environment.

Starks said that the commission is currently focusing on answering that exact question and are evaluating the current attempts to protect the environment, as more money is expected from the federal government and as broadband infrastructure expands. That includes putting more fiber into the ground and erecting more cell towers, but also allowing for a broadband-enabled smart grid system that will make automated decisions on energy allocation.

Smart grid systems, for example, provide real-time monitoring of the energy used in the electrical system. These systems can help to reduce consumption and carbon emissions, Starks said, by rerouting excess power and addressing power outages instantaneously in the most efficient and environmentally friendly manner. The smart grid systems will monitor “broadband systems in the 900 MHz band,” said Starks.

Starks also noted the Senate’s “Strengthening Mobility and Revolutionizing Transportation” initiative, which would set apart $500 million for cities across America so they can begin working on ways to lower carbon emissions.

FCC also focused on digital discrimination

Starks said the commission is also focusing on “making sure that there is no digital discrimination on income level, race, ethnicity, religion, national origin,” and that it all comes down to funding and who needs the money.

He stated that the first step is to finalize the maps and data that have been collected so funding can be targeted to the areas and people that need it the most. Many have remarked that the $65 billion allocated to broadband from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act will not be divvied out until adequate maps are put in place.

Starks noted that broadband subsidy program Lifeline, although fundamental to some people’s lives, is significantly underutilized. Starks stated that participation rates hover around 20 percent, which led the FCC to explore other options while attempting to make Lifeline more effective. For example, the Emergency Broadband Benefit Program – which provides monthly broadband subsidies – has been replaced by the Affordable Connectivity Program, a long-term and revised edition of the pandemic-era program.

Starks and McDowell also stated their support for the confirmation by the Senate of Alan Davidson as the permanent head of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration and expressed that Davidson will be a key player in these efforts.

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Broadband's Impact

CES 2022: Public-Private Partnerships Key to Building Smart Cities, Tech leaders Say

Public-private partnerships will increase the community benefit of infrastructure projects, leaders at Qualcomm and Verizon said.

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Panelists on the “Smart Cities and Public-Private Partnerships” CES session on Friday.

LAS VEGAS, January 12, 2022––Telecommunications industry leaders said Friday at the Consumer Electronics Show that public-private partnerships will pave the way to realizing the future of smart cities.

Raymond Bauer, director of the domain specialist group that connects governments to Verizon’s telecommunications services, said the government needs private partners to improve its infrastructure efforts.

Referencing the recent passage of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, Bauer said governments should look forward to partnering with private technology companies to improve upcoming infrastructure projects.

“There’s a once in a lifetime opportunity from IIJA,” Bauer said. “We should find common ways to work in a way we haven’t in the past. There are certain goals and use cases to leverage the infrastructure we have,” he said.

The $1.2 trillion bipartisan legislation funds physical and digital infrastructure projects, including $65 billion for the expansion of broadband across the country.

Bauer said communities have a chance to monetize the services Verizon offers to communities if Verizon builds infrastructure for broadband access in underserved areas. “By bridging the digital divide, underserved communities get the services they need,” he added.

Ashok Tipirneni, head of smart cities and connected spaces at Qualcomm, said that cities should be thinking about how technology can improve much-needed infrastructure projects.

“Cities are growing faster than available utility,” he said, citing global issues of housing, water, and equity for vulnerable populations. “How do we ensure access for all citizens? And how can cities be in lock step with new technology, whatever it is?” he asked.

Qualcomm’s Smart Cities Accelerator Program delivers internet of things ecosystem products and services to member cities and local governments.

“New Orleans, Miami, and Los Angeles has local governments asking how they can do better,” he said. “They offer opportunities for partnerships that wouldn’t have been the case a few years ago.”

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