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How Internet Companies Are Driving a Public Utility Regulation Approach to Net Neutrality

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WASHINGTON, September 12, 2014 – In what would have seemed highly unlikely just a few months ago, growing support for public utility regulation is emerging. Tech companies, politicians, internet service providers, and component makers have started to outline their views regarding their policy approach to the issue of net neutrality. In order to understand the views of the major players and their respective camps, it is helpful to look back in time a bit.

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power lines via pixabay

In January 2014, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled, in Verizon Communications v. Federal Communications Commission, that the FCC lacked the authority to enforce both the anti-blocking and anti-discrimination clauses of the agency’s 2010 Open Internet Order unless broadband providers were reclassified as common carriers, and subject to the regulation as “telecommunications services” under Title II of the Communications Act.

Although the FCC arguably has the authority to reclassify internet access service as a “telecommunications,” such a move would be a significant reversal of agency decisions. About 10 years ago, the FCC chose to make fiber-optics exempt from common carrier regulation; then it took the same path for cable-modem services, and for digital subscriber line (DSL) service over copper wires.

Is ‘Light Regulation’ Still Regulation?

While FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has said that he is keeping the option of Title II regulation on the table, the thrust of his efforts have been aimed at regulating broadband providers without having to treat them as regulated entities.

The agency has argued that the D.C. Circuit has already authorized, using Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, (1) the transparency requirement in his proposed network neutrality rules; (2) a “no blocking” requirement; and (3) the enforcement of a “commercially unreasonable” standard against potentially discriminatory practices by internet service providers.

Wheeler believes that his agency can enforce the no blocking goal and the non-discrimination rule under Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. In a February 19 statement he said that the court agreed that the section “gives the FCC authority to encourage broadband deployment by, among other things, removing barriers to infrastructure deployment, encouraging innovation, and promoting competition.”

“The D.C. Circuit ruled that the FCC has the legal authority to issue enforceable rules of the road to preserve Internet freedom and openness.”

-FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler 

While major ISPs like Comcast and Time Warner Cable have said that they will continue to adhere to the principles of the 2010 Open Internet Order, critics of these companies want concrete safeguards. On January 30, a coalition of 86 groups, including the American Civil Liberties Union, Free Press, Demand Progress and Reddit, called for reclassification under Title II. In late February, Netflix signed a multiyear agreement with Comcast in which the video streaming company paid Comcast for a direct connection to Comcast’s network. It made a similar agreement with Verizon. Netflix has called for stronger net neutrality rules to protect an open internet.

Early Support for Wheeler’s Section 706 Approach

Some saw Wheeler’s proposition of enforcing net neutrality rules through Section 706 as a plausible way forward. In May, a huge coalition of tech companies, led by Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, Amazon, Facebook and Twitter, asked the FCC to protect users and companies “on both fixed and mobile platforms against blocking, discrimination, and paid prioritization.” Other companies that signed the letter include eBay, KickStarter, Reddit, WordPress, Mozilla, Dropbox, LinkedIn, Foursquare, Digg, Meetup and Lyft. However, these companies didn’t explicitly state which route – Section 706 or Title II reclassification — they supported.

A renewed push for reclassification started in July. In its FCC filing, Netflix made clear its staunch support for reclassification. In addition to advocacy groups like Free Press, Public Knowledge and EFF, both The New York Times editorial board and former FCC Commissioner Michael Copps, who now heads the advocacy group Common Cause, have argued for the common carrier solution. Tech companies Etsy and Dwolla have also joined this camp along with tech incubator Y Combinator, whose founder Alexis Ohanian argued that only reclassification would give the FCC the necessary authority to halt paid prioritization.

“The FCC cannot impose a nondiscrimination rule–unless it classifies broadband providers under Title II,” wrote Ohanian in a letter to the FCC. “The Court also held that, without classifying broadband providers under Title II, the FCC could not ban charging fees for priority access, even though the FCC recognized such fees would be a ‘significant departure from historical and current practice.’ ”

On Wednesday, September 10, the Battle for the Net’s “Slow Lane Protest” saw more than 10,000 websites participate, including Netflix, WordPress, Vimeo, Tumblr, FourSquare, KickStarter and Dropbox, display a symbolic loading icon on their respective sites that encouraged visitors to contact members of Congress, the White House and the FCC about net neutrality. This symbolic internet slowdown generated “nearly 300,000 calls and more than 2 million emails to Congress,” while “722,364 people filed comments at the FCC,” a press release from Fight for the Future stated.

Absent from the “slowdown” participants were tech giants Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Yahoo. These companies have signed on to coalitions that support open internet principles, and Google took to its “Take Action” page to voice its opposition for paid prioritization. Google did not respond to a request for comment as to why the company did not participate in Wednesday’s protest.

ISPs, Carriers & Equipment Companies Oppose Reclassification

Although ISPs like Comcast and Time Warner have been vague. Many of them are proponents of light regulation that they state has allowed them to grow and thrive. Comcast’s most recent post on their blog cements their stance against reclassification, together with a seemingly strong statement of support for open internet rules under Section 706. However, Comcast does not actually say that it supports this route; rather, it states that “The Courts have laid out a clear path and clear authority (under Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act) for the FCC to adopt robust and legally enforceable Open Internet rules.”

Other major carriers have taken a similar approach. Verizon has been an opponent of reclassification, a viewpoint reiterated in their filing with the FCC on July 17. Ars Technica reported that Verizon said Title II reclassification would require web services like Netflix to pay Verizon. In May, AT&T stated that they believed reclassification would “cause risks and harms that dwarf any putative benefits.” The telecommunications giant said in a filing with the FCC on July 17th that it supported a Section 706 approach to enforcing net neutrality and ending paid prioritization.

In a filing submitted on July 15, the Telecommunications Industry Association said that reclassification would “thwart cycle of investment, competition and innovation” in the broadband space. Many members of the TIA, such as Cisco, IBM, Intel, Panasonic, Broadcom, D-Link and Nokia, penned a letter to the FCC on September 9 in which they made similar comments.

 

FCC

Cable Group NCTA Says Deny Exclusive Multitenant Access, But Not Wiring, Agreements

NCTA said the FCC should deny exclusive access to these buildings, but not exclusive wiring agreements.

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Michael Powell, president and CEO of NCTA

WASHINGTON, September 8, 2021 – The internet and television association NCTA is suggesting that the Federal Communications Commission deny all broadband providers exclusive access to multitenant buildings, but to continue allowing exclusive wiring agreements.

On Tuesday, the FCC opened a new round of comments into its examination of competitive broadband options for residents of apartments, multi-tenant and office buildings.

In a Tuesday ex parte notice to the commission, which follows a formal meeting with agency staff on September 2, the NCTA said the record shows that deployment, competition, and consumer choice in multiple tenant environments “are strong,” and that the FCC can “promote even greater deployment and competition by prohibiting not just cable operators, other covered [multiple video programming distributors], and telecommunications carriers, but all broadband providers from entering into MTE exclusive access agreements.

The organization, whose member companies include Comcast, Cox Communications and Charter Communications, also said it should continue to allow providers to enter into exclusive wiring agreements with MTE owners. Wiring just means that the provider can lay down its cables, like fiber, to connect residents.

“Exclusive wiring agreements do not deny new entrants access to MTEs. Rather, exclusive wiring agreements are pro-competitive and help ensure that state-of-the-art wiring will be deployed in MTEs to the benefit of consumers.”

The NCTA also told the FCC that there would be technical problems with simultaneous sharing of building wires by different providers and vouched for exclusive marketing arrangements, according to the notice.

The FCC’s new round of comments comes after a bill, introduced on July 30 by Rep. Yvette Clarke, D-New York, outlined plans to address exclusivity agreements between residential units and service providers, which sees providers lock out other carriers from buildings and leaving residents with only one option for internet.

Reached for comment on the filing, a spokesman for NCTA said they had nothing to add to the filing, which was signed by Mary Beth Murphy, deputy general counsel to the cable organization.

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China

Hytera’s Inclusion on FCC’s National Security Blacklist ‘Absurd,’ Client Says

Diversified Communications Group said the FCC flubbed on adding Hytera to blacklist.

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Acting FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel

WASHINGTON, September 8, 2021 – A client of a company that has been included in a list of companies the Federal Communications Commission said pose threats to the security of the country’s networks is asking the agency to reconsider including the company.

In a letter to the commission on Tuesday, Diversified Communications Group, which installs and distributes two-way radio communications devices to large companies, said the inclusion of Hytera Communications Corporation, a Chinese manufacturer of radio equipment, on a list of national security threats is “absurd” because the hardware involved is not connected to the internet and “does not transmit any sensitive or proprietary data.

“It seems that Hytera has been lumped in with other Chinese companies on the Covered List simply because they happen to manufacture electronics in the same country,” Diversified’s CEO Ryan Holte said in the letter, adding Hytera’s products have helped Diversified’s business thrive.

“This is a wrong that should be righted. Hytera is not a national security risk. They are an essential business partner to radio companies throughout the U.S.,” the CEO added.

In March, the FCC announced that it had designated Hytera among other Chinese businesses with alleged links to the Communist government. Others included Huawei, ZTE, Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology, and Dahua Technology.

List among a number of restrictions on Chinese companies

This list of companies was created in accordance with the Secure Networks Act, and the FCC indicated that it would continue to add companies to the list if they are deemed to “pose an unacceptable risk to national security or the security and safety of U.S. persons.”

Last month, the Senate commerce committee passed through legislation that would compel the FCC to no longer issue new equipment licenses to China-backed companies.

Last year the U.S. government took steps to ensure that federal agencies could not purchase goods or services from the aforementioned companies, and had previously added them to an economic blacklist.

In July, the FCC voted in favor of putting in place measures that would require U.S. carriers to rip and replace equipment by these alleged threat companies.

The Biden administration has been making moves to isolate alleged Chinese-linked threats to the country’s networks. In June, the White House signed an executive order limiting investments in predominantly Chinese companies that it said poses a threat to national security.

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Digital Inclusion

FCC Says 5 Million Households Now Enrolled in Emergency Broadband Benefit Program

The $3.2 billion program provides broadband and device subsidies to eligible low-income households.

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Acting FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel

August 30, 2021—The Federal Communications Commission announced Friday that five million households have enrolled in the Emergency Broadband Benefit program.

The $3.2-billion program, which launched in May, provides a broadband subsidy of $50 per month to eligible low-income households and $75 per month for those living on native tribal lands, as well as a one-time reimbursement on a device. Over 1160 providers are participating, the FCC said, who are reimbursed the cost to provide the discounted services.

The agency has been updating the public on the number of participating households for the program. In June, the program was at just over three million and had passed four million last month. The program was part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021.

“Enrolling five million households into the Emergency Broadband Benefit Program in a little over three months is no small feat,” said FCC Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel. “This wouldn’t have been possible without the support of nearly 30,000 individuals and organizations who signed up as volunteer outreach partners.”

Rosenworcel added that conversations with partners and the FCC’s analysis shows the need for “more granular data” to bring these opportunities to more eligible families.

The program’s strong demand was seen as far back as March.

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