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Big Tech

Facebook and Net Neutrality Aside, Local Broadband Leaders Can Make a Difference

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BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: While Washington alternatively obsesses over net neutrality, beating up on Facebook, or other distractions brought to us by the man in the White House, how refreshing is it to encounter a piece like this. Mark Howell is demonstrating that leadership on a local level can make a difference in bringing people what they really need: Better Broadband, faster and cheaper. An inspiring story from which much can be learned!

Saving net neutrality, one house at a time, from the Washington Post:

If the Facebook privacy debacle has shown one thing, it’s that technology companies have become immensely powerful and seemingly accountable to no one. Recent federal rollbacks of net neutrality and online privacy protections have put Americans in an even weaker position when dealing with Internet service providers.

But there is a way for the public to push back: through Internet service provided by local governments, which are directly accountable to citizens.

As the chief information officer for Concord, Mass., I’ve overseen the creation of a successful municipal broadband system by treating Internet service like what it really is — a public utility, like water and electricity. We’re providing residents with broadband Internet service that is inexpensive and reliable and respects net neutrality and privacy principles.

[more…]

Source: Saving net neutrality, one house at a time – The Washington Post

(Photo of Civil War Memorial at Monument Square in Concord, Massachusetts, by John Phelan used with permission.)

Drew Clark is the Editor and Publisher of BroadbandBreakfast.com and a nationally-respected telecommunications attorney at The CommLaw Group. He has closely tracked the trends in and mechanics of digital infrastructure for 20 years, and has helped fiber-based and fixed wireless providers navigate coverage, identify markets, broker infrastructure, and operate in the public right of way. The articles and posts on Broadband Breakfast and affiliated social media, including the BroadbandCensus Twitter feed, are not legal advice or legal services, do not constitute the creation of an attorney-client privilege, and represent the views of their respective authors.

Antitrust

FTC Divided Over Increasing Agency Jurisdiction at Congressional Hearing

FTC commissioners were split at a Congressional hearing on Wednesday at the prospects of increasing FTC jurisdiction.

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Rep. Jan Schakowsky, D-Illinois.

BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: While Washington alternatively obsesses over net neutrality, beating up on Facebook, or other distractions brought to us by the man in the White House, how refreshing is it to encounter a piece like this. Mark Howell is demonstrating that leadership on a local level can make a difference in bringing people what they really need: Better Broadband, faster and cheaper. An inspiring story from which much can be learned!

Saving net neutrality, one house at a time, from the Washington Post:

If the Facebook privacy debacle has shown one thing, it’s that technology companies have become immensely powerful and seemingly accountable to no one. Recent federal rollbacks of net neutrality and online privacy protections have put Americans in an even weaker position when dealing with Internet service providers.

But there is a way for the public to push back: through Internet service provided by local governments, which are directly accountable to citizens.

As the chief information officer for Concord, Mass., I’ve overseen the creation of a successful municipal broadband system by treating Internet service like what it really is — a public utility, like water and electricity. We’re providing residents with broadband Internet service that is inexpensive and reliable and respects net neutrality and privacy principles.

[more…]

Source: Saving net neutrality, one house at a time – The Washington Post

(Photo of Civil War Memorial at Monument Square in Concord, Massachusetts, by John Phelan used with permission.)

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Antitrust

Explainer: Antitrust Heats Up as Biden Selects Tech Critic Jonathan Kanter for Top Enforcement Spot

In the fourth in a series of explainers, Broadband Breakfast examines the Biden administration’s intent to bash Big Tech.

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Photo of Jonathan Kanter at the Capitol Forum by New America used with permission

BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: While Washington alternatively obsesses over net neutrality, beating up on Facebook, or other distractions brought to us by the man in the White House, how refreshing is it to encounter a piece like this. Mark Howell is demonstrating that leadership on a local level can make a difference in bringing people what they really need: Better Broadband, faster and cheaper. An inspiring story from which much can be learned!

Saving net neutrality, one house at a time, from the Washington Post:

If the Facebook privacy debacle has shown one thing, it’s that technology companies have become immensely powerful and seemingly accountable to no one. Recent federal rollbacks of net neutrality and online privacy protections have put Americans in an even weaker position when dealing with Internet service providers.

But there is a way for the public to push back: through Internet service provided by local governments, which are directly accountable to citizens.

As the chief information officer for Concord, Mass., I’ve overseen the creation of a successful municipal broadband system by treating Internet service like what it really is — a public utility, like water and electricity. We’re providing residents with broadband Internet service that is inexpensive and reliable and respects net neutrality and privacy principles.

[more…]

Source: Saving net neutrality, one house at a time – The Washington Post

(Photo of Civil War Memorial at Monument Square in Concord, Massachusetts, by John Phelan used with permission.)

Continue Reading

Big Tech

Proposed Bill Takes Aim at Misinformation on Social Media Platforms

Sen. Amy Klobuchar introduced a bill Thursday to remove Section 230 protections for vaccine misinformation.

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Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minnesota

BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: While Washington alternatively obsesses over net neutrality, beating up on Facebook, or other distractions brought to us by the man in the White House, how refreshing is it to encounter a piece like this. Mark Howell is demonstrating that leadership on a local level can make a difference in bringing people what they really need: Better Broadband, faster and cheaper. An inspiring story from which much can be learned!

Saving net neutrality, one house at a time, from the Washington Post:

If the Facebook privacy debacle has shown one thing, it’s that technology companies have become immensely powerful and seemingly accountable to no one. Recent federal rollbacks of net neutrality and online privacy protections have put Americans in an even weaker position when dealing with Internet service providers.

But there is a way for the public to push back: through Internet service provided by local governments, which are directly accountable to citizens.

As the chief information officer for Concord, Mass., I’ve overseen the creation of a successful municipal broadband system by treating Internet service like what it really is — a public utility, like water and electricity. We’re providing residents with broadband Internet service that is inexpensive and reliable and respects net neutrality and privacy principles.

[more…]

Source: Saving net neutrality, one house at a time – The Washington Post

(Photo of Civil War Memorial at Monument Square in Concord, Massachusetts, by John Phelan used with permission.)

Continue Reading

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