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Lexington, Home to the Kentucky Wired Middle-Mile Project, Seeks Municipal Fiber

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BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: The power of municipal broadband isn’t going away. While competition benefits everyone, it’s undeniable that as the custodians of their rights of way, local government will play a role in the telecommunications infrastructure developments of the future.

Charter gets competition in Lexington, Kentucky, as angry city enlists Indiana’s MetroNet to build FTTH network, from FierceCable

Lexington, Kentucky, citizens stopped getting mad at Charter Communications and decided to get a fiber-to-the-home network to compete with the cable company.

The city made a deal with Indiana’s MetroNet to start building in January a FTTH network that will cost somewhere between $70 million and $100 million, and somehow be privately funded.

“Just in time for Christmas, Santa Claus is coming to town,” said Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, announcing the project at a news conference covered by local media earlier this week.

MetroNet has reportedly promised to cover the Lexington’s entire urban region with 1-gig FTTH services over the next three to four years. The average internet speed in the area is only around 16 Mbps right now, according to a recent study.

[more…]

Source: Charter gets competition in Lexington, Kentucky, as angry city enlists Indiana’s MetroNet to build FTTH network | FierceCable

Broadband Roundup

Google Not Publisher to Australian Court, Omnispace Testing 5G Satellites, AT&T’s $6M to Digital Literacy

Australia’s highest court said Google is not a publisher by making available hyperlinks to articles.

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Photo of the High Court of Australia, via Wikicommons

August 18, 2022 – Australia’s highest court ruled Wednesday that Google is not a publisher of information that emerges from the use of its search engine, overturning a lower court decision that opened Google up to a defamation lawsuit.

The Supreme Court of Victoria ruled that Google was a publisher by virtue of the fact that it was providing a hyperlink in its search results to a 2004 news article which outlined conspiracy and incitement to murder charges – that were later dismissed – against the defendant and now criminal lawyer George Defteros. The appeal court upheld this view.

But the country’s highest court disagreed Wednesday. “A hyperlink provides a reference to another source and does not itself constitute publication of it,” the decision said. “Although the link may facilitate the transfer of information, which her Honour accepted as a hallmark of publication, it is equally clear that when a person follows a link, they are leaving one source and moving to another.

“The fact that accessing the content is made far easier with hyperlinks does not alter the fact that a hyperlink, by itself (and as distinct from a search result in which the link is embedded), is ‘content-neutral,’” added the decision.

In a press release on Wednesday, internet advocacy group Public Knowledge said it supports the decision, which “affirms the important of 230-like protections for entities that provide access to user-generated content,” referring to a provision in the Communications Decency Act that shields internet platforms from being liable for what their users post.

Omnispace and Philippine telecom collaborating on 5G from space

Virginia-based mobile communications and satellite company Omnispace announced Wednesday it is partnering with Philippines-based telecom Smart Communications to test space-based 5G communications using low-earth orbit satellites.

The demonstration will examine use cases for the Philippine market, according to a press release, including enabling 5G in rural areas, using internet of things and sensors to monitor weather and natural calamities, and enhancing network coverage for disaster relief and other uses.

Earlier this year, Omnispace completed the deployment phase of its Omnispace Spark program, which is the initial phase in the company’s delivery of a 5G capable satellite network. Omnispace’s satellite network will communicate with mobile networks on land to serve mobile subscribers.

“We are excited to announce this collaborative agreement with Smart Communications, which shares our vision of delivering reliable mobile connectivity to consumer, government and enterprise users, everywhere,” Brian Pemberton, chief commercial officer at Omnispace, said in a press release. “Together with Smart, we seek to bridge the digital divide, while also providing the communications infrastructure to power the development of the Filipino economy of the future.”

Meanwhile, USCellular and Swedish telecom equipment provider Ericsson announced earlier this summer that they were testing 5G performance at attitude using drones.

AT&T commits $6M to digital literacy initiatives

AT&T said Tuesday that it is making $6 million in contributions to in-person digital literacy workshops ot more than 400 libraries and community centers across the country.

The telecom said in a press release it aims to help more than 65,000 people learn to use computers and mobile devices, navigate the internet and apps, participate in the digital world, and avoid scams.

The $6 million is part of a $2-billion commitment the company is making from 2021 to 2023 to bridge the digital divide, it said in the release.

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Broadband Roundup

All States Want BEAD Funds, Digicomm Secures Investment, Glo Fiber Expanding in PA

The NTIA announced all states and territories have applied for initial planning money from the $42.5B BEAD program.

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Photo of NTIA head Alan Davidson, left, via Flickr

August 17, 2022 – The National Telecommunications and Information Administration announced Wednesday that all states and territories have submitted applications for initial planning funds from its $42.5 billion broadband infrastructure program.

The announcement comes two days after the deadline to apply for the funds from the Broadband Equity, Access and Deployment program, part of the federal government’s Internet for All initiative. The NTIA said in a press release it will be evaluating the applications and “make awards available as expeditiously as possible.”

The initial planning funds could be used for activities including research and data collection, outreach and communications, technical assistance to potential subgrantees, training for employees of a broadband program, establishing a broadband office, mapping, surveys identifying underserved areas, and marketing the Federal Communications Commission’s broadband subsidy program, the Affordable Connectivity Program.

Within 270 days of receiving the funds, recipients are required to submit a five-year action plan establishing the goals and priorities for internet service, which will serve as a needs assessment, the NTIA said.

“The Internet for All Initiative will provide states and territories the resources they need for thorough planning, which is essential to ensure funding is used equitably, efficiently, and effectively,” said Alan Davidson, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Information. “I want to thank every state and territory for meeting our deadline so that we can close the digital divide as quickly and completely as possible.”

The unprecedented amount of money, which spawned from the passing of the Infrastructure, Investment and Jobs Act in November, received letters of intent to participate from all 50 states, D.C., and the territories, the NTIA announced last month.

Digicomm gets private equity investment

A private equity firm that has made investments in the likes of Charter Communications announced Tuesday it is making an investment in broadband distributor and reseller Digicomm.

Crestview Partners will make an undisclosed contribution to the Colorado-based company, which specializes in hybrid connections involving both coaxial and fiber lines for broadband.

“We believe that Crestview can support Digicomm’s growth through organic investments and M&A to expand the Company’s breadth of product and service offerings as it continues to serve as a value-added partner to its customers in the evolving broadband and communications industries,” Brian Cassidy, co-president and head of media at Crestview, said in a press release.

The investment will also involve adding John Schanz, former chief network officer at Comcast Cable, along with members of Crestview, including Cassidy, to Digicomm’s board.

Crestview has previous made investments in Congruex, WOW!, Insight Communications, Interoute Communications, and OneLink Communications.

Glo Fiber expanding in Pennsylvania

Glo Fiber announced Tuesday it has reached agreements with municipal officials to deploy direct fiber lines to homes in several areas in York County, Pennsylvania.

The areas include York Township, Dallastown Borough, Red Lion Borough, Yoe Borough, Windsor Borough, Windsor Township, and Spring Garden Township.

The subsidiary of Shenandoah Telecommunications Company said construction in the county began this month and will continue into 2023, bringing fiber and symmetrical download and upload speeds, streaming TV and unlimited local and long-distance phone service to over 24,000 homes and businesses throughout the county.

“We have a long, successful history of offering fiber service to large businesses in York County,” Chris Kyle, vice president of industry and regulatory affairs at Shentel, said in a press release. “It is exciting to continue this work by bringing Glo Fiber to thousands of county residents and businesses. Our network is capable of multi-gig service that will provide the speeds citizens need on a daily basis as well as offering a much-needed competitive choice.”

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Press Releases

Institute for Local Self-Reliance Announces Two Initiatives to Foster Local Broadband Solutions

Urban Digital Equity Bootcamp and Let’s Get Going Broadband Program announced.

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But the broadband landscape is complicated and confusing for those new to working in it. Every day, we hear from communities looking to orient themselves to the challenges and opportunities they face, and this need only seems to be growing. In response, the Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR) is excited to announce two new programs to help leaders and local government officials address their community’s needs in practical, efficient, clear-eyed ways, with sensitivity to all the things that make their community unique. ILSR has nearly 20 years of experience working on local broadband solutions that are accountable to local residents and businesses. We helped to develop the Tribal Broadband Bootcamp, and have worked with hundreds of communities from the smallest towns to the largest cities and counties.

Neither of the programs below is intended to replace existing specialized consultants. Rather, the aim is to help communities understand what their options are before they engage with consultants, so that they can be more efficient with their time.

Announcing the Urban Digital Equity Bootcamp

While most policymakers remain focused on broadband gaps in rural areas, residents of urban areas understand all too well the connectivity problems faced by those who live in cities. The greatest opportunities to achieve digital equity in urban communities is approaching, with unprecedented government and philanthropic support available to address needs long neglected. However, communities need local champions to ensure that problems are resolved in accordance with local goals.

More than 20 years of top-down solutions have failed to result in more connected, resilient communities. The Urban Digital Equity Bootcamps are instead based on the framework that bottom-up approaches, based on trust and local relationships, offer the best path forward. Modeled after the Tribal Broadband Bootcamp, and having learned lessons from the Digital Equity Leadership Lab and Broadband Accelerate approaches, we propose two-day events to develop skills and relationships as well as the needed expertise and partnerships to set and achieve digital equity goals. The program is designed to:

  • Increase knowledge and confidence of participants to allow them to better take action in their communities to achieve digital equity. This includes developing familiarity with key jargon and technologies related to Internet access.
  • Develop diverse cohorts and a larger human network of people sharing local strategies, challenges, and solutions.
  • Demystify Internet technology through hands-on applications and small group learning

Attendees will include a diverse group of stakeholders, from local leaders to activists to the philanthropic community. A key group of attendees would include organizations that already have the trust of frontline communities – groups that understand the importance of digital equity but haven’t had the capacity to address it. In larger communities, multiple events can be tailored to fit the different needs of different neighborhoods.

The primary objective will be building knowledge and trust among local organizations so they can engage in strategic campaigns of digital inclusion. These events will need significant local coordination to be effective.

The Urban Digital Equity Bootcamps will begin this fall. Contact Community Broadband Networks Outreach Team Lead DeAnne Cuellar at deanne@ilsr.org for more details, including cost.

Announcing the Let’s Get Going Broadband Program

Community broadband planning and coordinating digital inclusion ecosystems is complicated work. Cities and counties struggling to find the best tools and methodologies needed to address infrastructure and digital inclusion can find the solutions they need by participating in ILSR’s Let’s Get Going Broadband Program.

This eight-week, cohort-based program is designed to help local governments, elected officials, nonprofits, foundations, and digital equity advocates orient themselves and develop solutions. This progressive, syllabus-based program is aimed at helping participants understand local needs, evaluate options, and chart an achievable path to their goals. From leveraging existing assets, to financing, to partnerships, to evaluating available models for success, this program demystifies every step of the process.

It offers individualized advice and assistance along the way, while at the same time placing each community in a small cohort with other cities and counties aiming to solve similar problems. Each cohort will move through the Let’s Get Going Broadband Program together, sharing information, asking questions, and building a network of support along the way. It includes targeted readings, discussions facilitated by ILSR staff, interactive webinars, technical orientation, and lessons learned from fifteen years of tracking, writing about, and talking to communities that have tackled the task of improving their city infrastructure, boosting economic development, improving competition, and reaching the unserved and underserved by investing in locally owned solutions.

The first Let’s Get Going Broadband Program cohort is scheduled to begin in September. The cost per community is $15,000, and we recommend each community will select 3-5 participants to attend.

See the full program flyer with schedule here [pdf], or below.

It includes:

  • Cohort Building – An opportunity for a local broadband team to join a eight-week cohort with other communities in a customized curriculum to develop expertise in solving broadband challenges and taking advantage of funding opportunities.
  • Trainings – 90-minute interactive webinars  focused on understanding – in a commonly accessible manner – broadband technologies, challenges, and how similarly situated communities have addressed these problems.
  • Technical Assistance – Eight, 2-hour technical assistance sessions rooted in local needs
  • Community Progress Reports and Research – Help in developing an information-gathering project with diverse community stakeholders to define digital inclusion problems.

Contact Community Broadband Networks Outreach Team Lead DeAnne Cuellar at deanne@ilsr.org for more details.

Sign up for the Let’s Get Going Broadband Program here.

Originally published on the web site of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance’s Municipal Networks Project, this page is reprinted with permission.
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