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How Bad is Life for Google? They Advertise in Conservative Magazines That Attack Them

Drew Clark

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WASHINGTON, December 11, 2018 – This is how bad it’s gotten for Google in Washington: The company is taking out ads on the back of the conservative National Review while, and the same time, the story suggests gaslighting the company.

The ad picks a conservative-friendly theme: “Now you can search ‘jobs for veterans’ and enter your MOS code to find civilian jobs that match your skills.”

Inside the article, “The populism Trump needs,” by Michael Brendan Dougherty, two of the six points are directly or indirectly aimed at Google: “Take the conflict with China to Silicon Valley,” and “Make Gavin Newsom defend Silicon Valley and the California Model.”

In the point about China, which is actually quote potent, Dougherty says:

  • The big Silicon Valley target should be Google, whose social utility is running out…. And now its political effect is threatening to become toxic. First, Google’s dominance across the Internet has effectively made it the world’s most powerful spy agency. That’s already a vulnerability that American rivals could exploit. But Google is planning on making things worse, as it actively explores a partnership with the Chinese government. Already Google has done work creating a censored version of the Internet for China. It has been caught compiling user data to help the Chinese government fill out its blacklists. This partnership is likely to be great in the short  term for Google, but it may give a geopolitical rival access to technologies and data that are vital to U.S. national security.

The point about Gov.-elect Newsom and the “California Model” is much more vapid. The big point seems to be that in California, life and real estate are expensive. And that is something for which the Democrats should be blamed?

(Photo of the December 17, 2018, edition of the National Review by Drew Clark.)

Drew Clark is the Editor and Publisher of BroadbandBreakfast.com and a nationally-respected telecommunications attorney at The CommLaw Group. He has closely tracked the trends in and mechanics of digital infrastructure for 20 years, and has helped fiber-based and fixed wireless providers navigate coverage, identify markets, broker infrastructure, and operate in the public right of way. The articles and posts on Broadband Breakfast and affiliated social media, including the BroadbandCensus Twitter feed, are not legal advice or legal services, do not constitute the creation of an attorney-client privilege, and represent the views of their respective authors.

Social Media

Josh Hawley Wants To Break Up Big Tech And Revisit How Antitrust Matters Are Considered

Senator Josh Hawley talks Section 230, antitrust reform, and the Capitol riots.

Benjamin Kahn

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on

Josh Hawley, right, via Flickr

WASHINGTON, December 11, 2018 – This is how bad it’s gotten for Google in Washington: The company is taking out ads on the back of the conservative National Review while, and the same time, the story suggests gaslighting the company.

The ad picks a conservative-friendly theme: “Now you can search ‘jobs for veterans’ and enter your MOS code to find civilian jobs that match your skills.”

Inside the article, “The populism Trump needs,” by Michael Brendan Dougherty, two of the six points are directly or indirectly aimed at Google: “Take the conflict with China to Silicon Valley,” and “Make Gavin Newsom defend Silicon Valley and the California Model.”

In the point about China, which is actually quote potent, Dougherty says:

  • The big Silicon Valley target should be Google, whose social utility is running out…. And now its political effect is threatening to become toxic. First, Google’s dominance across the Internet has effectively made it the world’s most powerful spy agency. That’s already a vulnerability that American rivals could exploit. But Google is planning on making things worse, as it actively explores a partnership with the Chinese government. Already Google has done work creating a censored version of the Internet for China. It has been caught compiling user data to help the Chinese government fill out its blacklists. This partnership is likely to be great in the short  term for Google, but it may give a geopolitical rival access to technologies and data that are vital to U.S. national security.

The point about Gov.-elect Newsom and the “California Model” is much more vapid. The big point seems to be that in California, life and real estate are expensive. And that is something for which the Democrats should be blamed?

(Photo of the December 17, 2018, edition of the National Review by Drew Clark.)

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Social Media

Oversight Board Upholds Trump’s Ban From Facebook

The Oversight Board has sent the decision back to Facebook management, criticizing it for setting a “standardless” penalty.

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

WASHINGTON, December 11, 2018 – This is how bad it’s gotten for Google in Washington: The company is taking out ads on the back of the conservative National Review while, and the same time, the story suggests gaslighting the company.

The ad picks a conservative-friendly theme: “Now you can search ‘jobs for veterans’ and enter your MOS code to find civilian jobs that match your skills.”

Inside the article, “The populism Trump needs,” by Michael Brendan Dougherty, two of the six points are directly or indirectly aimed at Google: “Take the conflict with China to Silicon Valley,” and “Make Gavin Newsom defend Silicon Valley and the California Model.”

In the point about China, which is actually quote potent, Dougherty says:

  • The big Silicon Valley target should be Google, whose social utility is running out…. And now its political effect is threatening to become toxic. First, Google’s dominance across the Internet has effectively made it the world’s most powerful spy agency. That’s already a vulnerability that American rivals could exploit. But Google is planning on making things worse, as it actively explores a partnership with the Chinese government. Already Google has done work creating a censored version of the Internet for China. It has been caught compiling user data to help the Chinese government fill out its blacklists. This partnership is likely to be great in the short  term for Google, but it may give a geopolitical rival access to technologies and data that are vital to U.S. national security.

The point about Gov.-elect Newsom and the “California Model” is much more vapid. The big point seems to be that in California, life and real estate are expensive. And that is something for which the Democrats should be blamed?

(Photo of the December 17, 2018, edition of the National Review by Drew Clark.)

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Big Tech

Lina Khan Pitches Ideas For Regulating Big Tech In Nomination Hearing

Senate Commerce Committee considers nominations for Lina Khan, Bill Nelson and Leslie Kiernan.

Tim White

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on

Screenshot of Lina Khan at Senate hearing

WASHINGTON, December 11, 2018 – This is how bad it’s gotten for Google in Washington: The company is taking out ads on the back of the conservative National Review while, and the same time, the story suggests gaslighting the company.

The ad picks a conservative-friendly theme: “Now you can search ‘jobs for veterans’ and enter your MOS code to find civilian jobs that match your skills.”

Inside the article, “The populism Trump needs,” by Michael Brendan Dougherty, two of the six points are directly or indirectly aimed at Google: “Take the conflict with China to Silicon Valley,” and “Make Gavin Newsom defend Silicon Valley and the California Model.”

In the point about China, which is actually quote potent, Dougherty says:

  • The big Silicon Valley target should be Google, whose social utility is running out…. And now its political effect is threatening to become toxic. First, Google’s dominance across the Internet has effectively made it the world’s most powerful spy agency. That’s already a vulnerability that American rivals could exploit. But Google is planning on making things worse, as it actively explores a partnership with the Chinese government. Already Google has done work creating a censored version of the Internet for China. It has been caught compiling user data to help the Chinese government fill out its blacklists. This partnership is likely to be great in the short  term for Google, but it may give a geopolitical rival access to technologies and data that are vital to U.S. national security.

The point about Gov.-elect Newsom and the “California Model” is much more vapid. The big point seems to be that in California, life and real estate are expensive. And that is something for which the Democrats should be blamed?

(Photo of the December 17, 2018, edition of the National Review by Drew Clark.)

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