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Five Years After ‘Think Big With a Gig,’ Google Fiber No Longer The Only Major Gigabit Player

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February 3, 2015 – In announcing last week that it was expanding Google Fiber to four new metropolitan areas in the Southeastern United States, the search engine giant-turned-internet service provider emphasized multiple initiatives toward Gigabit Networks.

On January 27, Google announced that nearly five years after it announced its “Think Big With a Gig” campaign, it would expand its footprint beyond the troika of metropolitan areas it currently serves: Kansas City, Austin and Provo, Utah.

The company will build Gigabit Networks in 18 new cities within four new metropolitan areas: Atlanta, Charlotte, Nashville and Raleigh-Durham.

In a blog post, the company wrote:

Bringing Google Fiber to these cities is a long-term investment. We’ve been working closely with city leaders over the past year on a joint planning process to get their communities ready for Google Fiber—and now the really hard work begins. Our next step is to work with cities to create a detailed map of where we can put our thousands of miles of fiber, using existing infrastructure such as utility poles and underground conduit, and making sure to avoid things like gas and water lines. Then a team of surveyors and engineers will hit the streets to fill in missing details. Once we’re done designing the network (which we expect to wrap up in a few months), we’ll start construction.

In the post, by Google Fiber Vice President Dennis Kish, the company also wrote:

Today, we aren’t the only ones talking about gigabit broadband. From the White House to main street, a chorus of new voices is standing up for speed. Just last week during the State of the Union, the President called for faster networks so that innovators and entrepreneurs can build the next big idea. New research from the Fiber to the Home Council shows gigabit networks are contributing billions of dollars in economic growth. Communities across America are demanding more speed for their own homes and businesses, and we’re going to keep doing our part to help.

The nationwide “Think Big With a Gig” campaign — announced on February 10, 2010 – stimulated widespread interest in Gigabit-level connectivity, prompting more than 1,000 cities to apply to the company to build super-high-speed connectivity.

The company said it is continuing to explore bringing fiber to the metropolitan areas of Phoenix, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Antonio and San Jose.

Drew Clark is the Editor and Publisher of BroadbandBreakfast.com and a nationally-respected telecommunications attorney at The CommLaw Group. He has closely tracked the trends in and mechanics of digital infrastructure for 20 years, and has helped fiber-based and fixed wireless providers navigate coverage, identify markets, broker infrastructure, and operate in the public right of way. The articles and posts on Broadband Breakfast and affiliated social media, including the BroadbandCensus Twitter feed, are not legal advice or legal services, do not constitute the creation of an attorney-client privilege, and represent the views of their respective authors.

Infrastructure

Congress Must Support Multiple Broadband Technologies, Wireless Association Says

Debate has pitted certain tech over others, but the WIA says all broadband tech must be considered.

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WIA President and CEO Jonathan Adelstein

February 3, 2015 – In announcing last week that it was expanding Google Fiber to four new metropolitan areas in the Southeastern United States, the search engine giant-turned-internet service provider emphasized multiple initiatives toward Gigabit Networks.

On January 27, Google announced that nearly five years after it announced its “Think Big With a Gig” campaign, it would expand its footprint beyond the troika of metropolitan areas it currently serves: Kansas City, Austin and Provo, Utah.

The company will build Gigabit Networks in 18 new cities within four new metropolitan areas: Atlanta, Charlotte, Nashville and Raleigh-Durham.

In a blog post, the company wrote:

Bringing Google Fiber to these cities is a long-term investment. We’ve been working closely with city leaders over the past year on a joint planning process to get their communities ready for Google Fiber—and now the really hard work begins. Our next step is to work with cities to create a detailed map of where we can put our thousands of miles of fiber, using existing infrastructure such as utility poles and underground conduit, and making sure to avoid things like gas and water lines. Then a team of surveyors and engineers will hit the streets to fill in missing details. Once we’re done designing the network (which we expect to wrap up in a few months), we’ll start construction.

In the post, by Google Fiber Vice President Dennis Kish, the company also wrote:

Today, we aren’t the only ones talking about gigabit broadband. From the White House to main street, a chorus of new voices is standing up for speed. Just last week during the State of the Union, the President called for faster networks so that innovators and entrepreneurs can build the next big idea. New research from the Fiber to the Home Council shows gigabit networks are contributing billions of dollars in economic growth. Communities across America are demanding more speed for their own homes and businesses, and we’re going to keep doing our part to help.

The nationwide “Think Big With a Gig” campaign — announced on February 10, 2010 – stimulated widespread interest in Gigabit-level connectivity, prompting more than 1,000 cities to apply to the company to build super-high-speed connectivity.

The company said it is continuing to explore bringing fiber to the metropolitan areas of Phoenix, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Antonio and San Jose.

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Infrastructure

Inflationary Pressures Increasing Difficulty of Closing Digital Divide, Officials Say

Government officials say inflationary pressures may make connecting rural America harder than previously anticipated.

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Screenshot taken from The Broadband Bunch podcast event

February 3, 2015 – In announcing last week that it was expanding Google Fiber to four new metropolitan areas in the Southeastern United States, the search engine giant-turned-internet service provider emphasized multiple initiatives toward Gigabit Networks.

On January 27, Google announced that nearly five years after it announced its “Think Big With a Gig” campaign, it would expand its footprint beyond the troika of metropolitan areas it currently serves: Kansas City, Austin and Provo, Utah.

The company will build Gigabit Networks in 18 new cities within four new metropolitan areas: Atlanta, Charlotte, Nashville and Raleigh-Durham.

In a blog post, the company wrote:

Bringing Google Fiber to these cities is a long-term investment. We’ve been working closely with city leaders over the past year on a joint planning process to get their communities ready for Google Fiber—and now the really hard work begins. Our next step is to work with cities to create a detailed map of where we can put our thousands of miles of fiber, using existing infrastructure such as utility poles and underground conduit, and making sure to avoid things like gas and water lines. Then a team of surveyors and engineers will hit the streets to fill in missing details. Once we’re done designing the network (which we expect to wrap up in a few months), we’ll start construction.

In the post, by Google Fiber Vice President Dennis Kish, the company also wrote:

Today, we aren’t the only ones talking about gigabit broadband. From the White House to main street, a chorus of new voices is standing up for speed. Just last week during the State of the Union, the President called for faster networks so that innovators and entrepreneurs can build the next big idea. New research from the Fiber to the Home Council shows gigabit networks are contributing billions of dollars in economic growth. Communities across America are demanding more speed for their own homes and businesses, and we’re going to keep doing our part to help.

The nationwide “Think Big With a Gig” campaign — announced on February 10, 2010 – stimulated widespread interest in Gigabit-level connectivity, prompting more than 1,000 cities to apply to the company to build super-high-speed connectivity.

The company said it is continuing to explore bringing fiber to the metropolitan areas of Phoenix, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Antonio and San Jose.

Continue Reading

Infrastructure

Lumen Responds to Allegations it Underbuilds While Collecting Public Funds

The Communications Workers of America is accusing Lumen of underinvesting in broadband while taking public money.

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CWA District 7 Vice President Brenda Roberts

February 3, 2015 – In announcing last week that it was expanding Google Fiber to four new metropolitan areas in the Southeastern United States, the search engine giant-turned-internet service provider emphasized multiple initiatives toward Gigabit Networks.

On January 27, Google announced that nearly five years after it announced its “Think Big With a Gig” campaign, it would expand its footprint beyond the troika of metropolitan areas it currently serves: Kansas City, Austin and Provo, Utah.

The company will build Gigabit Networks in 18 new cities within four new metropolitan areas: Atlanta, Charlotte, Nashville and Raleigh-Durham.

In a blog post, the company wrote:

Bringing Google Fiber to these cities is a long-term investment. We’ve been working closely with city leaders over the past year on a joint planning process to get their communities ready for Google Fiber—and now the really hard work begins. Our next step is to work with cities to create a detailed map of where we can put our thousands of miles of fiber, using existing infrastructure such as utility poles and underground conduit, and making sure to avoid things like gas and water lines. Then a team of surveyors and engineers will hit the streets to fill in missing details. Once we’re done designing the network (which we expect to wrap up in a few months), we’ll start construction.

In the post, by Google Fiber Vice President Dennis Kish, the company also wrote:

Today, we aren’t the only ones talking about gigabit broadband. From the White House to main street, a chorus of new voices is standing up for speed. Just last week during the State of the Union, the President called for faster networks so that innovators and entrepreneurs can build the next big idea. New research from the Fiber to the Home Council shows gigabit networks are contributing billions of dollars in economic growth. Communities across America are demanding more speed for their own homes and businesses, and we’re going to keep doing our part to help.

The nationwide “Think Big With a Gig” campaign — announced on February 10, 2010 – stimulated widespread interest in Gigabit-level connectivity, prompting more than 1,000 cities to apply to the company to build super-high-speed connectivity.

The company said it is continuing to explore bringing fiber to the metropolitan areas of Phoenix, Portland, Salt Lake City, San Antonio and San Jose.

Continue Reading

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