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California’s Privacy Legislation Will Force Changes in the Way Businesses Collect Personal Information in 2020

Drew Clark

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BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: We’ve written about the California Consumer Privacy Act before in “European and Chinese Pressures are Squeezing Silicon Valley, Threatening a Global ‘Splinternet’. The fact of multiple states passing significant privacy legislation is one of the potential drivers for federal consideration of substantial privacy rules. Here, attorney Lauren Stickroth catalogs the various aspects of the bill, including: 1. Consumers having the right to know what information is collected about them, 2. Consumers having the ability to request compies of personal business records, 3. The deletion of personal information collected about the consumers, 4. An “opt-out” right, 5. Non-discrimination, and 6. The right to litigation.

Another day, another data breach: California’s security regulations to tighten in 2020 The California Consumer Privacy Act will require many businesses to change the way they collect information from consumers. By Lauren Stickroth in the Press-Enterprise:

Equifax, Target, Marriott. Another day, another data breach.

Hacking takes an immense toll on both the company and the consumers. As technology evolves, and businesses continue to collect and use personal information, they must also keep pace with the expanding set of data security regulations.

In 2016, California published its Data Breach Report. The report references 20 controls published by the Center for Internet Security, and calls them the “minimum level of information security that all organizations that collect or maintain personal information should meet.”

[more…]

Source: Another day, another data breach: California’s security regulations to tighten in 2020 – Press Enterprise

Drew Clark is the Editor and Publisher of BroadbandBreakfast.com and a nationally-respected telecommunications attorney at The CommLaw Group. He has closely tracked the trends in and mechanics of digital infrastructure for 20 years, and has helped fiber-based and fixed wireless providers navigate coverage, identify markets, broker infrastructure, and operate in the public right of way. The articles and posts on Broadband Breakfast and affiliated social media, including the BroadbandCensus Twitter feed, are not legal advice or legal services, do not constitute the creation of an attorney-client privilege, and represent the views of their respective authors.

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Broadband Roundup

US Telecom Report on American vs. European Broadband, COVID Patent Policy, A ‘Dark Force’ in Utah

This was not the first time Darth Vader strode into a council chamber, but this time he had positive news.

Benjamin Kahn

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Photo courtesy UTOPIA Fiber

BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: We’ve written about the California Consumer Privacy Act before in “European and Chinese Pressures are Squeezing Silicon Valley, Threatening a Global ‘Splinternet’. The fact of multiple states passing significant privacy legislation is one of the potential drivers for federal consideration of substantial privacy rules. Here, attorney Lauren Stickroth catalogs the various aspects of the bill, including: 1. Consumers having the right to know what information is collected about them, 2. Consumers having the ability to request compies of personal business records, 3. The deletion of personal information collected about the consumers, 4. An “opt-out” right, 5. Non-discrimination, and 6. The right to litigation.

Another day, another data breach: California’s security regulations to tighten in 2020 The California Consumer Privacy Act will require many businesses to change the way they collect information from consumers. By Lauren Stickroth in the Press-Enterprise:

Equifax, Target, Marriott. Another day, another data breach.

Hacking takes an immense toll on both the company and the consumers. As technology evolves, and businesses continue to collect and use personal information, they must also keep pace with the expanding set of data security regulations.

In 2016, California published its Data Breach Report. The report references 20 controls published by the Center for Internet Security, and calls them the “minimum level of information security that all organizations that collect or maintain personal information should meet.”

[more…]

Source: Another day, another data breach: California’s security regulations to tighten in 2020 – Press Enterprise

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Broadband Roundup

OneWeb Air Force Contract, Municipal Broadband Support, N.C. Bill To Force Electric Co-ops To Pay More

Air Force signs with OneWeb, few Americans want muni build ban, N.C. bill wants electrical co-ops paying for ISP-ready poles.

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

Photo of North Carolina Senator Kevin Corbin

BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: We’ve written about the California Consumer Privacy Act before in “European and Chinese Pressures are Squeezing Silicon Valley, Threatening a Global ‘Splinternet’. The fact of multiple states passing significant privacy legislation is one of the potential drivers for federal consideration of substantial privacy rules. Here, attorney Lauren Stickroth catalogs the various aspects of the bill, including: 1. Consumers having the right to know what information is collected about them, 2. Consumers having the ability to request compies of personal business records, 3. The deletion of personal information collected about the consumers, 4. An “opt-out” right, 5. Non-discrimination, and 6. The right to litigation.

Another day, another data breach: California’s security regulations to tighten in 2020 The California Consumer Privacy Act will require many businesses to change the way they collect information from consumers. By Lauren Stickroth in the Press-Enterprise:

Equifax, Target, Marriott. Another day, another data breach.

Hacking takes an immense toll on both the company and the consumers. As technology evolves, and businesses continue to collect and use personal information, they must also keep pace with the expanding set of data security regulations.

In 2016, California published its Data Breach Report. The report references 20 controls published by the Center for Internet Security, and calls them the “minimum level of information security that all organizations that collect or maintain personal information should meet.”

[more…]

Source: Another day, another data breach: California’s security regulations to tighten in 2020 – Press Enterprise

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Broadband Roundup

Boost Bundles TeleHealth, $100M For South Dakota Broadband, Frequencz Gets Financing

Boost is bundling telehealth services, South Dakota planning $100 million for broadband, Frequencz gets $4 million in capital.

Benjamin Kahn

Published

on

South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem

BROADBAND BREAKFAST INSIGHT: We’ve written about the California Consumer Privacy Act before in “European and Chinese Pressures are Squeezing Silicon Valley, Threatening a Global ‘Splinternet’. The fact of multiple states passing significant privacy legislation is one of the potential drivers for federal consideration of substantial privacy rules. Here, attorney Lauren Stickroth catalogs the various aspects of the bill, including: 1. Consumers having the right to know what information is collected about them, 2. Consumers having the ability to request compies of personal business records, 3. The deletion of personal information collected about the consumers, 4. An “opt-out” right, 5. Non-discrimination, and 6. The right to litigation.

Another day, another data breach: California’s security regulations to tighten in 2020 The California Consumer Privacy Act will require many businesses to change the way they collect information from consumers. By Lauren Stickroth in the Press-Enterprise:

Equifax, Target, Marriott. Another day, another data breach.

Hacking takes an immense toll on both the company and the consumers. As technology evolves, and businesses continue to collect and use personal information, they must also keep pace with the expanding set of data security regulations.

In 2016, California published its Data Breach Report. The report references 20 controls published by the Center for Internet Security, and calls them the “minimum level of information security that all organizations that collect or maintain personal information should meet.”

[more…]

Source: Another day, another data breach: California’s security regulations to tighten in 2020 – Press Enterprise

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