Connect with us

Broadband News

Lexington, Home to the Kentucky Wired Middle-Mile Project, Seeks Municipal Fiber

Published

on

BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: The power of municipal broadband isn’t going away. While competition benefits everyone, it’s undeniable that as the custodians of their rights of way, local government will play a role in the telecommunications infrastructure developments of the future.

Charter gets competition in Lexington, Kentucky, as angry city enlists Indiana’s MetroNet to build FTTH network, from FierceCable

Lexington, Kentucky, citizens stopped getting mad at Charter Communications and decided to get a fiber-to-the-home network to compete with the cable company.

The city made a deal with Indiana’s MetroNet to start building in January a FTTH network that will cost somewhere between $70 million and $100 million, and somehow be privately funded.

“Just in time for Christmas, Santa Claus is coming to town,” said Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, announcing the project at a news conference covered by local media earlier this week.

MetroNet has reportedly promised to cover the Lexington’s entire urban region with 1-gig FTTH services over the next three to four years. The average internet speed in the area is only around 16 Mbps right now, according to a recent study.

[more…]

Source: Charter gets competition in Lexington, Kentucky, as angry city enlists Indiana’s MetroNet to build FTTH network | FierceCable

Drew Clark is the Editor and Publisher of BroadbandBreakfast.com and a nationally-respected telecommunications attorney at The CommLaw Group. He has closely tracked the trends in and mechanics of digital infrastructure for 20 years, and has helped fiber-based and fixed wireless providers navigate coverage, identify markets, broker infrastructure, and operate in the public right of way. The articles and posts on Broadband Breakfast and affiliated social media, including the BroadbandCensus Twitter feed, are not legal advice or legal services, do not constitute the creation of an attorney-client privilege, and represent the views of their respective authors.

Broadband Roundup

Lina Khan Advances In FTC Bid, Biden Signs Executive Order On Cybersecurity, And Commits To Combatting Extremism

Lina Khan continues toward FTC role, Biden makes cybersecurity order after Colonial Pipeline, and U.S. joins the Christchurch call.

Published

on

Lina Khan continues bid for lead on FTC

BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: The power of municipal broadband isn’t going away. While competition benefits everyone, it’s undeniable that as the custodians of their rights of way, local government will play a role in the telecommunications infrastructure developments of the future.

Charter gets competition in Lexington, Kentucky, as angry city enlists Indiana’s MetroNet to build FTTH network, from FierceCable

Lexington, Kentucky, citizens stopped getting mad at Charter Communications and decided to get a fiber-to-the-home network to compete with the cable company.

The city made a deal with Indiana’s MetroNet to start building in January a FTTH network that will cost somewhere between $70 million and $100 million, and somehow be privately funded.

“Just in time for Christmas, Santa Claus is coming to town,” said Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, announcing the project at a news conference covered by local media earlier this week.

MetroNet has reportedly promised to cover the Lexington’s entire urban region with 1-gig FTTH services over the next three to four years. The average internet speed in the area is only around 16 Mbps right now, according to a recent study.

[more…]

Source: Charter gets competition in Lexington, Kentucky, as angry city enlists Indiana’s MetroNet to build FTTH network | FierceCable

Continue Reading

Broadband Roundup

Vermont Looks To Expand Coverage, California Moves On Passive Infrastructure, AT&T Gets DoT Contract, Cisco Buys Sedona

Vermont looks to expand broadband, California looks at passive infrastructure, AT&T gets DoT contract, and Cisco to buy Sedona.

Published

on

Vermont Governor Phil Scott

BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: The power of municipal broadband isn’t going away. While competition benefits everyone, it’s undeniable that as the custodians of their rights of way, local government will play a role in the telecommunications infrastructure developments of the future.

Charter gets competition in Lexington, Kentucky, as angry city enlists Indiana’s MetroNet to build FTTH network, from FierceCable

Lexington, Kentucky, citizens stopped getting mad at Charter Communications and decided to get a fiber-to-the-home network to compete with the cable company.

The city made a deal with Indiana’s MetroNet to start building in January a FTTH network that will cost somewhere between $70 million and $100 million, and somehow be privately funded.

“Just in time for Christmas, Santa Claus is coming to town,” said Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, announcing the project at a news conference covered by local media earlier this week.

MetroNet has reportedly promised to cover the Lexington’s entire urban region with 1-gig FTTH services over the next three to four years. The average internet speed in the area is only around 16 Mbps right now, according to a recent study.

[more…]

Source: Charter gets competition in Lexington, Kentucky, as angry city enlists Indiana’s MetroNet to build FTTH network | FierceCable

Continue Reading

Broadband News

FCC Launches Emergency Broadband Benefit Program

The Emergency Broadband Benefit is designed to help economically disadvantaged households get reliable broadband at a subsidized rate.

Published

on

BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: The power of municipal broadband isn’t going away. While competition benefits everyone, it’s undeniable that as the custodians of their rights of way, local government will play a role in the telecommunications infrastructure developments of the future.

Charter gets competition in Lexington, Kentucky, as angry city enlists Indiana’s MetroNet to build FTTH network, from FierceCable

Lexington, Kentucky, citizens stopped getting mad at Charter Communications and decided to get a fiber-to-the-home network to compete with the cable company.

The city made a deal with Indiana’s MetroNet to start building in January a FTTH network that will cost somewhere between $70 million and $100 million, and somehow be privately funded.

“Just in time for Christmas, Santa Claus is coming to town,” said Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, announcing the project at a news conference covered by local media earlier this week.

MetroNet has reportedly promised to cover the Lexington’s entire urban region with 1-gig FTTH services over the next three to four years. The average internet speed in the area is only around 16 Mbps right now, according to a recent study.

[more…]

Source: Charter gets competition in Lexington, Kentucky, as angry city enlists Indiana’s MetroNet to build FTTH network | FierceCable

Continue Reading

Recent

Signup for Broadband Breakfast

Get twice-weekly Breakfast Media news alerts.
* = required field

Trending